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Ehrlichia canis in dogs attended in a veterinary hospital from Botucatu, Sao Paulo State, Brazil

UENO, Tatiana E. H.; AGUIAR, Daniel M.; PACHECO, Richard C.; RICHTZENHAIN, Leonardo J.; RIBEIRO, Marcio G.; PAES, Antonio C.; MEGID, Jane; LABRUNA, Marcelo B.
Fonte: BRAZILIAN COLL VETERINARY PARASITOLOGY Publicador: BRAZILIAN COLL VETERINARY PARASITOLOGY
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
POR
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This study investigated the etiology of canine ehrlichiosis and possible clinical and epidemiological data associated with the infection in 70 dogs suspect of ehrlichiosis attended at the Veterinary Hospital of the Sao Paulo State University in Botucatu city during 2001 and 2002. Dogs were evaluated by clinical-epidemiological and hematological data and molecular analysis by partial amplification and DNA sequencing of the ehrlichial dsb gene. E. canes DNA was amplified and sequenced in 28 (40.0%) dogs. Dogs younger than 12 months old showed significantly higher infection rates (65.0%; P < 0.05). Diarrhea, apathy, and anorexia were the major clinical signs observed in 55.2% (P = 0.05), 47.0% (P > 0.05), and 42.4% (P > 0.05) of the PCR-positive dogs, respectively. Twenty-five anemic (<5.5 x 10(6) RBC.mu L(-1)), and 8 leukopenic (<5.5 x 10(3) WBC.mu L(-1)) dogs were PCR-positive (P > 0.05). All 28 PCR-positive dogs showed thrombocytopenia (<175 x 10(3) platelets.mu L(-1)) and revealed statistical significance (P < 0.05). E. canis was the only Ehrlichia species found in dogs in the studied region, with higher infection rates in younger dogs, and statistically associated with thrombocytopenia.

An essential need: creating opportunities for veterinary students and graduates to gain an appreciation of responsibilities and opportunities in global veterinary issues

Malone, J. B.; Bavia, M. E.; Stromberg, B. E.; Valadao, C.; Wiles, W. T.; Diaz, J. H.; Bergquist, R.
Fonte: Office Int Epizooties Publicador: Office Int Epizooties
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: 681-688
ENG
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Globalisation trends and biorterrorism issues have led to new concerns relating to public health, animal health, international trade and food security. There is an imperative to internationalise and strengthen global public health capacity by renewed emphasis on veterinary public health in veterinary education and increasing opportunities for elective experiential learning in public practice programmes for veterinary students. Recent experience with a US-Brazil Higher Education Consortia Program is used as an example of potential ways in which veterinary students can gain an appreciation for global veterinary issues.

Experiences in Teaching Veterinary Public Health across Latin-America and Europe: the SAPUVETNET III Project

De Meneghi, Daniele; Cediel, Natalia; Vilhena, Manuela; Padre, Ludovina; Arroube, Sofia; Baltasar, Patricia; Villamil, Luis Carlos; Romero, Jaime; Sommerfelt, Irma; Keessen, Linny; Van Knapen, Frans; Rosenfeld, Carla; Leguia, Guillermo; Falcon, Nestor; To
Fonte: European College of Veterinary Public Health Publicador: European College of Veterinary Public Health
Tipo: Aula
POR
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46.61%
Experiences in Teaching Veterinary Public Health across Latin-America and Europe: the SAPUVETNET III Project SAPUVETNET III (n. DCI-LA/2008/75) is the third phase of a series of projects, co-financed under the EU ALFA programme, aimed to support a VPH network constituted by Faculties of Veterinary Medicine of 12 Latin-american and 6 European countries in addition to various collaborating institutions/organizations both at national and international level (http://www.sapuvetnet.org). The project envisages the development and the implementation of a common VPH curriculum, through the use of innovative teaching methods, mainly based on problem solving approach. The authors present here some teaching material developed by the project as an example of new strategies/approach for teaching VPH: case studies, videos and self-learning programme on meat inspection/food hygiene, an Interactive Manual on VPH, as well as e-conferences on upcoming VPH issues. Project partners use a mail-list and distance learning platforms (e.g. Moodle, Colibri) to organize teaching activities. A Journal, “Una Salud/One Health/Uma Saúde”, is also published and distributed both as hard copy or .pdf through the web. Didactic tools produced by the SAPUVETNET projects have been and/or are being tested and used by the partner faculties and other teaching institutions...

