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Image guided tumour ablation

Gillams, A R
Fonte: e-MED Publicador: e-MED
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 21/09/2005 EN
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36.25%
Several different technologies have been employed for the local ablation of tissue by thermal techniques. At the present time the most widely favoured technique is radiofrequency ablation (RFA) but developments in other techniques, e.g. microwave may change this. In many countries RFA or percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) are accepted therapies for patients with Childs Pugh Class A or B cirrhosis and early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Results for RFA in large series of patients with liver metastases from colon cancer are very promising. Five-year survival rates of 26% from the time of first ablation and 30% from the diagnosis of liver metastases for patients with limited (<6, <5 cm) liver disease who are not surgical candidates compares well with post resection series where 5-year survival rates vary between 29% and 39% in operable candidates. Sufficient experience has now been gained in lung and renal ablation to show that these are minimally invasive techniques which can produce effective tumour destruction with a limited morbidity. More novel areas for ablation such as adrenal or pelvic recurrence are being explored.

Extrahepatic biliary obstruction after percutaneous tumour ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma: aetiology and successful treatment with endoscopic papillary balloon dilatation

Sasahira, N; Tada, M; Yoshida, H; Tateishi, R; Shiina, S; Hirano, K; Isayama, H; Toda, N; Komatsu, Y; Kawabe, T; Omata, M
Fonte: Copyright 2005 by Gut Publicador: Copyright 2005 by Gut
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /05/2005 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.09%
Background and aims: Percutaneous tumour ablation (PTA), such as ethanol injection and radiofrequency ablation, is now recognised as a primary treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Although PTA is a relatively safe procedure, it can cause biliary obstruction as a rare complication. As patients with cirrhosis undergoing surgery or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography/sphincterotomy have a high mortality rate from bleeding, we adopted the use of endoscopic papillary balloon dilatation (EPBD) in these patients and now report the results. We retrospectively analysed the incidence of biliary obstruction after PTA and the efficacy of treatment with EPBD.

New horizons in MR-controlled and monitored radiofrequency ablation of liver tumours

Cernicanu, Alexandru; Lepetit-Coiffé, Matthieu; Viallon, Magalie; Terraz, Sylvain; Becker, Christoph D.
Fonte: e-Med Publicador: e-Med
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 05/11/2007 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.22%
There is a sustained interest in using magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry to monitor the radiofrequency ablation of liver tumours as a means of visualizing the progress of the thermal coagulation and deciding the optimal end-point. Despite numerous technical challenges, important progress has been made and demonstrated in animal studies. In addition to MR thermometry, MR can now be used for the guidance of the tumour targeting with ‘fluoroscopic’ rapid image acquisition, and it can provide several contrast mechanisms for post-procedural assessment of the extent of the thermal coagulation zone. Challenges of in vivo simultaneous MR thermometry implementation and the current limitations of the thermal dose model for the estimation of the extent of the thermal coagulation zone are discussed. MR imaging could enhance the success of RF ablation of liver tumours due to its potential to provide accurate targeting, monitoring, and post-procedural evaluation.

Thermal ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma

Crocetti, Laura; Lencioni, Riccardo
Fonte: e-Med Publicador: e-Med
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 27/02/2008 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.29%
Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cause of cancer, and its incidence is increasing worldwide because of the dissemination of hepatitis B and C virus infection. Patients with cirrhosis are at the highest risk of developing HCC and should be monitored every 6 months to diagnose the tumour at an early, asymptomatic stage. Patients with early-stage HCC should be considered for any of the available curative therapies, including surgical resection, liver transplantation and percutaneous image-guided ablation. Liver transplantation is the only option that provides cure of both the tumour and the underlying chronic liver disease. However, the lack of sufficient liver donation greatly limits its applicability. Resection is the treatment of choice for HCC in non-cirrhotic patients, who account for about 5% of the cases in western countries. However, in patients with cirrhosis, candidates for resection have to be carefully selected to reduce the risk of postoperative liver failure. It has been shown that a normal bilirubin concentration and the absence of clinically significant portal hypertension are the best predictors of excellent outcomes after surgery. However, less than 5% of cirrhotic patients with HCC fit these criteria. Image-guided percutaneous ablation is the best therapeutic choice for non-surgical patients with early-stage HCC. While ethanol injection has been the seminal percutaneous technique...

