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Nestmate recognition in a stingless bee: does the similarity of chemical cues determine guard acceptance?

NUNES, Tulio M.; NASCIMENTO, Fabio S.; TURATTI, Izabel C.; LOPES, Norberto P.; ZUCCHI, Ronaldo
Fonte: ACADEMIC PRESS LTD ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD Publicador: ACADEMIC PRESS LTD ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
ENG
Relevância na Pesquisa
45.99%
The ability to discriminate nestmates from non-nestmates is critical to the maintenance of the integrity of social insect colonies. Guard workers compare the chemical cues of an incoming individual with their internal template to determine whether the entrant belongs to their colony. In contrast to honeybees, Apis mellifera, stingless bees have singly mated queens and, therefore, are expected to have a higher chemical homogeneity in their colonies. We tested whether aggressive behaviour of Frieseomelitta varia guards towards nestmate and non-nestmate foragers reflects chemical similarities and dissimilarities, respectively, of cuticular hydrocarbon profiles. We also introduced individuals of Lestrimelitta limao, an obligatory robber species, to test the ability of guards to react effectively to intruders from other taxa. We verified that foraging nestmates were almost invariably accepted, while heterospecific and conspecific non-nestmates were rejected at relatively high rates. However, non-nestmate individuals with higher chemical profile similarity were likely to be accepted by guards. We conclude that guards compare the chemical cuticular blend of incoming individuals and make acceptance decisions according to the similarity of the compounds between the colonies. (c) 2007 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Viabilidade econômica da TIE (Técnica do Inseto Estéril) no controle epidemiológico do mosquito Aedes aegypti; Economic viability of TIE (Sterile Insect Technique) in epidemiological control of mosquito Aedes aegypti

Souza, Lívia Rodrigues Spaggiari
Fonte: Biblioteca Digitais de Teses e Dissertações da USP Publicador: Biblioteca Digitais de Teses e Dissertações da USP
Tipo: Dissertação de Mestrado Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 06/02/2015 PT
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.15%
A dengue é atualmente uma das doenças tropicais com maior rapidez de propagação e de grande alcance mundial (OMS, 2013). No Brasil, o governo federal, bem como os estados e os municípios gastam montantes significativos em sua prevenção e controle. O presente trabalho analisa aspectos econômicos e sociais da implementação de uma nova técnica de combate ao mosquito Aedes aegypti, a TIE, vis-à-vis os métodos convencionais. Essa técnica é avaliada com base no estudo de caso da Biofábrica Moscamed, responsável pelo desenvolvimento da mesma no Brasil. A TIE consiste na esterilização dos insetos e posterior soltura no ambiente, com a finalidade de diminuir a população de insetos selvagens, estes vetores do vírus da dengue. Dois cenários são analisados: cenário atual de medidas de prevenção e controle adotadas pelas prefeituras e o cenário de adoção da TIE, em substituição aos métodos atuais. São tomados como estudos de caso a aplicação da TIE em Jacobina e Juazeiro, na Bahia, cujos dados foram extrapolados para uma simulação também para o município de Piracicaba, em São Paulo. Calcula-se o VPL para o cenário da TIE, considerando um horizonte temporal de quatro anos e a discussão é conduzida no escopo simplificado de uma Análise de Impacto Regulatório (AIR). Foram analisados ainda os gastos das prefeituras para o controle da dengue e de seu vetor...

A survey of DNA methylation across social insect species, life stages, and castes reveals abundant and caste-associated methylation in a primitively social wasp

Weiner, Susan A.; Galbraith, David A.; Adams, Dean C.; Valenzuela, Nicole; Noll, Fernando B.; Grozinger, Christina M.; Toth, Amy L.
Fonte: Universidade Estadual Paulista Publicador: Universidade Estadual Paulista
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: 795-799
ENG
Relevância na Pesquisa
56.05%
DNA methylation plays an important role in the epigenetic control of developmental and behavioral plasticity, with connections to the generation of striking phenotypic differences between castes (larger, reproductive queens and smaller, non-reproductive workers) in honeybees and ants. Here, we provide the first comparative investigation of caste- and life stage-associated DNA methylation in several species of bees and vespid wasps displaying different levels of social organization. Our results reveal moderate levels of DNA methylation in most bees and wasps, with no clear relationship to the level of sociality. Strikingly, primitively social Polistes dominula paper wasps show unusually high overall DNA methylation and caste-related differences in site-specific methylation. These results suggest DNA methylation may play a role in the regulation of behavioral and physiological differences in primitively social species with more flexible caste differences. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Function and evolution of a gene family encoding odorant binding-like proteins in a social insect, the honey bee (Apis mellifera)

