Página 1 dos resultados de 402 itens digitais encontrados em 0.003 segundos

Optimization of a fructooligosaccharides purification method using activated charcoal

Nobre, C.; Dominguez, Ana; Torres, D.; Rocha, Orlando; Rocha, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Teixeira, J. A.; Rodrigues, L. R.
Fonte: Universidade do Minho. Departamento de Engenharia Biológica Publicador: Universidade do Minho. Departamento de Engenharia Biológica
Tipo: Conferência ou Objeto de Conferência
Publicado em //2009 ENG
Relevância na Pesquisa
698.3743%
Fructooligosaccharides (FOS) have gained large commercial interest due to its beneficial properties in the human health as prebiotics. FOS are produced industrially by fermentative processes. However, the result of such fermentations is a complex mixture containing salts and approximately 50% (w/w) of low molecular weight sugars that have to be eliminated. Among other techniques that have been studied, the adsorption onto activated carbon is still the most suitable one since activated carbon is cheap, has a large surface area and pore volume conducting to a good sorption capacity. Furthermore, this sorbent can be regenerated during desorption with ethanol. Based on the above discussion, in this work the adsorption and desorption characteristics of FOS on activated carbon, using a gradient of ethanol, were optimized. Initially, the activated carbon was loaded with fermentative broth. To remove the non adsorbed sugars, a washing step with pure water was included. Afterwards, the retained sugars were recovered by elution with a gradient of ethanol increased sequentially with specific volumes from 1 to 50% (v/v). Fractions collected at different time points were evaporated and subsequently freeze‐dried. This process was found to be very efficient in the demineralization of broth...

Fructo-oligosaccharides purification from a fermentative broth using an activated charcoal column

Nobre, C.; Teixeira, J. A.; Rodrigues, L. R.
Fonte: Elsevier Publicador: Elsevier
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2012 ENG
Relevância na Pesquisa
699.29125%
In this study, a simple and efficient process to purify fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) from a fermentative broth was proposed using a single activated charcoal column. The FOS adsorption onto the activated charcoal was modeled by a pseudo-second order model. Several volumes and concentrations of water/ ethanol were studied to optimize the selective desorption of sugars from the broth mixture at 25 8C. Mixtures containing 50.6% (w/w) of FOS (FOS content in the fermentative broth) were purified to 92.9% (w/w) with a FOS recovery of 74.5% (w/w). Moreover, with the proposed process, fractions with purity up to 97% (w/w) of FOS were obtained. This purification process was also found to be efficient in the desalting of the fermentative broth.

X-ray fluorescence determination of adsorbed copper on activated charcoal after glycerin complexation

Bueno,Maria Izabel Maretti Silveira; Amaral,Lêda Cristina do
Fonte: Sociedade Brasileira de Química Publicador: Sociedade Brasileira de Química
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/07/1998 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
592.90074%
X-This work shows an alternative method to copper determination by X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF). Since copper concentration in natural waters is not enough to reach XRF detection limit, a liquid-solid preconcentration procedure was proposed. Glycerin was used to complex the metal increasing its adsorption on activated charcoal. The solid phase was used to XRF determination. Several parameters were evaluated, such as, the complexation pH, the charcoal adsorption limit and the glycerin concentration. The interferences are lead and bismuth and the sensitivities decreased in the order Cu2+, Bi3+ and Pb2+. The advantages of the method are its simplicity, low cost and low spectral interference.

The influence of pH, temperature and hydrolyzate concentration on the removal of volatile and nonvolatile compounds from sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolyzate treated with activated charcoal before or after vacuum evaporation

Rodrigues,R.C.L.B.; Felipe,M.G.A.; Silva,J.B.Almeida e; Vitolo,M.; Gómez,P.V.
Fonte: Brazilian Society of Chemical Engineering Publicador: Brazilian Society of Chemical Engineering
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/09/2001 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
709.2885%
This paper analyzes the influence of pH, temperature and degree of hydrolyzate concentration on the removal of volatile and nonvolatile compounds from sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolyzate treated with activated charcoal before or after the vacuum evaporation process. Furfural and 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural were almost totally removed in all the experiments, irrespective of pH and temperature and whether the charcoal was added before or after the vacuum evaporation process. Adding activated charcoal before the vacuum evaporation process favored the removal of phenolic compounds for all values of pH. Acetic acid, on the contrary, was most effectively removed when the activated charcoal was added after the vacuum evaporation process at an acid pH (0.92) and at the highest degree of hydrolyzate concentration (f=4). However, addition of activated charcoal before or after vacuum evaporation at an acid pH (0.92) and at the highest degree of hydrolyzate concentration (f=4) favored the removal of both acetic acid and phenolic compounds.