New Approaches for Education and Training in Veterinary Public Health: The SAPUVET Projects

Ortega, Carmelo; Parilla, Guillermo; De Balogh, Katinka; Rosa, Mauro De; Gimeno, Olga; Estol, Leopoldo; Dobosh, Dora; Leguia, Guillermo; Falcon, Nestor; Fonseca, Adolfo; Torres, Miguel; Caballero, Magaly; Quiros, Jorge; Vilhena, Manuela Clemente; Villamil
Fonte: J Vet Med Educ Publicador: J Vet Med Educ
Tipo: Trabalho de Conclusão de Curso
POR
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36.71%
Continued contact between humans and animals, in combination with the ever-increasing movement of human and animal populations that is one effect of globalization, contributes to the spread of diseases, often with detrimental effects on public health. This has led professionals involved in both animal health and public health to recognize veterinary public health (VPH) as a key area for their activities to address the human–animal interface. Veterinarians, a profession with major involvement in this field, are in need of specific knowledge and skills to prevent and control public-health problems. As a result, VPH must be directly integrated into veterinary educational programs. At present, only few veterinary schools have specific VPH programs; in most institutions, VPH does not feature as a specific subject in either undergraduate or post-graduate curricula. SAPUVET and SAPUVETNET II are network projects supported by the ALFA program of the European Union (EU). Their main objectives are to reach a common understanding between European and Latin American universities in the definition of the areas in which VPH is important in their respective countries, and to design a harmonized training program for veterinarians in VPH, by making use of new technological applications and innovative teaching methodologies. The elaboration of educational material in combination with case studies presenting real-life problems provides a basis to apply the knowledge acquired on VPH. It is envisaged that the material and modules developed during the two projects will be integrated into the veterinary curricula of the participating universities...

Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in a Veterinary Teaching Hospital▿

Sasaki, Takashi; Kikuchi, Ken; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Namiko; Kamata, Shinichi; Hiramatsu, Keiichi
Fonte: American Society for Microbiology Publicador: American Society for Microbiology
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
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We surveyed methicillin-resistant coagulase-positive staphylococcus (MRCPS) strains from 57 (26 inpatient and 31 outpatient) dogs and 20 veterinary staff in a veterinary teaching hospital. From the staff, three MRCPS strains were isolated, and two were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). In contrast, 18 MRCPS strains were detected in both inpatient (12 of 26 [46.2%]) and outpatient (6 of 31 [19.4%]) dogs. Among them, only one strain was MRSA. Using direct sequencing of sodA and hsp60 genes, the 18 MRCPS strains other than MRSA from a staff and 17 dogs, were finally identified as Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, a novel species of Staphylococcus from a cat. All of the methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP) strains were multidrug resistant to erythromycin, clindamycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and levofloxacin. Most of the MRSP strains showed high-level resistance to oxacillin (≥128 μg/ml, 15 of 18 [83.3%]), and 10 of 15 (66.7%) high-level oxacillin-resistant MRSP strains carried type III SCCmec. DNA fingerprinting of MRSP strains by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis yielded eight clusters: clone A with four subtypes, clone B with four subtypes, clone C with three subtypes, and five other different single clones. MRSP strains from the staff and some inpatient and outpatient dogs shared three major clones (clones A...

Demographics and career path choices of graduates from three Canadian veterinary colleges

Jelinski, Murray D.; Campbell, John R.; Lissemore, Kerry; Miller, Lisa M.
Fonte: Canadian Veterinary Medical Association Publicador: Canadian Veterinary Medical Association
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /10/2008 EN
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The classes of 2007 from the Atlantic Veterinary College, Ontario Veterinary College, and Western College of Veterinary Medicine were surveyed to determine what factors influenced the respondents’ career path choices. Seventy percent (166/237) of those contacted participated in the survey of which 89.1% were female, 62.7% had an urban upbringing, and 33.0% expected to be employed in a small center (population ≤ 10 000). Half (52.5%) of the respondents reported that they were interested in mixed or food animal practice at the time of entry into veterinary college, but this proportion declined to 34.2% by the time of graduation. Three factors were significantly associated with choosing a career in mixed or food animal practice: having been raised in a small center, being a male, and having a good to excellent knowledge of food animal production at the time of entry into veterinary college, as determined by a self-assessment.

