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Human cutaneous C fibres activated by cooling, heating and menthol

Campero, M; Baumann, T K; Bostock, H; Ochoa, J L
Fonte: Blackwell Science Inc Publicador: Blackwell Science Inc
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.08%
Differential A-fibre block of human peripheral nerves changes the sensation evoked by innocuous cooling (∼24°C) of the skin from ‘cold’ to ‘hot’ or ‘burning’, and this has been attributed to activity in unidentified unmyelinated fibres that is normally masked or inhibited by activity in Aδ cold fibres. Application of the TRPM8 agonist menthol to the skin evokes ‘burning/stinging’ as well as ‘cold’, and the unpleasant sensations are also enhanced by A-fibre block. In this study we used microneurography to search for C fibres in human skin activated by cooling and menthol, which could be responsible for these phenomena. Afferent C fibres were classified by activity-dependent slowing as Type 1A (polymodal nociceptor), Type 1B (mechanically insensitive nociceptor) or Type 2 (cold sensitive), and their responses to heating and cooling ramps were measured before and after topical application of menthol preparations (2–50%). The only C fibres activated by menthol were the Type 2 fibres, which discharged vigorously with innocuous cooling and were strongly activated and sensitized to cooling by menthol. Unlike an Aδ cold fibre, they continued to discharge at skin temperatures down to 0°C, and most (13/15) were also activated by heating. We propose that the Type 2 C fibres...

Perception of Thermal Pain and the Thermal Grill Illusion Is Associated with Polymorphisms in the Serotonin Transporter Gene

Lindstedt, Fredrik; Lonsdorf, Tina B.; Schalling, Martin; Kosek, Eva; Ingvar, Martin
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 15/03/2011 EN
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36.17%

Evidence for Thalamic Involvement in the Thermal Grill Illusion: An fMRI Study

Lindstedt, Fredrik; Johansson, Bo; Martinsen, Sofia; Kosek, Eva; Fransson, Peter; Ingvar, Martin
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 11/11/2011 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.08%

Supraspinal characterization of the thermal grill illusion with fMRI

Leung, Albert; Shukla, Shivshil; Li, Eric; Duann, Jeng-Ren; Yaksh, Tony
Fonte: BioMed Central Publicador: BioMed Central
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 11/03/2014 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.08%

Rumination and interoceptive accuracy predict the occurrence of the thermal grill illusion of pain

Scheuren, Raymonde; Sütterlin, Stefan; Anton, Fernand
Fonte: BioMed Central Publicador: BioMed Central
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 18/07/2014 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.08%

Reduced response to the thermal grill illusion in chronic pain patients

Sumracki, N.; Buisman-Pijlman, F.; Hutchinson, M.; Gentgall, M.; Rolan, P.
Fonte: Wiley Publicador: Wiley
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2014 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
97.12%
OBJECTIVE Sensory illusions may reveal fundamental features of the nervous system. The thermal grill illusion is such a pain illusion, where interlaced warm and cool temperature bars (thermal grill) produce a paradoxical burning sensation. Previous studies have only systematically investigated the thermal grill illusion in pain-free volunteers. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the response to the thermal grill illusion was tolerable in patients with chronic pain and whether the response differed between patients with chronic pain and pain-free volunteers. SUBJECTS Sixteen pain-free participants and 18 chronic pain patients (seven not receiving opioids and 11 receiving opioids). METHODS The thermal grill response was investigated using a custom-built thermal grill. Heat and cold pain thresholds were also determined. RESULTS Chronic pain patients reported less intense pain, heat, and unpleasantness to the thermal grill compared with pain-free participants; in particular, there was an overall main effect for significantly less heat from the thermal grill compared with pain-free participants (P = 0.016). At the 22/38°C combination, although the majority of pain-free participants experienced the illusion to some degree...

The thermal grill as a tool to investigate analgesic clinical pharmacology.

Sumracki, Nicole Martha
Fonte: Universidade de Adelaide Publicador: Universidade de Adelaide
Tipo: Tese de Doutorado
Publicado em //2015
Relevância na Pesquisa
87.2%
Human experimental pain models are important aids in the study of pain mechanisms, and have been extensively used in clinical drug development to demonstrate the analgesic potential of new compounds. However, the peripheral nature of such pain models makes it difficult to separate the peripheral and central mechanisms of pain. Whilst peripheral mechanisms underlie acute pain, central mechanisms are believed to underlie chronic pain conditions; therefore using an illusion to trick the brain into believing it is experiencing pain may allow investigation of these central mechanisms. One such illusion is the thermal grill illusion, where interlaced innocuous warm and cool temperature bars (thermal grill) produce a paradoxical burning pain sensation. Considering the uniqueness of the thermal grill illusion and the thermal grills’ potential ability to investigate the interaction between the nociceptive and thermoreceptive pathways, the objective of this thesis was to investigate whether the response to the thermal grill was tolerable in patients with chronic pain to determine whether the thermal grill illusion could be used to screen for novel centrally acting analgesics in the future. Previously the response to the thermal grill had not been systematically investigated in patients with chronic pain. In order to address this objective...