Evaluation of the activated charcoals and adsorption conditions used in the treatment of sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate for xylitol production

Marton,J. M.; Felipe,M. G. A.; Almeida e Silva,J. B.; Pessoa Júnior,A.
Fonte: Brazilian Society of Chemical Engineering Publicador: Brazilian Society of Chemical Engineering
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/03/2006 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
600.9404%
Xylitol has sweetening, anticariogenic and clinical properties that have attracted the attention of the food and pharmaceutical industries. The conversion of sugars from lignocellulosic biomass into xylitol by D-xylose-fermenting yeast represents an alternative to the chemical process for producing this polyol. A good source of D-xylose is sugarcane bagasse, which can be hydrolyzed with dilute acid. However, acetic acid, which is toxic to the yeast, also appears in the hydrolysate, inhibiting microbe metabolism. Xylitol production depends on the initial D-xylose concentration, which can be increased by concentrating the hydrolysate by vacuum evaporation. However, with this procedure the amount of acetic acid is also increased, aggravating the problem of cell inhibition. Hydrolysate treatment with powdered activated charcoal is used to remove or decrease the concentration of this inhibitor, improving xylitol productivity as a consequence. Our work was an attempt to improve the fermentation of Candida guilliermondii yeast in sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate by treating the medium with seven types of commercial powdered activated charcoals (Synth, Carbon Delta A, Carbon Delta G, Carbon 117, Carbon 118L, Carbon 147 and Carvorite), each with its own unique physicochemical properties. Various adsorption conditions were established for the variables temperature...

Effect of different culture tube caps and concentrations of activated charcoal and sucrose on in vitro growth and budding induction of Annona glabra L.

Santana,José Raniere Ferreira de; Paiva,Renato; Souza,Ana Valéria de; Oliveira,Lenaldo Muniz de
Fonte: Editora da Universidade Federal de Lavras Publicador: Editora da Universidade Federal de Lavras
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/10/2011 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
507.5655%
The present work evaluated the effects of different types of culture flask seals and varying concentrations of sucrose and activated charcoal on the in vitro induction and growth of buds of Annona glabra L.; an edible fruit-producing species popularly known as "araticum". Nodal segments obtained from A. glabra plants maintained in green houses were surface sterilized and inoculated into a WPM culture medium solidified with 7 g L-1 of agar and supplemented with sucrose (0.00; 29.21; 58.63 and 116.84 mM), activated charcoal (0.0 and 2.0 g L-1), and 250 mg L-1 benomyl. In addition to the varying concentrations of sucrose and activated charcoal, we evaluated the efficiency of two types of test tube seals: PVC film, and cotton plugs. All possible combinations of caps and nutrient media were tested with 4 repetitions with 5 tubes each, evaluating the number of buds, the percentage of explant responses, the number of expanded leaves per bud, the length of the largest leaves, leaf abscission, and the length and dry weight of the buds. The type of seal influenced organogenesis in nodal segments of A. glabra, and no bud induction was observed in the absence of sucrose. The largest number of expanded leaves were obtained when 58.42 mM of sucrose was used in tubes sealed with cotton plugs...

Evaluation of nutrient supplementation to charcoal-treated and untreated rice straw hydrolysate for xylitol production by Candida guilliermondii

Mussatto,Solange Inês; Roberto,Inês Conceição
Fonte: Instituto de Tecnologia do Paraná - Tecpar Publicador: Instituto de Tecnologia do Paraná - Tecpar
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/05/2005 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
592.90074%
Xylitol was produced by Candida guilliermondii from charcoal-treated and untreated rice straw hemicellulosic hydrolysate with or without nutrients (ammonium sulphate, calcium chloride, rice bran extract). Both, xylitol yield and volumetric productivity decreased significantly when the nutrients were added to treated and untreated hydrolysates. In the treated hydrolysate, the efficiency of xylose conversion to xylitol was 79% when the nutrients were omitted. The results demonstrated that rice straw hemicellulosic hydrolysate treated with activated charcoal was a cheap source of xylose and other nutrients for xylitol production by C. guilliermondii. The non-necessity of adding nutrients to the hydrolysate media would be very advantageous since the process becomes less costly.