Escherichia coli and selected veterinary and zoonotic pathogens isolated from environmental sites in companion animal veterinary hospitals in southern Ontario

Murphy, Colleen P.; Reid-Smith, Richard J.; Boerlin, Patrick; Weese, J. Scott; Prescott, John F.; Janecko, Nicol; Hassard, Lori; McEwen, Scott A.
Fonte: Canadian Veterinary Medical Association Publicador: Canadian Veterinary Medical Association
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /09/2010 EN
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Hospital-based infection control in veterinary medicine is emerging and the role of the environment in hospital-acquired infections (HAI) in veterinary hospitals is largely unknown. This study was initiated to determine the recovery of Escherichia coli and selected veterinary and zoonotic pathogens from the environments of 101 community veterinary hospitals. The proportion of hospitals with positive environmental swabs were: E. coli — 92%, Clostridium difficile — 58%, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) — 9%, CMY-2 producing E. coli — 9%, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius — 7%, and Salmonella — 2%. Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp., canine parvovirus, and feline calicivirus were not isolated. Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in E. coli isolates was low. Important potential veterinary and human pathogens were recovered including Canadian epidemic strains MRSA-2 and MRSA-5, and C. difficile ribotype 027. There is an environmental reservoir of pathogens in veterinary hospitals; therefore, additional studies are required to characterize risk factors associated with HAI in companion animals, including the role of the environment.

Epidemiological Analysis of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Carriage among Veterinary Staff of Companion Animals in Japan

ISHIHARA, Kanako; SAITO, Mieko; SHIMOKUBO, Natsumi; MURAMATSU, Yasukazu; MAETANI, Shigeki; TAMURA, Yutaka
Fonte: The Japanese Society of Veterinary Science Publicador: The Japanese Society of Veterinary Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
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36.74%
Veterinary staff carrying methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA) can be a source of MRSA infection in animals. To identify risk factors of MRSA carriage among veterinary staff, MRSA carriage and epidemiological information (sex, career, contact with MRSA-identified animal patients and others) were analyzed from 96 veterinarians and 70 veterinary technicians working at 71 private veterinary clinics in Japan. Univariate analysis determined sex (percentage of MRSA carriage, male (29.2%) vs. female (10%); P=0.002) and career (veterinarians (22.9%) vs. veterinary technicians (10%); P=0.030) as risk factors. Multivariable analysis revealed that sex was independently associated with MRSA carriage (adjusted odds ratio, 3.717; 95% confidence interval, 1.555–8.889; P=0.003). Therefore, male veterinary staff had a higher risk of MRSA carriage than female staff.

Occupational stress in veterinary nurses: roles of the work environment and own companion animal

Black, A.; Winefield, H.; Chur-Hansen, A.
Fonte: Berg Publicador: Berg
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2011 EN
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Veterinary nursing has been identified as an occupation at risk for occupational stress and burnout, but a better understanding of job stressors and influencing factors is needed. The aim of this study was to examine occupational stress in a veterinary nursing population based on established work stress theories. This study sought to determine which environmental aspects of the work situation may be detrimental to well-being and which factors may operate to reduce job stress. A sample of South Australian veterinary nurses (n =127) completed a postal questionnaire about their work environment (job demands and control, work social supports) and their psychological distress, work burnout, and job satisfaction, with a response rate of 76.5%. The potential influence of attachment to participants’ own companion animals was investigated using the Owner Pet Relationship Scale. Hierarchical regressions then explored the contribution to psychological outcomes, of social support at work and attachment to own companion animal, after controlling for work load, exposure to euthanasia, contact with clients, work demands, and work control. While social support at work ameliorated occupational stress, attachment to companion animal was linked to decreased job satisfaction. Supportive interpersonal relations in the workplace have a key role in veterinary nurses’ job satisfaction. Management skill training may have a role in the development of more satisfying workplaces for the veterinary nursing sector...

