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Syndromic surveillance: etiologic study of acute febrile illness in dengue suspicious cases with negative serology. Brazil, Federal District, 2008

Silva,Ailton Domicio da; Evangelista,Maria do Socorro Nantua
Fonte: Instituto de Medicina Tropical Publicador: Instituto de Medicina Tropical
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/10/2010 EN
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With the aim of identifying the etiology of acute febrile illness in patients suspected of having dengue, yet with non reagent serum, a descriptive study was conducted with 144 people using secondary serum samples collected during convalescence. The study was conducted between January and May of 2008. All the exams were re-tested for dengue, which was confirmed in 11.8% (n = 17); the samples that remained negative for dengue (n = 127) were tested for rubella, with 3.9% (n = 5) positive results. Among those non reactive for rubella (n = 122), tests were made for leptospirosis and hantavirus. Positive tests for leptospirosis were 13.9% (n = 17) and none for hantavirus. Non reactive results (70.8%) were considered as Indefinite Febrile Illness (IFI). Low schooling was statistically associated with dengue, rubella and leptospirosis (p = 0.009), dyspnea was statistically associated with dengue and leptospirosis (p = 0.012), and exanthem/petechia with dengue and rubella (p = 0.001). Among those with leptospirosis, activities in empty or vacant lots showed statistical association with the disease (p = 0.013). Syndromic surveillance was shown to be an important tool in the etiologic identification of IFI in the Federal District of Brazil.

Implementing Syndromic Surveillance: A Practical Guide Informed by the Early Experience

Mandl, Kenneth D.; Overhage, J. Marc; Wagner, Michael M.; Lober, William B.; Sebastiani, Paola; Mostashari, Farzad; Pavlin, Julie A.; Gesteland, Per H.; Treadwell, Tracee; Koski, Eileen; Hutwagner, Lori; Buckeridge, David L.; Aller, Raymond D.; Grannis, S
Fonte: American Medical Informatics Association Publicador: American Medical Informatics Association
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2004 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.71%
Syndromic surveillance refers to methods relying on detection of individual and population health indicators that are discernible before confirmed diagnoses are made. In particular, prior to the laboratory confirmation of an infectious disease, ill persons may exhibit behavioral patterns, symptoms, signs, or laboratory findings that can be tracked through a variety of data sources. Syndromic surveillance systems are being developed locally, regionally, and nationally. The efforts have been largely directed at facilitating the early detection of a covert bioterrorist attack, but the technology may also be useful for general public health, clinical medicine, quality improvement, patient safety, and research. This report, authored by developers and methodologists involved in the design and deployment of the first wave of syndromic surveillance systems, is intended to serve as a guide for informaticians, public health managers, and practitioners who are currently planning deployment of such systems in their regions.

Timeliness of Emergency Department Diagnoses for Syndromic Surveillance

Travers, Debbie; Barnett, Clifton; Ising, Amy; Waller, Anna
Fonte: American Medical Informatics Association Publicador: American Medical Informatics Association
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2006 EN
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46.75%
Emergency Department (ED) data are key components of syndromic surveillance systems. While diagnosis data are widely available in electronic form from EDs and often used as a source of clinical data for syndromic surveillance, our previous survey of North Carolina EDs found that the data were not available in a timely manner for early detection. The purpose of this study was to measure the time of availability of participating EDs’ diagnosis data in a state-based syndromic surveillance system. We found that a majority of the ED visits transmitted to the state surveillance system for 12/1/05 did not have a diagnosis until more than a week after the visit. Reasons for the lack of timely transmission of diagnoses included coding problems, logistical issues and the lack of IT personnel at smaller hospitals.