Effect of orally administered activated charcoal on vancomycin clearance.

Davis, R L; Roon, R A; Koup, J R; Smith, A L
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /05/1987 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
513.3263%
Vancomycin is a narrow-spectrum antibiotic that has concentration-dependent efficacy and toxicity. Recent literature indicates that orally administered activated charcoal can enhance the clearance of intravenously administered drugs. To evaluate the effects of activated charcoal on vancomycin clearance, six healthy male volunteers received vancomycin (1 g) intravenously with and without activated charcoal coadministration. In a randomized crossover sequence, subjects were given 50 g of activated charcoal immediately before the vancomycin infusion was begun and 15 g at 2, 4, 6, and 8 h afterwards, or an equal volume of water. Multiple doses of charcoal did not have a statistically significant effect on any pharmacokinetic parameter for vancomycin. Mean control values +/- standard deviation for vancomycin clearance, elimination half-life, and 24-h urinary recovery were 6.4 +/- 1.0 liters/h, 6.6 +/- 1.5 h, and 856 +/- 116 mg, respectively. Mean values for the same parameters were 6.4 +/- 1.0 liters/h, 6.0 +/- 0.9 h, and 897 +/- 130 mg when activated charcoal was given. We conclude that multiple doses of orally administered activated charcoal do not enhance vancomycin clearance in subjects with normal renal function when serum concentrations are within the therapeutic range. The results of this investigation cannot be extrapolated to patients with toxic vancomycin concentrations or renal dysfunction. The use of activated charcoal in these populations warrants further study.

Do gastric contents modify antidotal efficacy of oral activated charcoal?

Olkkola, K T; Neuvonen, P J
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /11/1984 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
510.63695%
The effect of food on the antidotal efficacy of activated charcoal was studied in six healthy volunteers, who ingested aspirin 1000 mg, mexiletine 200 mg and tolfenamic acid 400 mg in a randomized cross-over study. Activated charcoal 25 g, suspended in water, was administered 5 min or 60 min after the drugs were taken on an empty stomach or after a standard meal. The serum concentrations and the cumulative excretion into urine of the drugs were followed for 48 h. When the drugs were taken on an empty stomach, activated charcoal given 5 min or 60 min afterwards reduced the bioavailability of the drugs by 75-98% or 10-60%, respectively. Food moderately weakened the effect of activated charcoal administered 5 min after the drugs, but when the charcoal was given 1 h later the effect was still practically the same, the reduction of absorption varying in both cases in the range of 45-85%. Thus the efficacy of charcoal given 60 min after the drugs was better after a standard meal than on an empty stomach. Presence of food in the stomach of patients with drug overdosage modifies the efficacy of activated charcoal and gives it more time to adsorb drugs in the gastrointestinal canal, possibly by slowing gastric emptying rate.

Effect of charcoal-drug ratio on antidotal efficacy of oral activated charcoal in man.

Olkkola, K T
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /06/1985 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
514.88812%
The effect of charcoal-drug ratio on the antidotal efficacy of oral activated charcoal was studied in six healthy volunteers in a randomized cross-over study and compared with the adsorption capacity of activated charcoal in vitro. Aminosalicylic acid (PAS) 1 g and 5 g were ingested on an empty stomach in 30 ml of water. Immediately afterwards the subjects ingested 50 g of activated charcoal in 300 ml of water or 300 ml of water only. PAS 10 g 20 g were only given with 50 g of activated charcoal administered immediately afterwards. The plasma concentrations and the cumulative excretion of PAS into urine were measured for 48 h. Increasing the dose of PAS from 1 g to 20 g reduced the antidotal efficacy of activated charcoal: at a charcoal-drug ratio of 50:1 under 5% of the dose was absorbed but at a ratio of 2.5:1 about 37%. These data correlated well to the saturation of adsorption capacity of charcoal in vitro. To minimize the possibility of saturation of the adsorption capacity of charcoal in acute intoxications where the amount and type of drug taken is usually unknown, large doses (50-100 g) of activated charcoal should be used.

