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Learning Cell Biology as a Team: A Project-Based Approach to Upper-Division Cell Biology

Wright, Robin; Boggs, James
Fonte: The American Society for Cell Biology Publicador: The American Society for Cell Biology
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2002 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
65.7%
To help students develop successful strategies for learning how to learn and communicate complex information in cell biology, we developed a quarter-long cell biology class based on team projects. Each team researches a particular human disease and presents information about the cellular structure or process affected by the disease, the cellular and molecular biology of the disease, and recent research focused on understanding the cellular mechanisms of the disease process. To support effective teamwork and to help students develop collaboration skills useful for their future careers, we provide training in working in small groups. A final poster presentation, held in a public forum, summarizes what students have learned throughout the quarter. Although student satisfaction with the course is similar to that of standard lecture-based classes, a project-based class offers unique benefits to both the student and the instructor.

Learning How Scientists Work: Experiential Research Projects to Promote Cell Biology Learning and Scientific Process Skills

DebBurman, Shubhik K.
Fonte: The American Society for Cell Biology Publicador: The American Society for Cell Biology
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2002 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
65.62%
Facilitating not only the mastery of sophisticated subject matter, but also the development of process skills is an ongoing challenge in teaching any introductory undergraduate course. To accomplish this goal in a sophomore-level introductory cell biology course, I require students to work in groups and complete several mock experiential research projects that imitate the professional activities of the scientific community. I designed these projects as a way to promote process skill development within content-rich pedagogy and to connect text-based and laboratory-based learning with the world of contemporary research. First, students become familiar with one primary article from a leading peer-reviewed journal, which they discuss by means of PowerPoint-based journal clubs and journalism reports highlighting public relevance. Second, relying mostly on primary articles, they investigate the molecular basis of a disease, compose reviews for an in-house journal, and present seminars in a public symposium. Last, students author primary articles detailing investigative experiments conducted in the lab. This curriculum has been successful in both quarter-based and semester-based institutions. Student attitudes toward their learning were assessed quantitatively with course surveys. Students consistently reported that these projects significantly lowered barriers to primary literature...

Cancer Cell Biology: A Student-Centered Instructional Module Exploring the Use of Multimedia to Enrich Interactive, Constructivist Learning of Science

Bockholt, Susanne M.; West, J. Paige; Bollenbacher, Walter E.
Fonte: The American Society for Cell Biology Publicador: The American Society for Cell Biology
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2003 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
65.64%
Multimedia has the potential of providing bioscience education novel learning environments and pedagogy applications to foster student interest, involve students in the research process, advance critical thinking/problem-solving skills, and develop conceptual understanding of biological topics. Cancer Cell Biology, an interactive, multimedia, problem-based module, focuses on how mutations in protooncogenes and tumor suppressor genes can lead to uncontrolled cell proliferation by engaging students as research scientists/physicians with the task of diagnosing the molecular basis of tumor growth for a group of patients. The process of constructing the module, which was guided by scientist and student feedback/responses, is described. The completed module and insights gained from its development are presented as a potential “multimedia pedagogy” for the development of other multimedia science learning environments.

The Palade Symposium: Celebrating Cell Biology at Its Best

Schmid, Sandra L.; Farquhar, Marilyn G.
Fonte: The American Society for Cell Biology Publicador: The American Society for Cell Biology
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 15/07/2010 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
65.71%
A symposium was held at the University of California, San Diego, to honor the contributions of Nobel Laureate, George Palade, to cell biology. The speakers included Günter Blobel, on the structure and function of nuclear pore complexes; Peter Walter, on the unfolded protein response in health and disease; Randy Schekman, on human disease-linked mutations in the COPII machinery; Scott Emr, on the regulation of plasma membrane composition by selective endocytosis; Roger Kornberg, on the structure and function of the transcription machinery; Peter Novick, on the regulation of rab GTPases along the secretory pathway; Jim Spudich, on the mechanism of the enigmatic myosin VI motor; and Joe Goldstein, on the function of the Niemann-Pick C (NPC)-linked gene products, NPC1 and NPC2, in cholesterol transport. Their work showcased the multidisciplinary nature, diversity, and vitality of cell biology. In the words of George Palade, their talks also illustrated “how cell biology could be used to understand disease and how disease could be used to discover normal cell biology.” An integrated understanding of the cellular machinery will be essential in tackling the plethora of questions and challenges posed by completion of the human genome and for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying human disease.