Review of syndromic surveillance: implications for waterborne disease detection

Berger, Magdalena; Shiau, Rita; Weintraub, June M
Fonte: BMJ Group Publicador: BMJ Group
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /06/2006 EN
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Syndromic surveillance is the gathering of data for public health purposes before laboratory or clinically confirmed information is available. Interest in syndromic surveillance has increased because of concerns about bioterrorism. In addition to bioterrorism detection, syndromic surveillance may be suited to detecting waterborne disease outbreaks. Theoretical benefits of syndromic surveillance include potential timeliness, increased response capacity, ability to establish baseline disease burdens, and ability to delineate the geographical reach of an outbreak. This review summarises the evidence gathered from retrospective, prospective, and simulation studies to assess the efficacy of syndromic surveillance for waterborne disease detection. There is little evidence that syndromic surveillance mitigates the effects of disease outbreaks through earlier detection and response. Syndromic surveillance should not be implemented at the expense of traditional disease surveillance, and should not be relied upon as a principal outbreak detection tool. The utility of syndromic surveillance is dependent on alarm thresholds that can be evaluated in practice. Syndromic data sources such as over the counter drug sales for detection of waterborne outbreaks should be further evaluated.

Modeling and Syndromic Surveillance for Estimating Weather-Induced Heat-Related Illness

Perry, Alexander G.; Korenberg, Michael J.; Hall, Geoffrey G.; Moore, Kieran M.
Fonte: Hindawi Publishing Corporation Publicador: Hindawi Publishing Corporation
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.79%
This paper compares syndromic surveillance and predictive weather-based models for estimating emergency department (ED) visits for Heat-Related Illness (HRI). A retrospective time-series analysis of weather station observations and ICD-coded HRI ED visits to ten hospitals in south eastern Ontario, Canada, was performed from April 2003 to December 2008 using hospital data from the National Ambulatory Care Reporting System (NACRS) database, ED patient chief complaint data collected by a syndromic surveillance system, and weather data from Environment Canada. Poisson regression and Fast Orthogonal Search (FOS), a nonlinear time series modeling technique, were used to construct models for the expected number of HRI ED visits using weather predictor variables (temperature, humidity, and wind speed). Estimates of HRI visits from regression models using both weather variables and visit counts captured by syndromic surveillance as predictors were slightly more highly correlated with NACRS HRI ED visits than either regression models using only weather predictors or syndromic surveillance counts.

Evaluating the New York City Emergency Department Syndromic Surveillance for Monitoring Influenza Activity during the 2009-10 Influenza Season

Westheimer, Emily; Paladini, Marc; Balter, Sharon; Weiss, Don; Fine, Anne; Nguyen, Trang Quyen
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 17/08/2012 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
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Objective: To use laboratory data to assess the specificity of syndromes used by the New York City emergency department (ED) syndromic surveillance system to monitor influenza activity. Design: For the period from October 1, 2009 through March 31, 2010, we examined the correlation between citywide ED syndrome assignment and laboratory-confirmed influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). In addition, ED syndromic data from five select NYC hospitals were matched at the patient and visit level to corresponding laboratory reports of influenza and RSV. The matched dataset was used to evaluate syndrome assignment by disease and to calculate the sensitivity and specificity of the influenza-like illness (ILI) syndrome. Results: Citywide ED visits for ILI correlated well with influenza laboratory diagnoses (R=0.92). From October 1, 2009, through March 31, 2010, there were 264,532 ED visits at the five select hospitals, from which the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) received confirmatory laboratory reports of 655 unique cases of influenza and 1348 cases of RSV. The ED visit of most (56%) influenza cases had been categorized in the fever/flu syndrome; only 15% were labeled ILI. Compared to other influenza-related syndromes...

Investigation of disease outbreaks detected by “syndromic” surveillance systems

Pavlin, Julie A.
Fonte: Springer-Verlag Publicador: Springer-Verlag
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /03/2003 EN
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Syndromic surveillance systems can detect potential disease outbreaks quickly and can provide useful tools to assist in outbreak investigation. The steps used to investigate diseases detected through these newer methods are not that different from traditional investigative measures, but the differences and limitations of the systems must be understood. With syndromic surveillance systems, there is often readily available electronic demographic information that can help define the epidemic and direct disease control measures. The diagnosis needs to be confirmed as quickly as possible, however, as specific diagnostic information will be missing with early detection from nonspecific data. It is also important not to disregard smaller, nonsevere rises in disease incidence as they might be a harbinger of a worsening outbreak. The rapidity of most syndromic surveillance systems also requires an equally rapid response, and planning must be done to prioritize alert categories and the response sequence to best utilize the information available in these new systems.