The use of radiofrequency in cancer

Gillams, A R
Fonte: Nature Publishing Group Publicador: Nature Publishing Group
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.21%
Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) provides an effective technique for minimally invasive tissue destruction. An alternating current delivered via a needle electrode causes localised ionic agitation and frictional heating of the tissue around the needle. Image-guided, percutaneous ablation techniques have been developed in most parts of the body, but the most widely accepted applications are for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in early cirrhosis, limited but inoperable colorectal liver metastases, inoperable renal cell carcinoma and inoperable primary or secondary lung tumours. The procedures are well tolerated and the complication rates low. Patients with coexistent morbidity who are not suitable for surgery are often able to undergo RFA. Most treatments in the lung, kidney and for HCC are performed under conscious sedation with an overnight hospital stay or as a day-case. Larger more complicated ablations, for example, in hepatic metastases may require general anaesthesia. Limitations of RFA include the volume of tissue that can be ablated in a timely fashion, that is, most centres will treat 3–5 tumours up to 4–5 cms in diameter. Early series reporting technical success and complications are available for lung and renal ablation. Liver ablation is better established and 5-year survival figures are available from several centres. In patients with limited but inoperable colorectal metastases...

Post-treatment imaging of liver tumours

Schima, Wolfgang; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed; Kurtaran, Amir; Schindl, Martin; Gruenberger, Thomas
Fonte: e-Med Publicador: e-Med
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 01/10/2007 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.24%
In the past few years, great improvements have been made to achieve local tumour control of primary liver malignancies and liver metastases. For hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), transarterial chemoembolisation (TACE) and tumour ablation techniques, including percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI), radiofrequency ablation (RF), and laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) have been developed. For colorectal liver metastases, surgery is still the standard technique in localised disease, although percutaneous RF ablation has gained considerable acceptance. In patients with widespread disease, chemotherapy with new drugs offers improved survival. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the modalities of choice to evaluate treatment response. The present review demonstrates imaging findings of complete and incomplete tumour control after intervention as well as the imaging spectrum of complications. Imaging guidelines according to the World Health Organization and Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) for assessment of chemotherapy response are presented.

Tumour ablation: technical aspects

Widmann, Gerlig; Bodner, Gerd; Bale, Reto
Fonte: e-Med Publicador: e-Med
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 02/10/2009 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.22%
Image-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive, relatively low-risk procedure for tumour treatment. Local recurrence and survival rates depend on the rate of complete ablation of the entire tumour including a sufficient margin of surrounding healthy tissue. Currently a variety of different RFA devices are available. The interventionalist must be able to predict the configuration and extent of the resulting ablation necrosis. Accurate planning and execution of RFA according to the size and geometry of the tumour is essential. In order to minimize complications, individualized treatment strategies may be necessary for tumours close to vital structures. This review examines the state-of-the art of different device technologies, approaches, and treatment strategies for percutaneous RFA of liver tumours.

Tumour ablation: current role in the kidney, lung and bone

Gillams, Alice
Fonte: e-Med Publicador: e-Med
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 02/10/2009 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.14%
The last few years have seen a rapid expansion in the use and availability of ablation techniques with hundreds of papers published. Radiofrequency remains the front-runner in terms of cost, ease of set-up, versatility and flexibility but other techniques are catching up. Ablation with cryotherapy and microwave, which were previously only available at open laparotomy due to the large size of the probes, are now readily performed percutaneously, with a predictable reduction in morbidity. Ablation is now accepted as the first line of treatment in patients with limited volume hepatocellular carcinoma who are not candidates for transplantation. There is continuing debate in most other areas but the evidence is increasing for an important role in liver metastases, renal carcinoma, inoperable lung tumours and some bone tumours.