Fission Yeast Germinal Center (GC) Kinase Ppk11 Interacts with Pmo25 and Plays an Auxiliary Role in Concert with the Morphogenesis Orb6 Network (MOR) in Cell Morphogenesis*

Goshima, Tetsuya; Kume, Kazunori; Koyano, Takayuki; Ohya, Yoshikazu; Toda, Takashi; Hirata, Dai
Fonte: American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Publicador: American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
65.68%
How cell morphology and the cell cycle are coordinately regulated is a fundamental subject in cell biology. In fission yeast, 2 germinal center kinases (GCKs), Sid1 and Nak1, play an essential role in septation/cytokinesis and cell separation/cell polarity control, respectively, as components of the septation initiation network (SIN) and the morphogenesis Orb6 network (MOR). Here we show that a third GCK, Ppk11, is also required for efficient cell separation particularly, at a high temperature. Although Ppk11 is not essential for cell division, this kinase plays an auxiliary role in concert with MOR in cell morphogenesis. Ppk11 physically interacts with the MOR component Pmo25 and is localized to the septum, by which Ppk11 is crucial for Pmo25 targeting/accumulation to the septum. The conserved C-terminal WDF motif of Ppk11 is essential for both septum accumulation of Pmo25 and efficient cell separation. In contrast its kinase activity is required only for cell separation. Thus, both interaction of Ppk11 with Pmo25 and Ppk11 kinase activity are critical for efficient cell separation.

Importance of molecular cell biology investigations in human medicine in the story of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

Raška, Ivan
Fonte: Slovak Toxicology Society SETOX Publicador: Slovak Toxicology Society SETOX
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
65.63%
Ranged among laminopathies, Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome is a syndrome that involves premature aging, leading usually to death at the age between 10 to 14 years predominatly due to a myocardial infarction or a stroke. In the lecture I shall overview the importance of molecular cell biology investigations that led to the discovery of the basic mechanism standing behind this rare syndrome. The genetic basis in most cases is a mutation at the nucleotide position 1824 of the lamin A gene. At this position, cytosine is substituted for thymine so that a cryptic splice site within the precursor mRNA for lamin A is generated. This results in a production of abnormal lamin A, termed progerin, its presence in cells having a deleterious dominant effect. Depending on the cell type and tissue, progerin induces a pleiotropy of defects that vary in different tissues. The present endeavour how to challenge this terrible disease will be also mentioned.

A Diagnostic Assessment for Introductory Molecular and Cell Biology

Shi, Jia; Wood, William B.; Martin, Jennifer M.; Guild, Nancy A.; Vicens, Quentin; Knight, Jennifer K.
Fonte: American Society for Cell Biology Publicador: American Society for Cell Biology
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2010 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
65.79%
We have developed and validated a tool for assessing understanding of a selection of fundamental concepts and basic knowledge in undergraduate introductory molecular and cell biology, focusing on areas in which students often have misconceptions. This multiple-choice Introductory Molecular and Cell Biology Assessment (IMCA) instrument is designed for use as a pre- and posttest to measure student learning gains. To develop the assessment, we first worked with faculty to create a set of learning goals that targeted important concepts in the field and seemed likely to be emphasized by most instructors teaching these subjects. We interviewed students using open-ended questions to identify commonly held misconceptions, formulated multiple-choice questions that included these ideas as distracters, and reinterviewed students to establish validity of the instrument. The assessment was then evaluated by 25 biology experts and modified based on their suggestions. The complete revised assessment was administered to more than 1300 students at three institutions. Analysis of statistical parameters including item difficulty, item discrimination, and reliability provides evidence that the IMCA is a valid and reliable instrument with several potential uses in gauging student learning of key concepts in molecular and cell biology.

A decade of molecular cell biology: achievements and challenges

Akhtar, Asifa; Fuchs, Elaine; Mitchison, Tim; Shaw, Reuben J.; St Johnston, Daniel; Strasser, Andreas; Taylor, Susan; Walczak, Claire; Zerial, Marino
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 23/09/2011 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
65.7%
Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology celebrated its 10-year anniversary during this past year with a series of specially commissioned articles. To complement this, here we have asked researchers from across the field for their insights into how molecular cell biology research has evolved during this past decade, the key concepts that have emerged and the most promising interfaces that have developed. Their comments highlight the broad impact that particular advances have had, some of the basic understanding that we still require, and the collaborative approaches that will be essential for driving the field forward.

