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Open Medical Library: Cooperation and Scientific Communication Network through RSS

Alonso-Arevalo, Julio; Carles-Pomar, Angels; Garcia-Puente Sánchez, Maria; Lopes, Carlos Alberto; Martin-Castilla, Sonia; Martin-Rodero, Helena; Vaillès-Serret, Jordi
Fonte: ICML2009 - 10th International Congress on Medical Librarianship Publicador: ICML2009 - 10th International Congress on Medical Librarianship
Tipo: Conferência ou Objeto de Conferência
Publicado em //2009 ENG
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http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:179869; One of the fastest and most performing tools on Web 2.0 is RSS (Really Simple Syndication). It allows the access to digital content without constantly visiting the pages where it is stored. Syndication enables to share all kind of information in XML format, and offers us the opportunity of showing our own content in other web pages in an integrated way, giving an added value to the information. In this communication we would like to present a Network Collaborative Project between medical libraries belonging to different institutions, located in different geographical areas and with different purposes, objectives and interests (some of them focusing on research and teaching and other on medical practice). Our medical libraries have incorporated “the content syndication”, on the one hand, as another tool for medical librarian work and, on the other hand, as a value-added service in order to be useful to different users such as medical staff, teachers, researchers or students. RSS lets us share information channels, creating a space for collaborative research. Syndication is a great help to our users as it develops a new trend in the content management sector, which is changing considerably the relationship with information...

Medical Image Databases: A Content-based Retrieval Approach

Tagare, Hemant D.; Jaffe, C. Carl; Duncan, James
Fonte: American Medical Informatics Association Publicador: American Medical Informatics Association
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //1997 EN
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Information contained in medical images differs considerably from that residing in alphanumeric format. The difference can be attributed to four characteristics: (1) the semantics of medical knowledge extractable from images is imprecise; (2) image information contains form and spatial data, which are not expressible in conventional language; (3) a large part of image information is geometric; (4) diagnostic inferences derived from images rest on an incomplete, continuously evolving model of normality. This paper explores the differentiating characteristics of text versus images and their impact on design of a medical image database intended to allow content-based indexing and retrieval. One strategy for implementing medical image databases is presented, which employs object-oriented iconic queries, semantics by association with prototypes, and a generic schema.

Evaluation of the Unified Medical Language System as a Medical Knowledge Source

Bodenreider, Oliver; Burgun, Anita; Botti, Geneviève; Fieschi, Marius; Beux, Pierre Le; Kohler, François
Fonte: American Medical Informatics Association Publicador: American Medical Informatics Association
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //1998 EN
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Abstract Objective: The authors evaluated the use of the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) as a medical knowledge source for the representation of medical procedures in the MAOUSSC system.

Medical Error: Is the Solution Medical or Cognitive?

Zhang, Jiajie; Patel, Vimla L.; Johnson, Todd R.
Fonte: American Medical Informatics Association Publicador: American Medical Informatics Association
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2002 EN
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Is the solution for medical errors medical or cognitive? In this AMIA2001 panel on medical error, we argued that medical error is primarily an issue for cognitive science and engineering, not for medicine, although the knowledge of the practice of medicine is essential for the research and prevention of medical errors. The three panelists presented studies that demonstrate that cognitive research is the foundation for theories of medical errors and interventions of error reductions.

A National Survey of Medical Education Fellowships

Thompson, Britta M.; Searle, Nancy S.; Gruppen, Larry D.; Nelson, Elizabeth A.; Hatem, Charles Joseph
Fonte: Medical Education Online Publicador: Medical Education Online
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN_US
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Purpose: The purpose of our study was to determine the prevalence, focus, time commitment, graduation requirements and programme evaluation methods of medical education fellowships throughout the United States. Medical education fellowships are defined as a single cohort of medical teaching faculty who participate in an extended faculty development programme. Methods: A 26-item online questionnaire was distributed to all US medical schools (n=127) in 2005 and 2006. The questionnaire asked each school if it had a medical education fellowship and the characteristics of the fellowship programme. Results: Almost half (n=55) of the participating schools (n=120, response rate 94.5%) reported having fellowships. Duration (10-584 hours) and length (<1 month-48 months) varied; most focused on teaching skills, scholarly dissemination and curriculum design, and required the completion of a scholarly project. A majority collected participant satisfaction; few used other programme evaluation strategies. Conclusions: The number of medical education fellowships increased rapidly during the 1990s and 2000s. Across the US, programmes are similar in participant characteristics and curricular focus but unique in completion requirements. Fellowships collect limited programme evaluation data...