Quality Improvement Guidelines for Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumours

Crocetti, Laura; de Baere, Thierry; Lencioni, Riccardo
Fonte: Springer-Verlag Publicador: Springer-Verlag
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.24%
The development of image-guided percutaneous techniques for local tumour ablation has been one of the major advances in the treatment of liver malignancies. Among these methods, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is currently established as the primary ablative modality at most institutions. RFA is accepted as the best therapeutic choice for patients with early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) when liver transplantation or surgical resection are not suitable options [1, 2]. In addition, RFA is considered a viable alternate to surgery (1) for inoperable patients with limited hepatic metastatic disease, especially from colorectal cancer, and (2) for patients deemed ineligible for surgical resection because of extent and location of the disease or concurrent medical conditions [3]. These guidelines were written to be used in quality-improvement programs to assess RFA of HCC and liver metastases. The most important processes of care are (1) patient selection, (2) performing the procedure, and (3) monitoring the patient. The outcome measures or indicators for these processes are indications, success rates, and complication rates.

CT-guided radiofrequency liver tumour ablation: use of a two-step coaxial system with a fine guide needle wire unit for high-risk cases

Ishizaka, H; Awata, S; Arai, H; Hirasawa, S; Shimizu, A
Fonte: The British Institute of Radiology. Publicador: The British Institute of Radiology.
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /12/2010 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.26%
Accurate radiofrequency (RF) needle targeting to liver lesions under CT guidance is technically difficult and generally requires multiple needle manipulations, which carries potential risk. This approach is hardly applicable for precariously located lesions or for patients who have difficulty holding their breath. The aim of this study was to develop a novel two-step coaxial system to facilitate CT-guided RF ablation in difficult cases. The study group comprised 11 patients with 12 hepatic lesions. The coaxial system consisted of two parts: a 21-gauge pencil-tip guide needle wire (GNW) unit comprising a 150-mm-long needle segment and a 250-mm-long wire segment; and a 140-mm-long outer cannula with its stylet, which accepts a 17-gauge RF electrode needle. The GNW was inserted until the route of the GNW was confirmed to be positioned correctly. The cannula with the stylet was then advanced along the GNW. Lesions were successfully accessed using the GNW, even in patients who could not hold their breath, and manipulation was feasible within the limited space of the CT gantry. The light GNW also facilitated step-by-step CT-guided angular manipulations, unlike heavy RF electrodes, which are unstable during hands-free use unless deeply inserted. Therefore...

Spontaneous cholecystocolic fistula and locoregional liver tumour ablation: a cautionary tale

Pua, U; Merkle, E M
Fonte: The British Institute of Radiology. Publicador: The British Institute of Radiology.
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /12/2011 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.06%
A liver abscess is a feared and potentially fatal complication following transarterial chemoembolisation (TACE) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of liver tumours. Iatrogenic bilio-enteric communications, such as bilio-enteric anastomosis, sphincterotomy and biliary stents, are considered major risk factors and are due to bacterial colonisation of the biliary tree with enteric flora. Naturally occurring spontaneous cholecysto-enteric fistula poses a similar risk as its iatrogenic counterparts but is rarely described in the literature. We present a case where abscess formation complicated a combined TACE and RFA in an unrecognised cholecystocolic fistula.

Development of a fine thermocouple-needle system for real-time feedback of thermal tumour ablation margin