Forêt, Sylvain; Maleszka, Ryszard
Fonte: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press Publicador: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /11/2006 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.03%
The remarkable olfactory power of insect species is thought to be generated by a combinatorial action of two large protein families, G protein-coupled olfactory receptors (ORs) and odorant binding proteins (OBPs). In olfactory sensilla, OBPs deliver hydrophobic airborne molecules to ORs, but their expression in nonolfactory tissues suggests that they also may function as general carriers in other developmental and physiological processes. Here we used bioinformatic and experimental approaches to characterize the OBP-like gene family in a highly social insect, the Western honey bee. Comparison with other insects shows that the honey bee has the smallest set of these genes, consisting of only 21 OBPs. This number stands in stark contrast to the more than 70 OBPs in Anopheles gambiae and 51 in Drosophila melanogaster. In the honey bee as in the two dipterans, these genes are organized in clusters. We show that the evolution of their structure involved frequent intron losses. We describe a monophyletic subfamily of OBPs where the diversification of some amino acids appears to have been accelerated by positive selection. Expression profiling under a wide range of conditions shows that in the honey bee only nine OBPs are antenna-specific. The remaining genes are expressed either ubiquitously or are tightly regulated in specialized tissues or during development. These findings support the view that OBPs are not restricted to olfaction and are likely to be involved in broader physiological functions.

The making of a social insect: developmental architectures of social design

Page, Robert E.; Amdam, Gro V.
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /04/2007 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.15%
We marvel at the social complexity of insects, marked by anatomically and behaviorally distinguishable castes, division of labor and specialization—but how do such systems evolve? Insect societies are composed of individuals, each undergoing its own developmental process and each containing its own genetic information and experiencing its own developmental and experiential environment. Yet societies appear to function as if the colonies themselves are individuals with novel “social genes” and novel social developmental processes. We propose an alternative hypothesis. The origins of complex social behavior, from which insect societies emerge, are derived from ancestral developmental programs. These programs originated in ancient solitary insects and required little evolutionary remodeling. We present evidence from behavioral assays, selective breeding, genetic mapping, functional genomics and endocrinology, and comparative anatomy and physiology. These insights explain how complex social behavior can evolve from heterochronic changes in reproductive signaling systems that govern ubiquitous and ancient relationships between behavior and ovarian development.

The Development and Evolution of Division of Labor and Foraging Specialization in a Social Insect (Apis mellifera L.)

Page, Robert E.; Scheiner, Ricarda; Erber, Joachim; Amdam, Gro V.
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2006 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.11%
How does complex social behavior evolve? What are the developmental building blocks of division of labor and specialization, the hallmarks of insect societies? Studies have revealed the developmental origins in the evolution of division of labor and specialization in foraging worker honeybees, the hallmarks of complex insect societies. Selective breeding for a single social trait, the amount of surplus pollen stored in the nest (pollen hoarding) revealed a phenotypic architecture of correlated traits at multiple levels of biological organization in facultatively sterile female worker honeybees. Verification of this phenotypic architecture in “wild-type” bees provided strong support for a “pollen foraging syndrome” that involves increased senso-motor responses, motor activity, associative learning, reproductive status, and rates of behavioral development, as well as foraging behavior. This set of traits guided further research into reproductive regulatory systems that were co-opted by natural selection during the evolution of social behavior. Division of labor, characterized by changes in the tasks performed by bees, as they age, is controlled by hormones linked to ovary development. Foraging specialization on nectar and pollen results also from different reproductive states of bees where nectar foragers engage in prereproductive behavior...

On optimal decision-making in brains and social insect colonies

Marshall, James A. R.; Bogacz, Rafal; Dornhaus, Anna; Planqué, Robert; Kovacs, Tim; Franks, Nigel R.
Fonte: The Royal Society Publicador: The Royal Society
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.18%
The problem of how to compromise between speed and accuracy in decision-making faces organisms at many levels of biological complexity. Striking parallels are evident between decision-making in primate brains and collective decision-making in social insect colonies: in both systems, separate populations accumulate evidence for alternative choices; when one population reaches a threshold, a decision is made for the corresponding alternative, and this threshold may be varied to compromise between the speed and the accuracy of decision-making. In primate decision-making, simple models of these processes have been shown, under certain parametrizations, to implement the statistically optimal procedure that minimizes decision time for any given error rate. In this paper, we adapt these same analysis techniques and apply them to new models of collective decision-making in social insect colonies. We show that social insect colonies may also be able to achieve statistically optimal collective decision-making in a very similar way to primate brains, via direct competition between evidence-accumulating populations. This optimality result makes testable predictions for how collective decision-making in social insects should be organized. Our approach also represents the first attempt to identify a common theoretical framework for the study of decision-making in diverse biological systems.