Syndromic surveillance using minimum transfer of identifiable data: The example of the national bioterrorism syndromic surveillance demonstration program

Platt, Richard; Bocchino, Carmella; Caldwell, Blake; Harmon, Robert; Kleinman, Ken; Lazarus, Ross; Nelson, Andrew F.; Nordin, James D.; Ritzwoller, Debra P.
Fonte: Springer-Verlag Publicador: Springer-Verlag
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /03/2003 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.71%
Several health plants and other organizations are collaborating with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to develop a syndromic surveillance system with national coverage that includes more than 20 million people. A principal design feature of this system is reliance on daily reporting of counts of individuals with syndromes of interest in specified geographic regions rather than reporting of individual encounter-level information. On request from public health agencies, health plans and telephone triage services provide additional information regarding individuals who are part of apparent clusters of illness. This reporting framework has several advantages, including less sharing of protected health information, less risk that confidential information will be distributed inappropriately, the prospect of better public acceptance, greater acceptance by health plans, and less effort and cost for both health plans and public health agencies. If successful, this system will allow any organization with appropriate data to contribute vital information to public health syndromic surveillance systems while preserving individuals’ privacy to the greatest extent possible.

Enhanced drop-in syndromic surveillance in New York City following September 11, 2001

Das, Debjani; Weiss, Don; Mostashari, Farzad; Treadwell, Tracee; McQuiston, Jennifer; Hutwagner, Lori; Karpati, Adam; Bornschlegel, Katherine; Seeman, Mathew; Turcios, Reina; Terebuh, Pauline; Curtis, Robin; Heffernan, Richard; Balter, Sharon
Fonte: Springer-Verlag Publicador: Springer-Verlag
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /03/2003 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.71%
After the 2001 World Trade Center disaster, the New York City Department of Health was under heightened alert for bioterrorist attacks in the city. An emergency department (ED) syndromic surveillance system was implemented with the assistance of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to ensure early recognition of an increase or clustering of disease syndromes that might represent a disease outbreak, whether natural or intentional. The surveillance system was based on data collected 7 days a week at area EDs. Data collected were translated into syndromes, entered into an electronic database, and analyzed for aberrations in space and time within 24 hours. From September 14–27, personnel were stationed at 15 EDs on a 24-hour basis (first staffing period); from September 29–October 12, due to resource limitations, personnel were stationed at 12 EDs on an 18-hour basis (second staffing period). A standardized form was used to obtain demographic information and classify each patient visit into 12 syndrome categories. Seven of these represented early manifestations of bioterrorist agents. Data transfer and analysis for time and space clustering (alarms) by syndrome and age occurred daily. Retrospective analyses examined syndrome trends...

Syndromic surveillance: A local perspective

Mostashari, Farzad; Hartman, Jessica
Fonte: Springer-Verlag Publicador: Springer-Verlag
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /03/2003 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.75%
The promise of syndromic surveillance extends beyond early warning for bioterrorist attacks. Even if bioterrorism is first detected by an astute clinician, syndromic surveillance can help delineate the size, location, and tempo of the epidemic or provide reassurance that a large outbreak is not occurring when a single case or a small, localized cluster of an unusual illness is detected. More broadly, however, as public health and medicine proceed in our information age, the use of existing electronic data for public health surveillance will not appear to be an untested experiment for long. The challenge is to allow these systems to flower without burdening them with unrealistic expectations, centralized control, and unbalanced funding. To help syndromic surveillance systems reach their full potential, we need data standards, guidance to the developers of clinical information systems that will ensure data flow and interoperability, evaluations of best practices, links to improved laboratory diagnostics, regulations that protect privacy and data security, and reliable sustained funding for public health infrastructure to ensure the capacity to respond when the alarm sounds.

Using Chief Complaints for Syndromic Surveillance: A Review of Chief Complaint Based Classifiers in North America

Conway, Mike; Dowling, John N.; Chapman, Wendy W.
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.71%
A major goal of Natural Language Processing in the public health informatics domain is the automatic extraction and encoding of data stored in free text patient records. This extracted data can then be utilized by computerized systems to perform syndromic surveillance. In particular, the chief complaint — a short string that describes a patient’s symptoms — has come to be a vital resource for syndromic surveillance in the North American context due to its near ubiquity. This paper reviews fifteen systems in North America — at the city, county, state and federal level — that use chief complaints for syndromic surveillance.