Integration of expert knowledge into computer-controlled databases in the medical domain : HEMAVID, a case study

Chueh, Henry C
Fonte: Massachusetts Institute of Technology Publicador: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Tipo: Tese de Doutorado Formato: 67, [105] leaves; 11172292 bytes; 11172052 bytes; application/pdf; application/pdf
ENG
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by Henry C. Chueh.; Thesis (M.S.)--Harvard University--Massachusetts Institute of Technology Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Program in Medical Engineering and Medical Physics, 1989.; Includes bibliographical references (leaves [165]-[172]).

Applicants to the University of Adelaide Medical School: Influences, motivation and alternative career choices

Laurence, C.; Zajac, I.; Turnbull, D.; Sumner, K.; Fleming, J.
Fonte: Australasian and New Zealand Association for Medical Education Publicador: Australasian and New Zealand Association for Medical Education
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2013 EN
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Aims: To determine the motivations and influences on applicants applying to medical school and the alternative tertiary courses chosen by unsuccessful applicants. Background: Medicine is an increasingly popular career choice, with a large number of applicants for each medical school place. It requires specific skills, and the medical school selection processes attempt to identify applicants with the required skills. Methods: A questionnaire-based survey of 2,150 applicants to the University of Adelaide Medical School course in 2007 was conducted, with an overall response rate of 51% (1097/2150). Descriptive analysis was undertaken on applicant motivations for applying to medical school, influences on their application and alternative tertiary courses chosen by unsuccessful applicants. Logistic regression was used to determine which factors were associated with different applicant stages. Results: The most common motivations for applying to medical school were a desire to help others, an affinity for science and enjoying interacting with others. Compared with the unsuccessful group, successful applicants to medical school were significantly more likely to be motivated to study medicine by their enjoyment of science (OR, 4.30) and interacting with people (OR...

Why are some evidence-based care recommendations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease better implemented than others? Perspectives of medical practitioners

Johnston, K.; Young, M.; Grimmer-Somers, K.A.; Antic, R.; Frith, P.A.
Fonte: Dove Medical Press Publicador: Dove Medical Press
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2011 EN
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BACKGROUND: Clinical guidelines for management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) include recommendations based on high levels of evidence, but gaps exist in their implementation. The aim of this study was to examine the perspectives of medical practitioners regarding implementation of six high-evidence recommendations for the management of people with COPD. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with medical practitioners involved with care of COPD patients in hospital and general practice. Interviews sought medical practitioners' experience regarding implementation of smoking cessation, influenza vaccination, pulmonary rehabilitation, guideline-based medications, long-term oxygen therapy for hypoxemia and plan and advice for future exacerbations. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim and analyzed using content analysis. RESULTS: Nine hospital-based medical practitioners and seven general practitioners participated. Four major categories were identified which impacted on implementation of the target recommendations in the care of patients with COPD: (1) role clarity of the medical practitioner; (2) persuasive communication with the patient; (3) complexity of behavioral change required; (4) awareness and support available at multiple levels. For some recommendations...

Ethical enculturation: the informal and hidden ethics curricula at an Australian Medical School

West, C.; Chur-Hansen, A.
Fonte: Australasian and New Zealand Association for Medical Education Publicador: Australasian and New Zealand Association for Medical Education
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2004 EN
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The formal ethics curriculum taught in medical schools is underscored by the informal and hidden curricula – that which is learned outside of the classroom or ward round, and which is often implied rather than explicit. Medical students' ethical and moral development is influenced by these curricula, although they have not been subject to the same scrutiny as the formal curriculum in previous research. The objective of this study was to explore University of Adelaide medical students' opinions of their ethical experiences, focusing on the informal and hidden curricula, and the perceived impact of these on their ethical development. Six undergraduates in their fourth year of a six-year course participated in an open-ended interview. Transcriptions were subjected to a qualitative methodology, Framework analysis, which extracts themes from the data. Seven interconnected themes were found. These were ethical development, the formal ethics curriculum, role- modelling, compromise, speaking out and keeping quiet, self-interest and guilt. Whilst the results of this study are consistent with that of previous research, a new and as yet unexplored result was the juxtaposition of 'local' students' perceptions of their ethical behaviour with their perceptions of 'international' students' ethical behaviour. From this...