Ishizaka, H; Shiraishi, A; Awata, S; Shimizu, A; Hirasawa, S
Fonte: The British Institute of Radiology. Publicador: The British Institute of Radiology.
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /12/2011 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
26.2%
Thermal tumour ablation techniques such as radiofrequency (RF) ablation are applied for radical removal of local tumours as an easier, less invasive alternative to surgical resection. A serious drawback of thermal ablation, however, is that the ablation area cannot be accurately assessed during the procedure. To achieve real-time feedback and exact and safe ablation, a superfine thermocouple-needle system (TNS) comprising a 0.25-mm diameter thermocouple embedded in a 22-G, 15-cm-long needle was devised and efficacy was tested in vitro using porcine livers (n = 15) and in vivo using rabbit back muscles (n = 2) and livers (n = 3). A 17-gauge RF electrode with a 2 cm active tip was used for ablation. The TNS was inserted 1 cm from the active tip of the RF electrode and liver temperature around the electrode was measured concurrently. The RF current was cut off when the temperature reached 60°C or after 5 min at ≥50°C. Porcine livers and rabbit back muscles were then cut along a plane passing through the axes of the electrode and the TNS. In rabbit livers, contrast-enhanced CT was performed to evaluate ablation areas. Ablation areas in cut surfaces of porcine livers exhibited well-defined discoloured regions and the TNS tip precisely pinpointed the margin of the ablation area. Contrast-enhanced CT of rabbit livers showed the TNS tip accurately located at the margin of areas without contrast enhancement. These results indicate that the TNS can accurately show ablation margins and that placing the TNS tip at the intended ablation margin permits exact thermal ablation.

High intensity focused ultrasound, liver disease and bridging therapy

Mearini, Luigi
Fonte: Baishideng Publishing Group Co., Limited Publicador: Baishideng Publishing Group Co., Limited
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.23%
High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a non-invasive modality that uses an extracorporeal source of focused ultrasound energy. This technique was introduced by Lynn et al and is able to induce coagulative necrosis in selected tissues without damaging adjacent structures. Although HIFU has been studied for 50 years, recent technological developments now allow its use for tumours of the liver, prostate and other sites. In liver disease, HIFU has been used to treat unresectable, advanced stages of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and liver metastases. Hepatocellular carcinoma is a serious health problem worldwide and is endemic in some areas because of its association with hepatitis B and C viruses (in 20% of cases). Liver transplantation (LT) has become one of the best treatments available because it removes both the tumour and the underlying liver disease such as cirrhosis (which is present in approximately 80% of cases). The prerequisite for long-term transplant success depends on tumour load and strict selection criteria regarding the size and number of tumour nodules. The need to obtain the optimal benefit from the limited number of organs available has prompted strict selection criteria limited to only those patients with early HCC who have a better long-term outcome after LT. The so-called “bridging therapy” has the aim of controlling disease burden for patients who are on the organ transplant waiting list. Amongst various treatment options...

A case of biliary gastric fistula following percutaneous radiofrequency thermal ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma

Falco, Angela; Orlando, Dante; Sciarra, Roberto; Sergiacomo, Luciano
Fonte: Baishideng Publishing Group Co., Limited Publicador: Baishideng Publishing Group Co., Limited
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
26.2%
Percutaneous radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA) is an effective and safe therapeutic modality in the management of liver malignancies, performed with ultrasound guidance. Potential complications of RFA include liver abscess, ascites, pleural effusion, skin burn, hypoxemia, pneumothorax, subcapsular hematoma, hemoperitoneum, liver failure, tumour seeding, biliary lesions. Here we describe for the first time a case of biliary gastric fistula occurred in a 66-year old man with a Child’s class A alcoholic liver cirrhosis as a complication of RFA of a large hepatocellular carcinoma lesion in the III segment. In the light of this case, RFA with injection of saline between the liver and adjacent gastrointestinal tract, as well as laparoscopic RFA, ethanol injection (PEI), or other techniques such as chemoembolization, appear to be more indicated than percutaneous RFA for large lesions close to the gastrointestinal tract.