Brain transcriptomic analysis in paper wasps identifies genes associated with behaviour across social insect lineages

Toth, Amy L.; Varala, Kranthi; Henshaw, Michael T.; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L.; Hudson, Matthew E.; Robinson, Gene E.
Fonte: The Royal Society Publicador: The Royal Society
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
45.99%
Comparative sociogenomics has the potential to provide important insights into how social behaviour evolved. We examined brain gene expression profiles of the primitively eusocial wasp Polistes metricus and compared the results with a growing base of brain gene expression information for the advanced eusocial honeybee, Apis mellifera. We studied four female wasp groups that show variation in foraging/provisioning behaviour and reproductive status, using our newly developed microarray representing approximately 3248 P. metricus genes based on sequences generated from high-throughput pyrosequencing. We found differences in the expression of approximately 389 genes across the four groups. Pathways known from Drosophila melanogaster to be related to lipid metabolism, heat and stress response, and various forms of solitary behaviour were associated with behavioural differences among wasps. Forty-five per cent of differentially expressed transcripts showed significant associations with foraging/provisioning status, and 14 per cent with reproductive status. By comparing these two gene lists with lists of genes previously shown to be differentially expressed in association with honeybee division of labour, we found a significant overlap of genes associated with foraging/provisioning...

Learning and discrimination of cuticular hydrocarbons in a social insect

van Wilgenburg, Ellen; Felden, Antoine; Choe, Dong-Hwan; Sulc, Robert; Luo, Jun; Shea, Kenneth J.; Elgar, Mark A.; Tsutsui, Neil D.
Fonte: The Royal Society Publicador: The Royal Society
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
45.99%
Social insect cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) mixtures are among the most complex chemical cues known and are important in nest-mate, caste and species recognition. Despite our growing knowledge of the nature of these cues, we have very little insight into how social insects actually perceive and discriminate among these chemicals. In this study, we use the newly developed technique of differential olfactory conditioning to pure, custom-designed synthetic colony odours to analyse signal discrimination in Argentine ants, Linepithema humile. Our results show that tri-methyl alkanes are more easily learned than single-methyl or straight-chain alkanes. In addition, we reveal that Argentine ants can discriminate between hydrocarbons with different branching patterns and the same chain length, but not always between hydrocarbons with the same branching patterns but different chain length. Our data thus show that biochemical characteristics influence those compounds that ants can discriminate between, and which thus potentially play a role in chemical signalling and nest-mate recognition.

Information Processing in Social Insect Networks

Waters, James S.; Fewell, Jennifer H.
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 16/07/2012 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.11%
Investigating local-scale interactions within a network makes it possible to test hypotheses about the mechanisms of global network connectivity and to ask whether there are general rules underlying network function across systems. Here we use motif analysis to determine whether the interactions within social insect colonies resemble the patterns exhibited by other animal associations or if they exhibit characteristics of biological regulatory systems. Colonies exhibit a predominance of feed-forward interaction motifs, in contrast to the densely interconnected clique patterns that characterize human interaction and animal social networks. The regulatory motif signature supports the hypothesis that social insect colonies are shaped by selection for network patterns that integrate colony functionality at the group rather than individual level, and demonstrates the utility of this approach for analysis of selection effects on complex systems across biological levels of organization.

SOCIAL EVOLUTION IN ANTS: DIRECT AND INDIRECT GENETIC EFFECTS

Linksvayer, Timothy A.
Fonte: [Bloomington, Ind.] : Indiana University Publicador: [Bloomington, Ind.] : Indiana University
Tipo: Doctoral Dissertation
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.22%
Thesis (PhD) - Indiana University, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, 2005; When social interactions occur, the phenotype of an individual can be influenced both directly by its own genes and indirectly by genes expressed in social partners. Eusocial insect colonies are notable for extensive behavioral interactions among larval, worker, and queen nestmates. In particular, developing larvae are reliant on care provided by workers and queens. Social insect phenotypes are thus affected by zygotic genes expressed during development (direct genetic effects), genes expressed in care-giving adult workers (sibsocial genetic effects), and genes expressed in queens (maternal genetic effects). The purpose of this dissertation was to incorporate this complexity into models of social insect evolution and to empirically study the evolutionary importance of direct and indirect genetic effects on ant phenotypes. The first chapter reviews existing models for the evolutionary origin and maintenance of eusociality in social insects and proposes a new model incorporating both direct and indirect genetic effects. The second chapter uses a quantitative genetic approach to estimate variation for direct and indirect genetic effects on worker, gyne...