A qualitative study to explore communication skills in veterinary medical education

Hamood, W.J.; Chur-Hansen, A.; McArthur, M.L.
Fonte: IJME Publicador: IJME
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2014 EN
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OBJECTIVE: To explore and gain an understanding of what "clinical communication skills" mean to veterinarians working in private practice and what implications this might have for veterinary medical education. METHODS: Qualitative research methods were used to purposefully sample a range of veterinary practitioners from a pool of South Australian veterinary practices who were interviewed to determine their understanding of what communication skills mean in the context of veterinary practice. Interviews were conducted with fourteen veterinary practitioners. Participants were sampled from a range of ages, veterinary schools of graduation plus urban and rural locations. Interview transcripts were analysed for themes, definitions and contexts. RESULTS: Participants' accounts included a number of skills which they considered to be "communication". Some of the definitions of these skills parallel communication skills and competencies for human medicine on which communication skills training incorporated into veterinary curricula to date have largely been based. However, the veterinarians in this study also raised interesting contextual differences unique to the veterinary profession, such as communication with the animal, selling service...

An exploratory study of veterinary physiotherapist’s within Ireland

O'Sullivan, Stephanie
Fonte: Department of Physiotherapy, University of Limerick Publicador: Department of Physiotherapy, University of Limerick
Tipo: Bachelor thesis; all_ul_research; ul_theses_dissertations; none
ENG
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36.74%
non-peer-reviewed; Background: Recently, there is a growing interest in the role of veterinary physiotherapy; however the concept of this speciality is still in its infancy in Ireland (Doyle and Horgan 2006). The apparent paucity of evidence within this unique profession warrants further investigation. Objectives: To explore factors influencing both the transitions from human to veterinary physiotherapy and the use of evidence based Practice (EBP); among the clinical interest group, within the ISCP, Chartered Physiotherapist in Veterinary Practice (CPVP). Methods: A multidimensional questionnaire was developed using SurveyMonkey®™ and sent to the members of the CPVP group via email, ensuring anonymity and confidentiality. It was piloted and modified to ensure clarity prior to distribution. A reminder email was sent to maximise responses. Descriptive, frequency and thematic content analysis was carried out to ensure accurate interpretation of the data. Results: A 50% (n=10) response rate was obtained. A variety of positive and negative influencing factors were identified. Common to both objectives, barriers such as use of human based research and facilitators such as animal experience were highlighted. Musculoskeletal experience was deemed significant for both transitioning and use of EBP...

Veterinary Pharmacovigilance and the Human Health: a review of selected adverse drug reaction reporting programs to veterinary drugs; FARMACOVIGILÂNCIA VETERINÁRIA E A SAÚDE HUMANA: UMA REVISÃO DOS PROGRAMAS SELECIONADOS DE NOTIFICAÇÃO DE EVENTOS ADVERSOS A MEDICAMENTOS VETERINÁRIOS

Fusco, Maria Alice; UFRJ; Oliveira, Catia Verônica dos Santos; Densp/Ensp/Fiocruz; Pepe, Vera Lucia Edais; Densp/Ensp/Fiocruz
Fonte: UFPR Publicador: UFPR
Tipo: info:eu-repo/semantics/article; info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion; Artigo Avaliado pelos Pares Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 08/10/2010 POR
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Drug safety profile is an important theme throughout the world. Recently, it has gained importance in the field of veterinary medicines. In Brazil, Ministry of Agriculture Portaria SDA 152/2008 submits to the public consultation the draft of a National Program of Veterinary Pharmacovigilance. Taking into consideration the health risk to exposed human beings, the objectives of this paper are: characterization of veterinary pharmacovigilance and its usefulness for the Public Health, the description of established veterinary pharmacovigilance programs from the United States of America, the European Union and the United Kingdom, and the analysis of the Brazilian Program of veterinary pharmacovigilance draft.; O perfil de segurança dos medicamentos é tema de importância mundial, e objeto que recentemente ganha relevância quanto aos medicamentos veterinários. No Brasil, a Portaria SDA nº 152/2008 do Ministério da Agricultura submeteu à consulta pública o Programa Nacional de Farmacovigilância Veterinária. Considerando o risco que a exposição aos produtos veterinários representa à saúde humana, são objetivos deste trabalho: a caracterização da Farmacovigilância Veterinária e sua utilidade para a Saúde Pública...