General practice career intentions among graduate-entry students: a cross-sectional study at Ireland’s newest medical school

Lane, G; Dunne, Colum; English, A; Finucane, Paul; O'Connor, Ray; Griffin, M; O'Sullivan, B; Hanrahan, C; McGrath, D; O'Donovan, N; Cullen, Walter
Fonte: Irish Medical Organization Publicador: Irish Medical Organization
Tipo: info:eu-repo/semantics/article; all_ul_research; ul_published_reviewed
ENG
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peer-reviewed; Increased care provision and clinical activity in general practice in Ireland will have important manpower implications. Recent developments in medical education policy including the introduction of graduate-entry medical degree programmes may help address this issue. The aim of this study was to determine GP career intentions among students on an Irish graduate-entry medical degree programme and to identify factors that influence these. An electronic cross-sectional study of students at University of Limerick Graduate-Entry Medical School (UL-GEMS) was undertaken. We received 139 replies (78% response rate). 41(29%) reported GP was their current preferred career choice, while 29(19%) reported it was their preferred career choice on entry to medical school. This first study to present data on GP career intentions among graduate-entry students in Ireland highlights the specialty as a popular preferred career choice among students, both on entry to, and during medical school. The study also identifies factors which are likely to be important in determining career intentions. Further research to examine this issue at other graduate-entry medical schools in Ireland and to determine whether our findings are pursued over time amongst graduates is a priority.

A method for the design and development of medical or health care information websites to optimize search engine results page rankings on Google

Dunne, Suzanne S.; Cummins, Niamh M; Hannigan, Ailish; Shannon, Bill; Dunne, Colum; Cullen, Walter
Fonte: Journal of Medical Internet Research Publicador: Journal of Medical Internet Research
Tipo: info:eu-repo/semantics/article; all_ul_research; ul_published_reviewed
ENG
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peer-reviewed; Background: The Internet is a widely used source of information for patients searching for medical/health care information. While many studies have assessed existing medical/health care information on the Internet, relatively few have examined methods for design and delivery of such websites, particularly those aimed at the general public. Objective: This study describes a method of evaluating material for new medical/health care websites, or for assessing those already in existence, which is correlated with higher rankings on Google's Search Engine Results Pages (SERPs). Methods: A website quality assessment (WQA) tool was developed using criteria related to the quality of the information to be contained in the website in addition to an assessment of the readability of the text. This was retrospectively applied to assess existing websites that provide information about generic medicines. The reproducibility of the WQA tool and its predictive validity were assessed in this study. Results: The WQA tool demonstrated very high reproducibility (intraclass correlation coefficient=0.95) between 2 independent users. A moderate to strong correlation was found between WQA scores and rankings on google.com SERPs. Analogous correlations were seen between rankings and readability of websites as determined by Flesch Reading Ease and Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level scores. Conclusions: The use of the WQA tool developed in this study is recommended as part of the design phase of a medical or health care information provision website...

Training Synergies Between Medical Informatics and Health Services Research: Successes and Challenges

Shortliffe, Edward H.; Garber, Alan M.
Fonte: American Medical Informatics Association Publicador: American Medical Informatics Association
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2002 EN
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Stanford's two decades of success in linking medical informatics and health services research in both training and investigational activities reflects advantageous geography and history as well as natural synergies in the two areas. Health services research and medical informatics at Stanford have long shared a quantitative, analytic orientation, along with linked administration, curriculum, and clinical activities. Both the medical informatics and the health services research curricula draw on diverse course offerings throughout the university, and both the training and research overlap in such areas as outcomes research, large database analysis, and decision analysis/decision support. The Stanford experience suggests that successful integration of programs in medical informatics and health services research requires areas of overlapping or synergistic interest and activity among the involved faculty and, hence, in time, among the students. This is enhanced by a mixture of casual and structured contact among students from both disciplines, including social interactions. The challenges to integration are how to overcome any geographic separation that may exist in a given institution; the proper management of relationships with those sub-areas of medical informatics that have less overlap with health services research; and the need to determine how best to exploit opportunities for collaboration that naturally occur.