Dual-energy CT after radiofrequency ablation of liver, kidney, and lung lesions: a review of features

Vandenbroucke, Frederik; Van Hedent, Steven; Van Gompel, Gert; Buls, Nico; Craggs, Gordon; Vandemeulebroucke, Jef; Ros, Pablo R.; de Mey, Johan
Fonte: Springer Berlin Heidelberg Publicador: Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 05/05/2015 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.37%
Early detection of residual tumour and local tumour progression (LTP) after radiofrequency (RF) ablation is crucial in the decision whether or not to re-ablate. In general, standard contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) is used to evaluate the technique effectiveness; however, it is difficult to differentiate post-treatment changes from residual tumour. Dual-energy CT (DECT) is a relatively new technique that enables more specific tissue characterisation of iodine-enhanced structures because of the isolation of iodine in the imaging data. Necrotic post-ablation zones can be depicted as avascular regions by DECT on greyscale- and colour-coded iodine images. Synthesised monochromatic images from dual-energy CT with spectral analysis can be used to select the optimal keV to achieve the highest contrast-to-noise ratio between tissues. This facilitates outlining the interface between the ablation zone and surrounding tissue. Post-processing of DECT data can lead to an improved characterisation and delineation of benign post-ablation changes from LTP. Radiologists need to be familiar with typical post-ablation image interpretations when using DECT techniques. Here, we review the spectrum of changes after RF ablation of liver, kidney...

The emergent role of focal liver ablation techniques in the treatment of primary and secondary liver tumours

Garcea, G.; Lloyd, T.; Aylott, C.; Maddern, G.; Berry, D.
Fonte: Pergamon-Elsevier Science Ltd Publicador: Pergamon-Elsevier Science Ltd
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2003 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.21%
Only 20% of patients with primary or secondary liver tumours are suitable for resection because of extrahepatic disease or the anatomical distribution of their disease. These patients could be treated by ablation of the tumour, thus preserving functioning liver. This study presents a detailed review of established and experimental ablation procedures. The relative merits of each technique will be discussed and clinical data regarding the efficacy of the techniques evaluated. A literature search from 1966 to 2003 was undertaken using Medline, Pubmed and Web of Science databases. Keywords were Hepatocellular carcinoma, liver metastases, percutaneous ethanol injection, cryotherapy, microwave coagulation therapy, radiofrequency ablation, interstitial laser photocoagulation, focused high-intensity ultrasound, hot saline injection, electrolysis and acetic acid injection. Ablative techniques offer a promising therapeutic modality to treat unresectable tumours. Large-scale randomised controlled trials are required before widespread acceptance of these techniques can occur.; http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/104/description#description; G. Garcea, T.D. Lloyd, C. Aylott, G. Maddern and D.P. Berry; Copyright © 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

The safety and efficacy of radiofrequency and electrolytic ablation created adjacent to large hepatic veins in a porcine model

Metcalfe, M.; Mullin, E.; Texler, M.; Berry, D.; Dennison, A.; Maddern, G.
Fonte: Elsevier Science Ltd Publicador: Elsevier Science Ltd
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2007 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.35%
INTRODUCTION: Immediately adjacent to large hepatic veins, tumour ablation by radiofrequency or electrolysis may be impaired by heat or current sink effects. Ablation may also cause vessel injury and thrombosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of radiofrequency and electrolytic ablative techniques adjacent to large hepatic veins. METHODS: Electrolytic and radiofrequency zones of ablation were created adjacent to hepatic veins in large white pigs. After 72 h the zones of ablation created were examined histologically for (a) the extent of tissue necrosis up to the vessel and (b) the presence of intimal damage and mural thrombus in the veins. RESULTS: An unexpected complication of electrolysis near large veins was cardiac tamponade. This current related phenomenon could easily be avoided. In seven of nine electrolysis zones of ablation necrosis was completely adjacent to the vessel wall, but in only four of seven radiofrequency zones of ablation. All zones of ablation were associated with intimal necrosis, and most with mural thrombosis. CONCLUSIONS: Ablation of hepatic tumours by radiofrequency and electrolysis is unreliable adjacent to hepatic veins. Both techniques are associated with mural thrombus formation...

The future of radiofrequency ablation is looking BETA : short and long term studies of bimodal electric tissue ablation (BETA) in a porcine model.