Syndromic Surveillance for Influenza in the Emergency Department–A Systematic Review

Hiller, Katherine M.; Stoneking, Lisa; Min, Alice; Rhodes, Suzanne Michelle
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 13/09/2013 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
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The science of surveillance is rapidly evolving due to changes in public health information and preparedness as national security issues, new information technologies and health reform. As the Emergency Department has become a much more utilized venue for acute care, it has also become a more attractive data source for disease surveillance. In recent years, influenza surveillance from the Emergency Department has increased in scope and breadth and has resulted in innovative and increasingly accepted methods of surveillance for influenza and influenza-like-illness (ILI). We undertook a systematic review of published Emergency Department-based influenza and ILI syndromic surveillance systems. A PubMed search using the keywords “syndromic”, “surveillance”, “influenza” and “emergency” was performed. Manuscripts were included in the analysis if they described (1) data from an Emergency Department (2) surveillance of influenza or ILI and (3) syndromic or clinical data. Meeting abstracts were excluded. The references of included manuscripts were examined for additional studies. A total of 38 manuscripts met the inclusion criteria, describing 24 discrete syndromic surveillance systems. Emergency Department-based influenza syndromic surveillance has been described worldwide. A wide variety of clinical data was used for surveillance...

Devising an Indicator to Detect Mid-Term Abortions in Dairy Cattle: A First Step Towards Syndromic Surveillance of Abortive Diseases

Bronner, Anne; Morignat, Eric; Hénaux, Viviane; Madouasse, Aurélien; Gay, Emilie; Calavas, Didier
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 06/03/2015 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.77%
Bovine abortion surveillance is essential for human and animal health because it plays an important role in the early warning of several diseases. Due to the limited sensitivity of traditional surveillance systems, there is a growing interest for the development of syndromic surveillance. Our objective was to assess whether, routinely collected, artificial insemination (AI) data could be used, as part of a syndromic surveillance system, to devise an indicator of mid-term abortions in dairy cattle herds in France. A mid-term abortion incidence rate (MAIR) was computed as the ratio of the number of mid-term abortions to the number of female-weeks at risk. A mid-term abortion was defined as a return-to-service (i.e. a new AI) taking place 90 to 180 days after the previous AI. Weekly variations in the MAIR in heifers and parous cows were modeled with a time-dependent Poisson model at the département level (French administrative division) during the period of 2004 to 2010. The usefulness of monitoring this indicator to detect a disease-related increase in mid-term abortions was evaluated using data from the 2007–2008 episode of bluetongue serotype 8 (BT8) in France. An increase in the MAIR was identified in heifers and parous cows in 47% (n = 24) and 71% (n = 39) of the départements. On average...

Syndromic surveillance of influenza activity in Sweden: an evaluation of three tools

MA, T.; ENGLUND, H.; BJELKMAR, P.; WALLENSTEN, A.; HULTH, A.
Fonte: Cambridge University Press Publicador: Cambridge University Press
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.73%
An evaluation was conducted to determine which syndromic surveillance tools complement traditional surveillance by serving as earlier indicators of influenza activity in Sweden. Web queries, medical hotline statistics, and school absenteeism data were evaluated against two traditional surveillance tools. Cross-correlation calculations utilized aggregated weekly data for all-age, nationwide activity for four influenza seasons, from 2009/2010 to 2012/2013. The surveillance tool indicative of earlier influenza activity, by way of statistical and visual evidence, was identified. The web query algorithm and medical hotline statistics performed equally well as each other and to the traditional surveillance tools. School absenteeism data were not reliable resources for influenza surveillance. Overall, the syndromic surveillance tools did not perform with enough consistency in season lead nor in earlier timing of the peak week to be considered as early indicators. They do, however, capture incident cases before they have formally entered the primary healthcare system.