Education Catching Up with Science: Preparing Students for Three-Dimensional Literacy in Cell Biology

Kramer, IJsbrand M.; Dahmani, Hassen-Reda; Delouche, Pamina; Bidabe, Marissa; Schneeberger, Patricia
Fonte: American Society for Cell Biology Publicador: American Society for Cell Biology
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2012 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
65.67%
The large number of experimentally determined molecular structures has led to the development of a new semiotic system in the life sciences, with increasing use of accurate molecular representations. To determine how this change impacts students’ learning, we incorporated image tests into our introductory cell biology course. Groups of students used a single text dealing with signal transduction, which was supplemented with images made in one of three iconographic styles. Typically, we employed realistic renderings, using computer-generated Protein Data Bank (PDB) structures; realistic-schematic renderings, using shapes inspired by PDB structures; or schematic renderings, using simple geometric shapes to represent cellular components. The control group received a list of keywords. When students were asked to draw and describe the process in their own style and to reply to multiple-choice questions, the three iconographic approaches equally improved the overall outcome of the tests (relative to keywords). Students found the three approaches equally useful but, when asked to select a preferred style, they largely favored a realistic-schematic style. When students were asked to annotate “raw” realistic images, both keywords and schematic representations failed to prepare them for this task. We conclude that supplementary images facilitate the comprehension process and despite their visual clutter...

Mechanistic modeling confronts the complexity of molecular cell biology

Phair, Robert D.
Fonte: The American Society for Cell Biology Publicador: The American Society for Cell Biology
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 05/11/2014 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
85.74%
Mechanistic modeling has the potential to transform how cell biologists contend with the inescapable complexity of modern biology. I am a physiologist–electrical engineer–systems biologist who has been working at the level of cell biology for the past 24 years. This perspective aims 1) to convey why we build models, 2) to enumerate the major approaches to modeling and their philosophical differences, 3) to address some recurrent concerns raised by experimentalists, and then 4) to imagine a future in which teams of experimentalists and modelers build—and subject to exhaustive experimental tests—models covering the entire spectrum from molecular cell biology to human pathophysiology. There is, in my view, no technical obstacle to this future, but it will require some plasticity in the biological research mind-set.

miRNA-720 Controls Stem Cell Phenotype, Proliferation and Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Cells

Hara, Emilio Satoshi; Ono, Mitsuaki; Eguchi, Takanori; Kubota, Satoshi; Pham, Hai Thanh; Sonoyama, Wataru; Tajima, Shoji; Takigawa, Masaharu; Calderwood, Stuart K.; Kuboki, Takuo
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN_US
Relevância na Pesquisa
65.7%
Dental pulp cells (DPCs) are known to be enriched in stem/progenitor cells but not well characterized yet. Small non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified to control protein translation, mRNA stability and transcription, and have been reported to play important roles in stem cell biology, related to cell reprogramming, maintenance of stemness and regulation of cell differentiation. In order to characterize dental pulp stem/progenitor cells and its mechanism of differentiation, we herein sorted stem-cell-enriched side population (SP) cells from human DPCs and periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs), and performed a locked nucleic acid (LNA)-based miRNA array. As a result, miR-720 was highly expressed in the differentiated main population (MP) cells compared to that in SP cells. In silico analysis and a reporter assay showed that miR-720 targets the stem cell marker NANOG, indicating that miR-720 could promote differentiation of dental pulp stem/progenitor cells by repressing NANOG. Indeed, gain-and loss-of-function analyses showed that miR-720 controls NANOG transcript and protein levels. Moreover, transfection of miR-720 significantly decreased the number of cells positive for the early stem cell marker SSEA-4. Concomitantly, mRNA levels of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs)...

7.013 Introductory Biology, Spring 2005; Introductory Biology

Sive, Hazel L.; Jacks, Tyler; Gardel, Claudette L.
Fonte: MIT - Massachusetts Institute of Technology Publicador: MIT - Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Formato: 17199 bytes; 17584 bytes; 19922 bytes; 22998 bytes; 22804 bytes; 15456 bytes; 14746 bytes; 15525 bytes; 14965 bytes; 32529 bytes; 4717 bytes; 4586 bytes; 21366 bytes; 11602 bytes; 38351 bytes; 4755 bytes; 27322 bytes; 25313 bytes; 4039 bytes; 301 bytes; 3
EN-US
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55.84%
The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material. 7.014 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of human biology. Topics include genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, disease (infectious agents, inherited diseases and cancer), developmental biology, neurobiology and evolution.