Dobbins, Christopher
Fonte: Universidade de Adelaide Publicador: Universidade de Adelaide
Tipo: Tese de Doutorado
Publicado em //2008
Relevância na Pesquisa
66.57%
Introduction: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a popular method of treating unresectable liver tumours by the use of a high frequency, alternating electrical current that heats and destroys tumour cells. The size of the ablation is limited by localised charring of adjacent tissue that prevents further conduction of the radiofrequency current. In the clinical setting, this results in increased rates of local recurrence in tumours that are greater than 3 cm in diameter as multiple, overlapping ablations need to be performed to treat the one tumour. To overcome this problem, a modified form of RFA called Bimodal Electric Tissue Ablation (BETA) has been created. BETA adds a direct electrical current to the alternating radiofrequency current, thus establishing its bimodal character. When direct currents are used in biological tissues, water is transferred from anode to cathode by a process called electro-osmosis. By attaching the cathode to the radiofrequency electrode, water is attracted to the area thus preventing tissue desiccation and charring. The BETA circuit has been constructed and tested using a porcine model. The aims of the studies are to confirm that larger ablations can be produced with the BETA system and that it is safe to use in an animal model. Three studies have been performed to test these aims in porcine liver. Methods: The first study was designed to compare sizes of the ablation produced between standard RFA and the BETA circuit. This was followed by a long-term study to assess associated changes to liver function and pathological changes within the liver as well as identifying any other treatment related morbidity. The third study assessed the difference in ablation size and safety aspects when the positive electrode of the direct current circuitry was moved from small surface area under the skin to a large surface area on the skin. Results: Ablations with significantly larger diameters are created with the BETA circuit using a multi-tine needle (49.55 mm versus 27.78 mm...

Bimodal electric tissue ablation: Positive electrode studies

Dobbins, C.; Brennan, C.; Wemyss-Holden, S.; Cockburn, J.; Maddern, G.
Fonte: Blackwell Science Asia Publicador: Blackwell Science Asia
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2008 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
56.36%
Background: Bimodal electric tissue ablation is a novel variation to standard radiofrequency ablation that produces significantly larger ablations by the addition of a direct electrical current. The negative electrode is attached to the radiofrequency current and the positive electrode is placed nearby. It has been identified that an electrolytic injury can occur at the positive electrode site. It is suggested that by increasing the surface area that is in contact with the positive electrode, the risk of tissue injury is reduced. This hypothesis was tested in a pig model. Methods: Thirty-six ablations were carried out in the livers of six pigs (six ablations per pig). Two were standard radiofrequency ablation controls and two were carried out with positive electrode attached to a scalpel blade. Two were carried out with positive electrode attached to a grounding pad. After 48 h, liver was harvested and the ablation sizes were compared. Skin biopsies were taken from the scalpel site and one from the pad site and examined histopathologically. Results: The scalpel blade ablations were significantly larger than controls and the grounding pad ablations (P < 0.001). The grounding pad ablation was significantly larger than controls. The scalpel blade skin site showed full-thickness tissue injury. The grounding pad site appeared microscopically normal. Conclusion: By increasing the surface area that connects to the positive electrode...

Correlation between vascular endothelial growth factor levels and prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma patients receiving radiofrequency ablation

Guan, Qinglong; Gu, Junpeng; Zhang, Haixiao; Ren, Weixin; Ji, Weizheng; Fan, Yuxiang
Fonte: Taylor & Francis Publicador: Taylor & Francis
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.15%
This study is aimed to investigate the effect of serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels on prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients receiving radiofrequency ablation (RFA). The 110 HCC patients who received computed tomography (CT) guided RFA were enrolled in this study. The levels of serum VEGF were determined before and after RFA by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). According to the ELISA results, the patients were divided into the negative group and the positive group. The patient's progression-free survival time was determined. It was demonstrated that the serum VEGF had no significant correlation with ages, sex and tumour size. There were no significant peripheral blood supplies around tumour necrosis. The results showed that higher levels of serum VEGF had a worse prognosis when compared to the patients with lower levels of serum VEGF. The difference between the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve and those when area under curves equalled 0.5 was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The serum VEGF level in liver cancer patients can be used as a prognostic indicator for evaluating the efficacy of RFA treatments.