Pharmacokinetics of digoxin cross-reacting substances in patients with acute yellow oleander (Thevetia peruviana) poisoning, including the effect of activated charcoal.

Roberts, Darren M; Southcott, Emma; Potter, Julia M; Roberts, Michael S; Eddleston, Michael; Buckley, Nick A
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /12/2006 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
515.24875%
Intentional self-poisonings with seeds from the yellow oleander tree (Thevetia peruviana) are widely reported. Activated charcoal has been suggested to benefit patients with yellow oleander poisoning by reducing absorption and/or facilitating elimination. Two recent randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the efficacy of activated charcoal reported conflicting outcomes in terms of mortality. The effect of activated charcoal on the pharmacokinetics of Thevetia cardenolides has not been assessed. This information may be useful for determining whether further studies are necessary. Serial blood samples were obtained from patients enrolled in a RCT assessing the relative efficacy of single dose (SDAC) and multiple doses (MDAC) of activated charcoal compared to no activated charcoal (NoAC). The concentration of Thevetia cardenolides was estimated using a digoxin immunoassay. The effect of activated charcoal on cardenolide pharmacokinetics was compared between treatment groups using the AUC24, the 24h Mean Residence Time (MRT24), and regression lines obtained from serial concentration points adjusted for exposure. Erratic and prolonged absorption patterns were noted in each patient group. The apparent terminal half-life was highly variable...

Study protocol: a randomised controlled trial of multiple and single dose activated charcoal for acute self-poisoning

Eddleston, Michael; Juszczak, Edmund; Buckley, Nicholas; Senarathna, Lalith; Mohammed, Fahim; Allen, Stuart; Dissanayake, Wasantha; Hittarage, Ariyasena; Azher, Shifa; Jeganathan, K; Jayamanne, Shaluka; Sheriff, M H Rezvi; Warrell, David
Fonte: Universidade Nacional da Austrália Publicador: Universidade Nacional da Austrália
Tipo: Journal article; Published Version Formato: 8 pages
Relevância na Pesquisa
508.88074%
BACKGROUND: The case fatality for intentional self-poisoning in rural Asia is 10–30 times higher than in the West, mostly due to the use of highly toxic poisons. Activated charcoal is a widely available intervention that may – if given early – bind to poisons in the stomach and prevent their absorption. Current guidelines recommend giving a single dose of charcoal (SDAC) if patients arrive within an hour of ingestion. Multiple doses (MDAC) may increase poison elimination at a later time by interrupting any enterohepatic or enterovascular circulations. The effectiveness of SDAC or MDAC is unknown. Since most patients present to hospital after one hour, we considered MDAC to have a higher likelihood of clinical benefit and set up a study to compare MDAC with no charcoal. A third arm of SDAC was added to help determine whether any benefit noted from MDAC resulted from the first dose or all doses. METHODS/DESIGN: We set up a randomised controlled trial assessing the effectiveness of superactivated charcoal in unselected adult self-poisoning patients admitted to the adult medical wards of three Sri Lankan secondary hospitals. Patients were randomised to standard treatment or standard treatment plus either a single 50 g dose of superactivated charcoal dissolved in 300 ml of water or six doses every four hours. All patients with a history of poison ingestion were approached concerning the study and written informed consent taken from each patient...

Activated charcoal reduces the need for N-acetylcysteine treatment after acetaminophen (paracetamol) overdose.

Buckley, Nicholas A.; Whyte, Ian M.; O'Connell, Dianne; Dawson, Andrew H.
Fonte: Universidade de Adelaide Publicador: Universidade de Adelaide
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //1999 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
512.24227%
Background: The evidence for efficacy of gastric lavage and activated charcoal for gastrointestinal decontamination in poisoning has relied entirely on volunteer studies and/or pharmacokinetic studies and evidence for any clinical benefits or resource savings is lacking. Aim of Study: To investigate the value of gastrointestinal decontamination using gastric lavage and/or activated charcoal in acetaminophen (paracetamol) poisoning. Patients and Methods: We analyzed a series of 981 consecutive acetaminophen poisonings. These patients were treated with gastric lavage and activated charcoal, activated charcoal alone, or no gastrointestinal decontamination. The decision as to which treatment was received was determined by patient cooperation, the treating physician, coingested drugs, and time to presentation after the overdose. Results: Of 981 patients admitted over 10 years, 10% (100) had serum concentrations of acetaminophen that indicated a probable or high risk of hepatotoxicity. The risk of toxic concentrations for patients ingesting less than 10 g of acetaminophen was very low. In patients presenting within 24 hours, who had ingested 10 g or more, those who had been given activated charcoal were significantly less likely to have probable or high risk concentrations (Odds ratio 0.36...