Investigations of oomycete cell biology

Hardham, Adrienne R
Fonte: Oxford University Press: Oxford Publicador: Oxford University Press: Oxford
Tipo: Parte de Livro Formato: 29 pages
Relevância na Pesquisa
65.66%
The identification and characterisation of genes from filamentous fungi has become easier because of the rapid advances that have taken place in molecular biology, including the generation of whole genome sequences. The new challenge facing researchers is to determine the functions of genes and how they contribute to the biology of fungi. To do this, it is clear that a wide variety of different experimental techniques will be necessary, ranging from classical genetic analysis and mutant production, right through to cell biology, biochemistry and immunological methods. This book brings together detailed practical guidance from experienced researchers using the full range of these genetic, genomic, cellular and biochemical methods. The authors describe laboratory procedures that have been proven effective for the investigation of a wide variety of fungal species. They give key background information, technical tips and detailed experimental protocols, which will prove invaluable to researchers and students studying filamentous fungi.

A journey from reductionist to systemic cell biology aboard the schooner Tara

Karsenti, Eric
Fonte: The American Society for Cell Biology Publicador: The American Society for Cell Biology
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 01/07/2012 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
65.62%
In this essay I describe my personal journey from reductionist to systems cell biology and describe how this in turn led to a 3-year sea voyage to explore complex ocean communities. In describing this journey, I hope to convey some important principles that I gleaned along the way. I realized that cellular functions emerge from multiple molecular interactions and that new approaches borrowed from statistical physics are required to understand the emergence of such complex systems. Then I wondered how such interaction networks developed during evolution. Because life first evolved in the oceans, it became a natural thing to start looking at the small organisms that compose the plankton in the world's oceans, of which 98% are … individual cells—hence the Tara Oceans voyage, which finished on 31 March 2012 in Lorient, France, after a 60,000-mile around-the-world journey that collected more than 30,000 samples from 153 sampling stations.

Teaching Cell Biology to Nonscience Majors Through Forensics, or How to Design a Killer Course

Arwood, Laura
Fonte: American Society for Cell Biology Publicador: American Society for Cell Biology
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2004 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
65.66%
Nonscience majors often do not respond to traditional lecture-only biology courses. However, these students still need exposure to basic biological concepts. To accomplish this goal, forensic science was paired with compatible cell biology subjects. Several topics such as human development and molecular biology were found to fulfill this purpose. Another goal was to maximize the hands-on experience of the nonscience major students. This objective was fulfilled by specific activities such as fingerprinting and DNA typing. One particularly effective teaching tool was a mock murder mystery complete with a Grand Jury trial. Another objective was to improve students' attitudes toward science. This was successful in that students felt more confident in their own scientific abilities after taking the course. In pre/post tests, students answered four questions about their ability to conduct science. All four statements showed a positive shift after the course (p values ranging from .001 to .036...

High-throughput Screening in Embryonic Stem Cell-derived Neurons Identifies Potentiators of α-Amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate-type Glutamate Receptors

McNeish, John; Roach, Marsha; Hambor, John; Mather, Robert J.; Weibley, Laura; Lazzaro, John; Gazard, Justin; Schwarz, Jacob; Volkmann, Robert; Machacek, David; Stice, Steve; Zawadzke, Laura; O'Donnell, Christopher; Hurst, Raymond
Fonte: American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Publicador: American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
65.74%
Stem cell biology offers advantages to investigators seeking to identify new therapeutic molecules. Specifically, stem cells are genetically stable, scalable for molecular screening, and function in cellular assays for drug efficacy and safety. A key hurdle for drug discoverers of central nervous system disease is a lack of high quality neuronal cells. In the central nervous system, α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) subtype glutamate receptors mediate the vast majority of excitatory neurotransmissions. Embryonic stem (ES) cell protocols were developed to differentiate into neuronal subtypes that express AMPA receptors and were pharmacologically responsive to standard compounds for AMPA potentiation. Therefore, we hypothesized that stem cell-derived neurons should be predictive in high-throughput screens (HTSs). Here, we describe a murine ES cell-based HTS of a 2.4 × 106 compound library, the identification of novel chemical “hits” for AMPA potentiation, structure function relationship of compounds and receptors, and validation of chemical leads in secondary assays using human ES cell-derived neurons. This reporting of murine ES cell derivatives being formatted to deliver HTS of greater than 106 compounds for a specific drug target conclusively demonstrates a new application for stem cells in drug discovery. In the future new molecular entities may be screened directly in human ES or induced pluripotent stem cell derivatives.