Regulation of oviposition in social hymenoptera

Brian, M.V.; Brian, A.D.
Fonte: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França Publicador: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França
Tipo: Journal Article-postprint
EN; ENGLISH
Relevância na Pesquisa
45.87%
The rate of increase of population in societies of social insects obviously depends upon the numbers of adults which can be produced per head of the adult population. Ideally, the numbers of eggs laid should be just appropriate to this situation, so that the prevailing food supply may be efficiently transformed.

Plasticity of physiological caste in a social insect

Solis, Carlos Rodolfo
Fonte: Universidade Rice Publicador: Universidade Rice
Tipo: Thesis; Text Formato: 185 p.; application/pdf
ENG
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.02%
In social insect colonies workers realize their reproductive potential through rearing the queen's brood. In the primitively eusocial wasp Polistes exclamans (Hymenoptera: Vespidae) castes are not morphologically distinct. This species has an annual colony cycle that begins when mated, hibernated females start colonies in the spring. One foundress becomes the queen while the rest become workers. The worker population grows throughout the year until the appearance of gynes, females that do not work but become foundresses the following spring. Males are also produced by the end of the season, but they die in winter with the workers. While morphological caste differences are absent, caste can be identified using behavioral and physiological parameters. In contrast with other social insects, female caste remains undetermined until adulthood, and even then females switch between castes under the appropriate circumstances. This can be advantageous since high nest predation rates and unpredictable environmental variation, accompanied by frequent queen supersedure are typical. I studied three aspects of the P. exclamans caste system: (i) morphology and physiology in gynes and workers; (ii) seasonal resource allocation into brood and (iii) effects of brood loss on caste determination. Physiological indicators were derived from qualitative and quantitative studies of biochemical components...

The scent language of honey bees; Le langage odorant des abeilles

Ribbands, Ronald
Fonte: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França Publicador: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França
Tipo: Journal Article-postprint
EN; ENGLISH
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.16%
It is a relaxation to turn from the pressing problems of our own community life to study for a while the social life of the honey bee, which is very interesting and quite different from our own. Only a small proportion of the two million different kinds of insects that exist today live in communities, and of these only a few share the honey bee's habit of living in a large and well-organized society. We know more about the mode of life and the behavior of the honey bee than that of any other social insect, because the economic value of its honey and its wax made it worth while for man to domesticate this insect, with the result that its activities have been kept under close observation for many centuries. As in aIl other social insects, the family forms the social unit, and there has been no integration above that level; never does one come across a number of families associating together to form a cornmunity in the way that happens in the case of man. Nevertheless a honey-bee colony can reach a considerable size, and it may come to contain as many as 70,000 worker bees, aIl of them the progeny of one fertile female, their queen. The queen lays aIl the eggs, and the workers carry out aIl the other work of the colony. The efficient functioning of this large family is clearly impossible unless its members are able to communicate with each other effectively...

Interaction of insect actomyosin with adenosine triphosphate; Interaction des insectes actomyosin avec l'adénosine triphosphate

Maruyama, K.
Fonte: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França Publicador: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França
Tipo: Journal Article-postprint
EN; ENGLISH
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.09%
Some physiocochemical observations were made on the interaction between actomyosin from honeybee thoracic muscle and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ATP caused superprecipitation, viscosity drop, and light-scattering drop in insect actomyosin. On the other hand, actomyosin showed a powerful ATP-splitting enzyme action. The extent of these interactions of insect actomyosin with ATP was fairly coniparable with those of rabbit actomyosin. From the viewpoint of comparative biochemistry, these observations, in general, support the current theory that the ATP-actomyosin system is essential for muscular contraction.

Learning, specialization, efficiency and task allocation in social insects

Chittka, Lars; Muller, Helene
Fonte: Landes Bioscience Publicador: Landes Bioscience
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2009 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.16%
One of the most spectacular features of social insect colonies is their division of labor. Although individuals are often totipotent in terms of the labor they might perform, they might persistently work as scouts, fighters, nurses, foragers, undertakers or cleaners with a repetitiveness that might resemble an assembly line worker in a factory. Perhaps because of this apparent analogy, researchers have often assumed a priori that such labor division must be efficient, but empirical proof is scarce. New work on Themnothorax ants shows that there might be no link between an individual's propensity to perform a task, and their efficiency at that task, nor are task specialists more efficient than generalists. Here we argue that learning psychology might provide the missing link between social insect task specialization and efficiency: just like in human societies, efficiency at a job specialty is only partially a result of “talent”, or innate tendency to engage in a job: it is much more a result of perfecting skills with experience, and the extent to which experience can be carried over from one task to the next (transfer), or whether experience at one task might actually impair performance at another (interference). Indeed there is extensive circumstantial evidence that learning is involved in almost any task performed by social insect workers...