Activated charcoal and graphite for the micropropagation of Cattleya bicolor Lindl. and a orchid double-hybrid 'BLC Pastoral Innocence'

Prizão,Eliane Cristina; Gonçalves,Letícia de Menezes; Gutierre,Maria Auxiliadora Milaneze; Mangolin,Claudete Aparecida; Machado,Maria de Fátima Pires da Silva
Fonte: Editora da Universidade Estadual de Maringá - EDUEM Publicador: Editora da Universidade Estadual de Maringá - EDUEM
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/06/2012 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
715.9932%
No previous studies have investigated the use of graphite instead of activated charcoal in orchids. In this work, different concentrations of activated charcoal or graphite were added to KC medium to darken the culture medium and stimulate the in vitro propagation of Cattleya bicolor and of a double hybrid orchid ('BLC Pastoral Innocence'). The seedlings were inoculated on growth regulator-free KC medium; the effects of activated charcoal (0.0, 1.5, 3.0, 4.5, 6.0, and 7.5 g L-1) and graphite (0.0, 1.5, 3.0, 4.5, 6.0, and 7.5 g L-1) concentrations were tested separately. Each flask contained fifteen seedlings, and the experiments had a randomised, two-way factorial design. The two tested variables were culture medium and illumination levels; eleven culture levels (different concentrations of graphite or activate charcoal) and two illumination levels (14-hr photoperiod or continuous illumination) were evaluated. Three replicates of each combination were utilised. After six months of culture, the average numbers of induced buds and roots per seedling were recorded for each concentration of activated charcoal or graphite. Whereas the largest number of buds in C. bicolor seedlings occurred on media containing 6.0 or 7.5 g L-1 graphite, the largest number of roots occurred on media containing 6.0 g L-1 activated charcoal. In the hybrid 'BLC Pastoral Innocence'...

Pharmacokinetics of Digoxin Cross-Reacting Substances in Patients With Acute Yellow Oleander (Thevetia peruviana) Poisoning, Including the Effect of Activated Charcoal

Roberts, Darren; Southcott, E; Potter, Julia; Roberts, M S; Eddleston, Michael; Buckley, Nicholas
Fonte: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Publicador: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Relevância na Pesquisa
699.29125%
Intentional self-poisonings with seeds from the yellow oleander tree (Thevetia peruviana) are widely reported. Activated charcoal has been suggested to benefit patients with yellow oleander poisoning by reducing absorption and/or facilitating elimination.

Activated charcoal decreases the risk of QT prolongation after citalopram overdose

Ibister, Geoffrey K.; Friberg, Lena E.; Stokes, Barrie; Buckley, Nicholas; Lee, Christopher; Gunja, Naren; Brown, Simon G.; MacDonald, Ellen; Graudins, Andis; Holdgate, Anna; Duffull, Stephen B.
Fonte: Mosby Inc Publicador: Mosby Inc
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Relevância na Pesquisa
584.63016%
Study objective: We determine whether single-dose activated charcoal (SDAC) administration after citalopram overdose reduces the proportion of patients developing abnormal QT prolongation. Methods: Data were collected retrospectively for citalopram overdo

Compliance for single and multiple dose regimens ofsuperactivated charcoal: A prospective study of patients in a clinical trial

Mohamed, Fahim; Sooriyarachchi, M. Roshini; Senarathna, Lalith; Azhar, Shifa; Sheriff, M H Rezvi; Buckley, Nicholas; Eddleston, Michael
Fonte: Informa Healthcare Publicador: Informa Healthcare
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Relevância na Pesquisa
600.01203%
Background. Although activated charcoal is widely used for the treatment of self-poisoning, its effectiveness is unknown. An important consideration is patient compliance since poor compliance will limit effectiveness. We aimed to describe compliance in a