Directionally Sensitive Multivariate Statistical Process Control Methods with Application to Syndromic Surveillance

Fricker, Ronald D. Jr.
Fonte: Escola de Pós-Graduação Naval Publicador: Escola de Pós-Graduação Naval
Tipo: Journal Paper
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.91%
Advances in Disease Surveillance, 3, 1-17.; Current syndromic surveillance systems run multiple simultaneous univariate procedures, each focused on detecting an outbreak in a single data stream. Multivariate procedures have the potential to better detect some types of outbreaks, but most of the existing methods are directionally invariant and are thus less relevant to the problem of syndromic surveillance. This article develops two directionally sensitive multivariate procedures and compares the performance of these procedures both with the original directionally invariant procedures and with the application of multiple univariate procedures using both simulated and real syndromic surveillance data. The performance comparison is conducted using metrics and terminology from the statistical process control (SPC) literature with the intention of helping to bridge the SPC and syndromic surveillance literatures. This article also introduces a new metric, the average overlapping run length (AORL), developed to compare the performance of various procedures on limited actual syndromic surveillance data. Among the procedures compared, in the simulations the directionally sensitive multivariate cumulative sum (MCUSUM) procedure was preferred...

Meeting the International Health Regulations (2005) surveillance core capacity requirements at the subnational level in Europe: the added value of syndromic surveillance

Ziemann, Alexandra; Rosenkötter, Nicole; García-Castrillo Riesgo, Luis Gerardo; Fischer, Matthias; Krämer, Alexander; Lippert, Freddy K.; Vergeiner, Gernot; Brand, Helmut; Krafft, Thomas
Fonte: BioMed Central Publicador: BioMed Central
Tipo: info:eu-repo/semantics/article; publishedVersion
ENG
Relevância na Pesquisa
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BACKGROUND: The revised World Health Organization's International Health Regulations (2005) request a timely and all-hazard approach towards surveillance, especially at the subnational level. We discuss three questions of syndromic surveillance application in the European context for assessing public health emergencies of international concern: (i) can syndromic surveillance support countries, especially the subnational level, to meet the International Health Regulations (2005) core surveillance capacity requirements, (ii) are European syndromic surveillance systems comparable to enable cross-border surveillance, and (iii) at which administrative level should syndromic surveillance best be applied? DISCUSSION: Despite the ongoing criticism on the usefulness of syndromic surveillance which is related to its clinically nonspecific output, we demonstrate that it was a suitable supplement for timely assessment of the impact of three different public health emergencies affecting Europe. Subnational syndromic surveillance analysis in some cases proved to be of advantage for detecting an event earlier compared to national level analysis. However, in many cases, syndromic surveillance did not detect local events with only a small number of cases. The European Commission envisions comparability of surveillance output to enable cross-border surveillance. Evaluated against European infectious disease case definitions...

Biological terrorism preparedness evaluating the performance of the Early Aberration Reporting System (EARS) syndromic surveillance algorithms

Hegler, Benjamin L.
Fonte: Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School Publicador: Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School
Tipo: Tese de Doutorado Formato: xx, 123 p. : ill. ;
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After the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, questions developed over how quickly the country could respond if a bioterrorism attack was to occur. "Syndromic surveillance" systems are a relatively new concept that is being implemented and used by public health practitioners to attempt to detect a bioterrorism attack earlier than would be possible using conventional biosurveillance methods. The idea behind using syndromic surveillance is to detect a bioterrorist attack by monitoring potential leading indicators of an outbreak such as absenteeism from work or school, over-the-counter drug sales, or emergency room counts. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention's Early Aberration Reporting System (EARS) is one syndromic surveillance system that is currently in operation around the United States. This thesis compares the performance of three syndromic surveillance detection algorithms, entitled C1, C2, and C3, that are implemented in EARS, versus the CUSUM applied to model-based prediction errors. The CUSUM performed significantly better than the EARS' methods across all of the scenarios evaluated. These scenarios consisted of various combinations of large and small background disease incidence rates, seasonal cycles from large to small (as well as no cycle)...