A national medical register: balancing public transparency and professional privacy

Healy, Judith; Maffi, Costanza; Dugdale, Paul
Fonte: Australasian Medical Association Publicador: Australasian Medical Association
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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• The first aim of a medical registration scheme should be to protect patients. • Medical registration boards currently offer variable information to the public on doctors' registration status. • Current reform proposals for a national registration

Anxiety and depression in medical students related to desire for and expectations from a medical career

Karaoglu,N; Şeker,M
Fonte: West Indian Medical Journal Publicador: West Indian Medical Journal
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/03/2010 EN
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OBJECTIVE: In this article, we aimed to analyse the anxiety and depression levels of medical student's related to their desire for a career in medicine and expectations from that career. METHODS: In a cross-sectional design, students from the first two years of medical school filled-out a questionnaire consisting of demographics, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales (HADS) and questions about their medical career decision. RESULTS: The mean anxiety score was 7.66 ± 3.21 and the mean depression score was 5.77 ± 3.45. According to cut-off levels, 20.3% of medical students had anxiety, 29.3% had depressive symptoms. Males and second year students had significantly high levels of depression (p < 0.05). Students who were pressured to become doctors and who expected to gain much money were both more anxious and more depressed (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: External pressures, desire to become a medical doctor and expectations from a medical education have significant effects on anxiety and depression levels of medical students. Guidance for affected students is important and this is the responsibility of medical educators and faculties.

Preparation for a medical mission to Jamaica - pharmacy's perspective

Borja-Hart,N; Douglas,SM; Marino,J; Garcia,A; Anderson-Worts,P
Fonte: West Indian Medical Journal Publicador: West Indian Medical Journal
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/03/2011 EN
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OBJECTIVES: To describe preparation of a medical mission from a pharmacy team's perspective. METHODS: Essential components of the medication planning process include the development of a separate medication budget, a medication formulary (based on needs assessment and availability) and acquisition of medications and medical supplies. RESULTS: For the medical mission to Jamaica, medications are often purchased or donated from various locations, including retail pharmacies, drug wholesalers, medication drives, pharmaceutical companies, and medication assistance programmes specific to medical missions. It is essential to understand the policy associated with the importation of medications which can be found in the Approval Process for Food, Drugs, Cosmetics, Medical devices, Precursor Chemicals and Narcotics, a paper developed by the Ministry of Health, Jamaica. CONCLUSIONS: Elevated levels of planning and preparation are required for the medical mission to Jamaica to be a success; assistance and cooperation is necessary from all members of the interdisciplinary medical mission team. It is imperative to plan ahead, be organized and equipped to handle unexpected situations so that quality care can be delivered to the patients to be served.

St George's University's Medical Student Research Institute: a novel, virtual programme for medical research collaboration

Chamberlain,RS; Klaassen,Z; Meadows,MC; Weitzman,S; Loukas,M
Fonte: West Indian Medical Journal Publicador: West Indian Medical Journal
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/01/2014 EN
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OBJECTIVE: Medical student research involvement has evolved to be a core component of medical education and is becoming increasingly vital to success in the United States residency match. We sought to develop a research website allowing students and research faculty to collaborate and complete projects online. METHODS: The Medical Student Research Institute (MSRI) was developed by the St George's University School of Medicine in 2009 to encourage, support, facilitate and centralize medical student research. RESULTS: There are 63 active students in the MSRI (22 students in basic science and 41 students in clinical rotations). The mean GPA for basic science student members was 3.81 ± 0.27 and was 3.80 ± 0.20 for clinical student members. The mean United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 score was 241.6 ± 17.5. Since 2009, MSRI students have published 87 manuscripts in 33 different journals and have presented at 14 different national and international conferences. CONCLUSION: A web-based MSRI provides a virtual, entirely online resource for coordinating remote research collaboration between medical students and faculty whose opportunities would be otherwise limited. Initial experiences with the programme have been positive and the framework and concept of the MSRI provides a platform for university and medical schools to provide research opportunities to students who may not have face-to-face access to research faculty.