A randomized clinical trial of activated charcoal for the routine management of oral drug overdose

Cooper, Gabrielle; Le Couteur, D; Richardson, D; Buckley, Nicholas
Fonte: Oxford University Press Publicador: Oxford University Press
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Relevância na Pesquisa
607.5655%
Background: Activated charcoal (AC) is commonly used for the routine management of oral drug overdose. Aim: To determine whether the routine use of activated charcoal has an effect on patient outcomes. Design: Randomized controlled unblinded trial. Methods: We recruited all adult patients presenting with an oral overdose at The Canberra Hospital, excluding only transfers, late presenters, those who had ingested drugs not adsorbed by activated charcoal or where administration was contraindicated, and very serious ingestions (at the discretion of the admitting physician). Patients were randomized to either activated charcoal or no decontamination. Results: The trial recruited 327 patients over 16 months. Of 411 presentations, four refused consent, 27 were protocol violations and 53 were excluded from the trial. Only seven were excluded due to the severity of their ingestion. The most common substances ingested were benzodiazepines, paracetamol and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants. More than 80% of patients presented within 4 h following ingestion. There were no differences between AC and no decontamination in terms of length of stay (AC 6.75 h, IQR 4-14 vs. controls 5.5 h, IQR 3-12; p = 0.11) or secondary outcomes including vomiting...

Preparation, Characterization of Bentonite Clay/Activated Charcoal Composites and 2ˆ3 Factorial Design Application in Adsorption Studies of Methylene Blue Dye; Preparação e Caracterização de Compósitos de Argila Bentonita/Carvão Ativado e Aplicação de Planejamento Fatorial 2^3 em Estudo de Adsorção do Corante Azul de Metileno

Neucineia V. Chagas; Universidade Estadual do Centro-Oeste; Jeferson S. Meira; Universidade Estadual do Centro-Oeste; Fauze J. Anaissi; Universidade Estadual do Centro-Oeste; Fábio Luiz Melquiades; Universidade Estadual do Centro-Oeste; Sueli P. Quinaia;
Fonte: Revista Virtual de Química Publicador: Revista Virtual de Química
Tipo: ; Formato: binary/octet-stream
Publicado em 06/01/2015 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
587.06465%
In recent years, several studies involving the preparation and use of composite clay have been the subject of scientific targets. This is due to an increasing social and environmental concern, due to high rate of depletion of oil resources and new environmental regulations, which are forced to search for new compounds that offer no risk to the environment. Thus, in this work we describe the preparation and characterization of composite clay/activated carbon (CA) and its precursors by techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), thermal analysis (TG-DTA). The XRD profile of the composite showed different characteristics in relation to its precursor clay and activated carbon, a displacement of the diffraction peaks occurs, suggesting carbon intercalation between the clay layers. The great conditions for the adsorption of methylene blue dye by AC50 composite were determined by factorial design. The higher adsorption efficiency was obtained under the conditions of 40 °C, pH 8.0 and ionic strength equal to 0.01. DOI: 10.5935/1984-6835.20140104; Nos últimos anos, um grande número de trabalhos envolvendo a preparação e utilização de compósitos de argila tem sido objeto de estudos científicos. Isto é decorrente de uma crescente preocupação social e ambiental...

Evaluation of activated charcoal as treatment for Yellow tulp (Moraea pallida) poisoning in cattle

Snyman,L D; Schultz,R A; Botha,C J; Labuschagne,L; Joubert,J P J
Fonte: Journal of the South African Veterinary Association Publicador: Journal of the South African Veterinary Association
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/01/2009 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
699.29125%
The efficacy of activated charcoal as a treatment for cattle (n = 57) poisoned by Yellow tulp (Moraea pallida) was investigated. Treatment with activated charcoal resulted in full recovery, irrespective of the degree of posterior paresis, provided that this clinical sign did not develop within the first 12 hours after initial exposure to Yellow tulp-infested grazing. For instance, despite treatment, 1 of 7 cattle succumbed after manifesting mild posterior paresis 6 to 8 h after initial exposure and 3 of 3 treated cattle died after developing severe posterior paresis within 6 to 12 h.