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The nymph of Tortopus harrisi Traver (Ephemeroptera: Polymitarcyidae)

MOLINERI, Carlos; SIEGLOCH, Ana E.; RIGHI-CAVALLARO, Karina O.
Fonte: MAGNOLIA PRESS Publicador: MAGNOLIA PRESS
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
ENG
Relevância na Pesquisa
26.95%
Polymitarcyidae is a family of burrowing mayflies (Ephemeroptera: Ephemeroidea) distributed throughout the world but with highest diversity in the Neotropics. Tortopus Needham & Murphy, with a Panamerican distribution, is known from twelve species described in the adult stage. Nymphs are only known for three species: T. puella (Pictet), T. obscuripennis Dominguez and T. sarae Dominguez, and present a rather homogeneous morphology (Molineri 2008). They were firstly described for T. puella by Scott et al. (1959) and later Molineri (2008) described the other two. Both studies reported that these species burrow U-shaped tunnels in clay banks of rivers and streams, thus preventing them from being sampled in most limnological studies (that use surbers, drags, or drift nets). The aim of the present contribution is to describe and illustrate the previously unknown nymph of Tortopus harrisi Traver that shows important anatomical differences with the other nymphs known in the genus. This morphological differentiation suggests a different habitat use by these nymphs, sampled with drag and surber samplers in sandy substrate. New locality records are given for T. harrisi in Brazil. The nymphs are preserved in alcohol, mouthparts, legs and genital rudiments were mounted in microscope slides with Canada Balsam. Drawings were made with a camera lucida attached to a stereo microscope. The material is deposited in CUIC (Cornell University Insect Collection...

A description of the nymph of Anacroneuria ofaye Froehlich (Plecoptera: Perlidae) and a apparatus for rearing Neotropical stonefly species

Novaes, Marcos Carneiro; Bispo, Pitagoras da Conceicao; Higuti, Janet
Fonte: Magnolia Press Publicador: Magnolia Press
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: 71-77
ENG
Relevância na Pesquisa
37.23%
Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq); Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP); Processo FAPESP: 04/09711-8; Processo FAPESP: 09/53233-7; The Neotropical genus Anacroneuria (Perlidae) is represented by more than 300 species. Among the Brazilian Anacroneuria, only the nymphs of two species have been described. In this paper, we described the nymph of A. ofaye Froehlich and an apparatus for rearing this genus. This is the first record of A. ofaye from Parana State, Brazil.

New records of Amblyomma goeldii (Acari: Ixodidae) and description of the nymphal stage

Martins, Thiago F.; Gianizella, Sergio L.; Nunes, Pablo H.; Faria, Diogo C. L. O.; Do Nascimento, Carlos A. R.; Abrahao, Carlos R.; Miranda, Flavia R.; Teixeira, Rodrigo H. F.; Ramirez, Diego G.; Barros-Battesti, Darci M.; Labruna, Marcelo B.
Fonte: Magnolia Press Publicador: Magnolia Press
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: 439-444
ENG
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.23%
Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP); Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq); Since its original description from the Amazonian region, the tick species Amblyomma goeldii Neumann, 1899 has been misidentified with Amblyomma rotundatum Koch, 1844 in different countries of the Neotropical region. Because of this, some authors have considered that the only confirmed records of A. goeldii were from French Guyana. Herein, we reviewed all specimens of A. goeldii that have been deposited at two tick collections in Brazil. In addition, we describe the nymphal stage of A. goeldii for the first time. A total of 10 unpublished records of the adult stage of A. goeldii are recorded from the Amazonian region of Brazil, confirming the occurrence of A. goeldii in this country. Except for one record on the snake Boa constrictor Linnaeus, all records of A. goeldii reported in the present study were from anteaters (Pilosa: Myrmecophagidae). Our results, in conjunction with previous literature records, indicate that anteaters and large snakes are important hosts for the adult stage of A. goeldii. The nymph of A. goeldii is morphologically similar to the nymphs of Amblyomma romitii Tonelli-Rondelli...