Veterinary education in Africa: Current and future perspectives

Swan,G.E.; Kriek,N.P.J.
Fonte: Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research Publicador: Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/01/2009 EN
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Veterinary education commenced in South Africa in 1920 at the Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute in South Africa in association with the Transvaal University College, now the University of Pretoria. Sir Arnold Theiler, Director of Veterinary Research and Education, was the first Dean. Today there are 46 veterinary training institutions in Africa of which 21 are in sub-Saharan Africa. Veterinary services are indispensable to the sustained health and wellbeing of animals and humans, and agricultural economies of countries worldwide. Veterinary education, postgraduate training, and research, and adequate numbers of veterinarians, are essential to satisfy the millennium development goals, the objectives of NEPAD and the African Union, and the agreements regulating international trade. The relevance of the veterinary profession internationally is currently subject to profound scrutiny. Its contributions are assessed against major environmental, demographic, political, disease, technological and economic needs. The scope of veterinary training in future will have to emphasise veterinary public health, food safety, emerging diseases, international trade, bioterrorism, and biomedical research, within the context of a one-health system focusing on the interface between wildlife...

Veterinary extension on sampling techniques related to heartwater research

Steyn,H C; McCrindle,C M E; Du Toit,D
Fonte: Journal of the South African Veterinary Association Publicador: Journal of the South African Veterinary Association
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/09/2010 EN
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Heartwater, a tick-borne disease caused by Ehrlichia ruminantium, is considered to be a significant cause of mortality amongst domestic and wild ruminants in South Africa. The main vector is Amblyomma hebraeum and although previous epidemiological studies have outlined endemic areas based on mortalities, these have been limited by diagnostic methods which relied mainly on positive brain smears. The indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFA) has a low specificity for heartwater organisms as it cross-reacts with some other species. Since the advent of biotechnology and genomics, molecular epidemiology has evolved using the methodology of traditional epidemiology coupled with the new molecular techniques. A new quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) test has been developed for rapid and accurate diagnosis of heartwater in the live animal. This method can also be used to survey populations of A. hebraeum ticks for heartwater. Sampling whole blood and ticks for this qPCR differs from routine serum sampling, which is used for many serological tests. Veterinary field staff, particularly animal health technicians, are involved in surveillance and monitoring of controlled and other diseases of animals in South Africa. However...

A brief overview of the history of veterinary field services in South Africa

Brückner,Gideon K.
Fonte: Journal of the South African Veterinary Association Publicador: Journal of the South African Veterinary Association
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/01/2014 EN
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The historical evolution of veterinary services in South Africa is closely linked to the colonial history of the past and the eventual political formation of the Union of South Africa in 1910, as well as the establishment of a fully democratic South Africa in 1994. The majority of the early pioneering veterinarians had close links to military activities and were originally mostly of British origin. The appointment of the first colonial chief veterinary officers occurred in the late 1800s. These appointments were dictated by the need to combat devastating animal diseases, such as rinderpest and African horse sickness, mainly because they affected draught oxen (used for travel) and horses (used in combat). Veterinary field services was established in 1962 as a separate functional entity within government services when M.C. Lambrechts became Director of Veterinary Services of South Africa. In the context of this article, veterinary field services refers to that sphere of veterinary service delivery conducted by government-appointed or seconded veterinarians applying disease control and prevention, as required by animal health legislation. Paging through the history of veterinary field services in South Africa confirms that the problems faced by the veterinary services of today were just as real during the times of our pioneers. The pioneers of veterinary services transformed unknown animal diseases into textbook descriptions still used today and also demonstrated the important link to...

Veterinary nursing in South Africa (1977-2000)

Wolleschak,I
Fonte: Journal of the South African Veterinary Association Publicador: Journal of the South African Veterinary Association
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/01/2010 EN
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46.54%
The history of the university course in veterinary nursing in South Africa is reviewed from its inception in 1977 to 2000. The motivation for, and initial problems encountered in, its implementation are outlined. Selection criteria and course subjects, including clinical work, are supplied and the changes in these, following the introduction of a new curriculum in 1993/94, arehighlighted. Reference is made to the legal status of the nursing profession.