Genetic basis for queen–worker dimorphism in a social insect

Volny, Veronica P.; Gordon, Deborah M.
Fonte: The National Academy of Sciences Publicador: The National Academy of Sciences
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
45.94%
Eusocial insects are characterized by reproductive division of labor, cooperative brood care, and the presence of a sterile worker caste. It is generally accepted that caste determination, including the differentiation of females into sterile workers and reproductive queens, is determined by environmental factors. In contrast, we find that in the red harvester ant, Pogonomyrmex barbatus, an individual's genotype at a particular microsatellite locus predicts its caste. We propose that this microsatellite locus is in tight linkage disequilibrium with at least one locus that plays an important role in caste determination. We call this the caste locus. We hypothesize that the system of caste determination we observe segregates the population into two distinct genetic lineages, each of which has distinct alleles at the microsatellite locus and also has distinct alleles, we propose, at caste. Workers are the offspring of parents from different lineages, and are thus heterozygous at caste, whereas queens are the offspring of parents from the same lineage, and are, therefore, homozygous at caste. This mode of caste determination has important consequences for the evolution of multiple mating by females and for control of the sex ratio and reproductive allocation in social insect colonies.

Function and evolution of a gene family encoding odorant binding-like proteins in a social insect, the honey been (Apis melliera)

Foret, Sylvain; Maleszka, Ryszard
Fonte: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press Publicador: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Relevância na Pesquisa
45.94%
The remarkable olfactory power of insect species is thought to be generated by a combinatorial action of two large protein families, G protein-coupled olfactory receptors (ORs) and odorant binding proteins (OBPs). In olfactory sensilla, OBPs deliver hydro

Dynamical models of task organization in social insect colonies

Kang, Yun; Theraulaz, Guy
Fonte: Universidade Cornell Publicador: Universidade Cornell
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 15/11/2015
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.13%
The organizations of insect societies, such as division of labor, task allocation, collective regulation, mass action responses, have been considered as main reasons for the ecological success. In this article, we propose and study a general modeling framework that includes the following three features: (a) the average internal response threshold for each task (the internal factor); (b) social network communications that could lead to task switching (the environmental factor); and (c) dynamical changes of task demands (the external factor). Since workers in many social insect species exhibit \emph{age polyethism}, we also extend our model to incorporate \emph{age polyethism} in which worker task preferences change with age. We apply our general modeling framework to the cases of two task groups: the inside colony task versus the outside colony task. Our analytical study of the models provides important insights and predictions on the effects of colony size, social communication, and age related task preferences on task allocation and division of labor in the adaptive dynamical environment. Our study implies that the smaller size colony invests its resource for the colony growth and allocates more workers in the risky tasks such as foraging while the larger colony shifts more workers to perform the safer tasks inside the colony. Social interactions among different task groups play an important role in shaping task allocation depending on the relative cost and demands of the tasks.

Social insect colony as a biological regulatory system: Information flow in dominance networks

Nandi, Anjan K.; Sumana, Annagiri; Bhattacharya, Kunal
Fonte: Universidade Cornell Publicador: Universidade Cornell
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 16/03/2014
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.04%
Social insects provide an excellent platform to investigate flow of information in regulatory systems since their successful social organization is essentially achieved by effective information transfer through complex connectivity patterns among the colony members. Network representation of such behavioural interactions offers a powerful tool for structural as well as dynamical analysis of the underlying regulatory systems. In this paper, we focus on the dominance interaction networks in the tropical social wasp \textit{Ropalidia marginata} - a species where behavioural observations indicate that such interactions are principally responsible for the transfer of information between individuals about their colony needs, resulting in a regulation of their own activities. Our research reveals that the dominance networks of \textit{R. marginata} are structurally similar to a class of naturally evolved information processing networks, a fact confirmed also by the predominance of a specific substructure - the `feed-forward loop' - a key functional component in many other information transfer networks. The dynamical analysis through Boolean modeling confirms that the networks are sufficiently stable under small fluctuations and yet capable of more efficient information transfer compared to their randomized counterparts. Our results suggest the involvement of a common structural design principle in different biological regulatory systems and a possible similarity with respect to the effect of selection on the organization levels of such systems. The findings are also consistent with the hypothesis that dominance behaviour has been shaped by natural selection to co-opt the information transfer process in such social insect species...