What does the medical student know about eye donation/corneal transplant? The University of Nigeria scenario

Okoye,O Ike; Maduka-Okafor,FC; Eze,BI
Fonte: West Indian Medical Journal Publicador: West Indian Medical Journal
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/01/2010 EN
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OBJECTIVE: The study was designed to determine the knowledge of eye donation and corneal transplant among final year medical students of The University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus (UNEC). METHODS: Self-administered structured questionnaires were distributed to the members of the final year (graduating) class of the Medical College of UNEC in June 2007. Responses were obtained to questions bordering on eye donation and corneal transplant. RESULTS: One hundred and thirty-one students out of 183 eligible students participated in the study (response rate = 71.6%). One hundred and four students (79.4%) were aware of eye donation/corneal transplant. However, 95 students (72.5%) were not aware that the eyes can only be removed from a dead donor. Eight-yfour students (64.1%) were not aware that eyes with cataract could be donated. Eighty-seven (66.4%) students were not willing to pledge their eyes for donation. CONCLUSION: Medical students lack adequate knowledge about some aspects of eye donation and corneal transplantation. This may be a predictor of the level of awareness among the general public. Concerted innovative education and information dissemination strategies are required at this stage of national development to address the misconceptions surrounding eye donation and corneal transplant. There is a need to target medical students as future motivators...

Students' perception of the 'educational climate' at the Faculty of Medical Sciences, the University of the West Indies, Jamaica

Pierre,RB; Branday,JM; Pottinger,A; Wierenga,A
Fonte: West Indian Medical Journal Publicador: West Indian Medical Journal
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/01/2010 EN
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BACKGROUND: In 2001, the Faculty of Medical Sciences at the Mona Campus of The University of the West Indies (UWI) introduced a restructured curriculum in keeping with advances in the philosophy of medical education. OBJECTIVES: To explore the quality of the educational environment in the Undergraduate Medical Programme at the Mona campus of the UWI to identify areas for improvement and examine for any differences in student perception in a transitional medical curriculum. METHODS: The Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) was self-administered and completed anonymously during April 2004 by 278 (70%) undergraduate medical students (cohorts 2004-2007) registered in the Faculty of Medical Sciences, Mona Campus, Jamaica. RESULTS: The overall mean DREEM score was 102.80 ± 21.88 (maximum score 200; the higher the score, the more favourable the perception) and there was no significant difference by year of study. Teacher knowledge was highly rated by students but this was overshadowed by concerns about attitudes and behaviour toward students. The quality of the learning atmosphere was poorly rated with general concerns of an overcrowded curriculum, time-table issues and lack of adequate support systems to deal with student stress. CONCLUSIONS: Curriculum managers must identify strategies to improve the student-centredness and student-friendliness of the school's educational environment.

Medical tourism in the caribbean region: a call to consider environmental health equity

Johnston,R; Crooks,VA
Fonte: West Indian Medical Journal Publicador: West Indian Medical Journal
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/03/2013 EN
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Medical tourism, which is the intentional travel by privatepaying patients across international borders for medical treatment, is a sector that has been targeted for growth in many Caribbean countries. The international development of this industry has raised a core set of proposed health equity benefits and drawbacks for host countries. These benefits centre on the potential investment in health infrastructure and opportunities for health labour force development while drawbacks focus on the potential for reduced access to healthcare for locals and inefficient use of limited public resources to support the growth of the medical tourism industry. The development of the medical tourism sector in Caribbean countries raises additional health equity questions that have received little attention in existing international debates, specifically in regard to environmental health equity. In this viewpoint, we introduce questions of environmental health equity that clearly emerge in relation to the developing Caribbean medical tourism sector. These questions acknowledge that the growth of this sector will have impacts on the social and physical environments, resources, and waste management infrastructure in countries. We contend that in addition to addressing the wider health equity concerns that have been consistently raised in existing debates surrounding the growth of medical tourism...

Changes needed in basic biomedical sciences teaching in Cuban medical schools

Pernas,Marta; Arencibia,Lourdes G.; Garí,Mayra
Fonte: Medical Education Cooperation with Cuba Publicador: Medical Education Cooperation with Cuba
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/07/2012 EN
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In the 20th century, the basic biomedical sciences (particularly anatomy, histology, embryology, physiology and biochemistry) were taught predominantly in the first semesters of Cuban medical education, with differing curricular connections between these and the clinical sciences. Establishment of the University Polyclinic Program in 2004 laid the foundation for integration of basic biomedical sciences into a transdisciplinary unit designated morphophysiology. This paper argues for improvements in this curricular unit and in its coordination with family medicine in the first semesters of medical training, complemented by integration of basic biomedical sciences into family medicine clinical courses throughout the remainder of the six-year curriculum.