The role of the Jotello F. Soga Library in the digital preservation of South African veterinary history

Breytenbach,Amelia; Lourens,Antoinette; Marsh,Susan
Fonte: Journal of the South African Veterinary Association Publicador: Journal of the South African Veterinary Association
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/01/2013 EN
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The history of veterinary science in South Africa can only be appreciated, studied, researched and passed on to coming generations if historical sources are readily available. In most countries, material and sources with historical value are often difficult to locate, dispersed over a large area and not part of the conventional book and journal literature. The Faculty of Veterinary Science of the University of Pretoria and its library has access to a large collection of historical sources. The collection consists of photographs, photographic slides, documents, proceedings, posters, audio-visual material, postcards and other memorabilia. Other institutions in the country are also approached if relevant sources are identified in their collections. The University of Pretoria's institutional repository, UPSpace, was launched in 2006. This provided the Jotello F. Soga Library with the opportunity to fill the repository with relevant digitised collections of diverse heritage and learning resources that can contribute to the long-term preservation and accessibility of historical veterinary sources. These collections are available for use not only by historians and researchers in South Africa but also elsewhere in Africa and the rest of the world. Important historical collections such as the Arnold Theiler collection...

Origin and history to date of the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP) African Foundation

Krecek,R C; Penzhorn,B L; de Waal,D T; Peter,R J; Prichard,R; Sumption,D
Fonte: Journal of the South African Veterinary Association Publicador: Journal of the South African Veterinary Association
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/01/2011 EN
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The origin of the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP) African Foundation is described. The 16th WAAVP Conference held in South Africa in 1997 generated a surplus of ZAR 430 460 (US$ 70 116). This was invested and a foundation established to manage the fund with the intention of using it to the mutual advantage of the WAAVP and African veterinary parasitologists. To date, more than 110 scholarship applications have been screened, and 51 full and partial scholarships awarded to young African veterinary parasitologists to attend subsequent biennial WAAVP Conferences. This investment has grown into a very successful endowment currently valued at US$ 206 553. This article is written in response to many queries across the globe about the origin of this fund and how it has been invested, managed, sustained and utilised.

Veterinary education in South Africa: The Classes of 1934 & 1935

Bigalke,R D
Fonte: Journal of the South African Veterinary Association Publicador: Journal of the South African Veterinary Association
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/01/2008 EN
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The Class of 1934 included 2 graduates who created milestones for the veterinary profession in South Africa. Jack Boswell was the first Onderstepoort graduate to start his own private practice without ever joining the government service. George van der Wath has the distinction of being the only South African veterinarian to become Chairman of the prestigious South African Wool Board. Ashton Tarr was President of the South African Veterinary Medical Association from 1966-1969. Concise descriptions are given of the varied life histories of the 14 members of the Classes of 1934 and 1935. All except Boswell initially joined government service, one serving mainly in the Colonial Service before eventually returning to South Africa. Three spent their entire careers in the South African Veterinary (Field) Services, finally occupying very senior positions in that division. One ended his career lecturing at a university. Lambrechts was the first veterinarian to occupy the 'resurrected' post of Director of Veterinary Services reserved for field veterinarians. Only one of the graduates opted for research, but went farming after obtaining a DVSc degree. Three spent the greater part of their careers in private practice, Thiel from as early as 1937. Two went into municipal (public health) service...

The history of veterinary medicine in Namibia

Schneider,Herbert P.
Fonte: Journal of the South African Veterinary Association Publicador: Journal of the South African Veterinary Association
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/01/2012 EN
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Until the middle of the 19th century, very few references exist regarding the occurrence of animal diseases in Namibia. With the introduction of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) in 1859, this picture changed completely and livestock owners implemented various forms of disease control in an effort to contain the spread of this disease and minimise its devastating effects. After the establishment of the colonial administration in 1884, the first animal disease legislation was introduced in 1887 and the first veterinarian, Dr Wilhelm Rickmann, arrived in 1894. CBPP and the outbreak of rinderpest in 1897 necessitated a greatly expanded veterinary infrastructure and the first veterinary laboratory was erected at Gammams near Windhoek in 1897. To prevent the spread of rinderpest, a veterinary cordon line was established, which was the very beginning of the Veterinary Cordon Fence as it is known today. After the First World War, a small but dedicated corps of veterinarians again built up an efficient animal health service in the following decades, with veterinary private practice developing from the mid-1950s. The veterinary profession organised itself in 1947 in the form of a veterinary association and, in 1984, legislation was passed to regulate the veterinary profession by the establishment of the Veterinary Council of Namibia. The outbreak of foot and mouth disease in 1961 was instrumental in the creation of an effective veterinary service...