Forecasting Hospital Emergency Department Visits for Respiratory Illness Using Ontario's Telehealth System: An Application of Real-Time Syndromic Surveillance to Forecasting Health Services Demand

PERRY, ALEXANDER
Fonte: Quens University Publicador: Quens University
Tipo: Tese de Doutorado Formato: 8189225 bytes; application/pdf
EN; EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
66.75%
Background: Respiratory illnesses can have a substantial impact on population health and burden hospitals in terms of patient load. Advance warnings of the spread of such illness could inform public health interventions and help hospitals manage patient services. Previous research showed that calls for respiratory complaints to Telehealth Ontario are correlated up to two weeks in advance with emergency department visits for respiratory illness at the provincial level. Objectives: This thesis examined whether Telehealth Ontario calls for respiratory complaints could be used to accurately forecast the daily and weekly number of emergency department visits for respiratory illness at the health unit level for each of the 36 health units in Ontario up to 14 days in advance in the context of a real-time syndromic surveillance system. The forecasting abilities of three different time series modeling techniques were compared. Methods: The thesis used hospital emergency department visit data from the National Ambulatory Care Reporting System database and Telehealth Ontario call data and from June 1, 2004 to March 31, 2006. Parallel Cascade Identification (PCI), Fast Orthogonal Search (FOS), and Numerical Methods for Subspace State Space System Identification (N4SID) algorithms were used to create prediction models for the daily number of emergency department visits using Telehealth call counts and holiday/weekends as predictors. Prediction models were constructed using the first year of the study data and their accuracy was measured over the second year of data. Factors associated with prediction accuracy were examined. Results: Forecast error varied widely across health units. Prediction error increased with lead time and lower call-to-visits ratio. Compared with N4SID...

Comparing Syndromic Surveillance Detection Methods: EARS' Versus a CUSUM-Based Methodology

Fricker, Ronald D. Jr.; Hegler, Benjamin L.; Dunfee, David A.
Fonte: Escola de Pós-Graduação Naval Publicador: Escola de Pós-Graduação Naval
Tipo: Journal Paper
Relevância na Pesquisa
66.71%
Statistics in Medicine, 27, 3407-3429.; The article of record as published may be located at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/sim.3197; This paper compares the performance of three detection methods, entitled C1, C2, and C3, that are implemented in the early aberration reporting system (EARS) and other syndromic surveillance systems versus the CUSUM applied to model-based prediction errors. The cumulative sum (CUSUM) performed significantly better than the EARS’ methods across all of the scenarios we evaluated. These scenarios consisted of various combinations of large and small background disease incidence rates, seasonal cycles from large to small (as well as no cycle), daily effects, and various types and levels of random daily variation. This leads us to recommend replacing the C1, C2, and C3 methods in existing syndromic surveillance systems with an appropriately implemented CUSUM method. Published in 2008 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Vigilância sindrômica: estudo etiológico de doenças febris agudas a partir dos casos suspeitos de dengue com sorologia não reagente. Distrito Federal, Brasil, 2008; Syndromic surveillance: etiologic study of acute febrile illness in dengue suspicious cases with negative serology. Brazil, Federal District, 2008

Silva, Ailton Domicio da; Evangelista, Maria do Socorro Nantua
Fonte: Universidade de São Paulo. Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São Paulo Publicador: Universidade de São Paulo. Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São Paulo
Tipo: info:eu-repo/semantics/article; info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion; ; ; ; ; Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 01/10/2010 ENG
Relevância na Pesquisa
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Com o objetivo de identificar a etiologia de doenças febris agudas, em suspeitos de dengue com sorologia não reagente, realizou-se estudo descritivo com 144 pessoas utilizando amostras de soro coletados na convalescença, entre janeiro e março de 2008. Todos os exames foram re-testados para dengue, sendo as amostras negativas, processadas para rubéola (n = 127). Dentre as não reagentes para rubéola, submeteu-se ao teste para leptospirose (n = 122), e em se permanecendo sem diagnóstico, testou-se para hantavirose. Confirmou-se dengue em 11,8% (n = 17), rubéola em 3,9% (n = 5) e leptospirose em 13,9% (n = 17). Os resultados não reagentes foram considerados como doença febril aguda indiferenciada (DFI) em 70.8% dos casos. Verificou-se associação estatística em baixa escolaridade nos casos de dengue, rubéola e leptospirose (p = 0,009), assim como dispnéia para dengue e leptospirose (p = 0,012), e exantema/petéquias para dengue e rubéola (p = 0,001). Dentre os doentes com leptospirose, as atividades em terreno baldio mostraram-se com diferença estatística significante (p = 0,013). A vigilância sindrômica demonstrou-se como importante ferramenta na identificação de doenças febris agudas no Distrito Federal.; With the aim of identifying the etiology of acute febrile illness in patients suspected of having dengue...