Continuum Electrostatics in Cell Biology

Gagliardi, L. John
Fonte: Universidade Cornell Publicador: Universidade Cornell
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 06/02/2010
Relevância na Pesquisa
65.7%
Recent experiments revealing possible nanoscale electrostatic interactions in force generation at kinetochores for chromosome motions have prompted speculation regarding possible models for interactions between positively charged molecules in kinetochores and negative charge on C-termini near the plus ends of microtubules. A clear picture of how kinetochores establish and maintain a dynamic coupling to microtubules for force generation during the complex motions of mitosis remains elusive. The current paradigm of molecular cell biology requires that specific molecules, or molecular geometries, for force generation be identified. However, it is possible to account for mitotic motions within a classical electrostatics approach in terms of experimentally known cellular electric charge interacting over nanometer distances. These charges are modeled as bound surface and volume continuum charge distributions. Electrostatic consequences of intracellular pH changes during mitosis may provide a master clock for the events of mitosis.; Comment: 16 pages, 1 figure

High efficiency transfection of thymic epithelial cell lines and primary thymic epithelial cells by Nucleofection

Richard T. O'Neil; Qiaozhi Wei; Brian G. Condie
Fonte: Nature Preceedings Publicador: Nature Preceedings
Tipo: Manuscript
Relevância na Pesquisa
65.62%
Thymic epithelial cells (TECs) are required for the development and differentiation of T cells and are sufficient for the positive and negative selection of developing T cells. Although TECs play a critical role in T cell biology, simple, efficient and readily scalable methods for the transfection of TEC lines and primary TECs have not been described. We tested the efficiency of Nucleofection for the transfection of 4 different mouse thymic epithelial cell lines that had been derived from cortical or medullary epithelium. We also tested primary mouse thymic epithelial cells isolated from fetal and postnatal stages. We found that Nucleofection was highly efficient for the transfection of thymic epithelial cells, with transfection efficiencies of 30-70% for the cell lines and 15-35% for primary TECs with low amounts of cell death. Efficient transfection by Nucleofection can be performed with established cortical and medullary thymic epithelial cell lines as well as primary TECs isolated from E15.5 day fetal thymus or postnatal day 3 or 30 thymus tissue. The high efficiency of Nucleofection for TEC transfection will enable the use of TEC lines in high throughput transfection studies and simplifies the transfection of primary TECs for in vitro or in vivo analysis.

Applications Of Microspectroscopy, Hyperspectral Chemical Imaging And Fluorescence Microscopy In Chemistry, Biochemistry, Biotechnology, Molecular And Cell Biology

I. C. Baianu
Fonte: Nature Preceedings Publicador: Nature Preceedings
Tipo: Manuscript
Relevância na Pesquisa
65.69%
Chemical imaging is a technique for the simultaneous measurement of spectra (chemical information) and images or pictures (spatial information)^1,2^. The technique is most often applied to either solid or gel samples, and has applications in chemistry, biology^3-8^, medicine^9,10^, pharmacy^11^ (see also for example: Chemical Imaging Without Dyeing), food science, Food Physical Chemistry, Biotechnology^12,13^, Agriculture and industry. NIR, IR and Raman chemical imaging is also referred to as hyperspectral, spectroscopic, spectral or multi-spectral imaging (also see micro-spectroscopy). However, other ultra-sensitive and selective, chemical imaging techniques are also in use that involve either UV-visible or fluorescence microspectroscopy.

Complex Systems Biology of Organisms

I. C. Baianu
Fonte: Nature Preceedings Publicador: Nature Preceedings
Tipo: Manuscript
Relevância na Pesquisa
75.7%
Complex Systems Biology models and theories are axiomatically defined in terms of concrete categories and organismic supercategories (OS) to include both complete self-reproduction of logically defined pi-entities founded in Quine's logic and dynamic system diagrams subject to both algebraic and topological transformations. Mathematical models of complex organisms are expressed in terms of category theory and organismic supercategories (OS). OS theories have applications in: Bioinformatics, Developmental Biology, Genomics and Molecular Cell Biology