Página 1 dos resultados de 31 itens digitais encontrados em 0.025 segundos

Camelia???s Truths in "Unicamente la verdad": Narrative, History, and Musical Gesture [abstract only]

Carballo, Erick
Fonte: Latin American Music Center Publicador: Latin American Music Center
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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Gabriela Ortiz???s opera ??nicamente la verdad (2008) was inspired by historical figures and events surrounding the narcocorrido ???Contrabando y Traici??n??? by Los Tigres del Norte. In reality as in the opera, the causal relationship between history and art is reversed; traditionally, the narcocorrido narrates and also possibly editorializes about events that have already occurred in the drug trade between the United States and Mexico. Ortiz???s opera instead presents a series of multiple and contradictory real-life events and characters that were generated by the fictional narrative in the narcocorrido. These widely varying ???truths??????in the midst of an opera whose title implies that we expect only one truth???underscore the social complexity of the drug trafficking problem, and open the conversation to include many truths in a broader narrative. My presentation explores how ??nicamente la verdad projects such a plurality of truths from a musical perspective by exploring how particular musical gestures are presented in varying ways according to the ???truth??? that is being presented in each moment.

Double Meanings in Carlos Chavez???s Horsepower [abstract only[

Gibson, Christina Taylor
Fonte: Latin American Music Center Publicador: Latin American Music Center
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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Gala crowds braved torrential rain and thunder to see the premiere of Carlos Ch??vez???s ballet H.P. (Horsepower or Caballos de Vapor) on March 31, 1932. The performance was directed by Leopold Stokowski, choreographed by Catherine Littlefield, and featured sets and costumes by Diego Rivera. It marked the first major performance of Ch??vez???s music in the U.S. Advance publicity emphasized a utopian Pan-American reading of the scenario; it advertised the composer???s use of son, tango, and zandunga, Rivera???s tropical fruit costumes, and Stokowski???s research trips to Mexico. A close study of Ch??vez???s manuscript score indicates, however, that the composer???s public support of a Pan-American reading was contradicted by the quasi-hidden dystopic program evident in the score. There the son and zandunga are overwhelmed by aggressive, dissonant, mechanical ???Northern??? sounds, closely identified with the U.S. Although Ch??vez managed to conceal his true program from Stokowski, Littlefield, and U.S. critics???the overt message of American cooperation was far more appealing than the co-optation represented in the score???the existence of the alternate program wrecked havoc on the necessarily collaborative art of ballet production...

Music in the Bernardo Mendel Collection [abstract only]

Gordillo, Bernard
Fonte: Latin American Music Center Publicador: Latin American Music Center
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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In late January of 1969, musicologist Robert M. Stevenson visited the Lilly Library at Indiana University, where he requested permission to study three Latin American manuscripts???Ram??rez del Aguila???s Noticias politicas and two others simply labeled ???Peru??? and ???Guatemala.??? His visit, the first of several undertaken over a period of many years, was most likely due to an open invitation extended by the library just months before. The manuscripts that Stevenson studied, and from which he would later refer to in his writings, were all part of the Mendel Collection???a unique and extensive archive focused on the Spanish Empire in Latin America and the Philippines???whose foundation was the personal library of Austrian businessman Bernardo Mendel. Now containing approximately 40,000 printed items and 26,000 manuscripts, which embrace the Age of Discovery through the early 20th Century, the collection has been at the library for five decades, in which time its reputation as one of the largest in the United States has not only grown, but attracted much interest from many a scholar. Of particular consideration is the music contained within the collection. And while modest in comparison to other areas, it is nonetheless significant for a handful of items...

Sinfonia Amaz??nica: Amazing and Barely Known [full paper]

Guerrini Jr, Irineu
Fonte: Latin American Music Center Publicador: Latin American Music Center
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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In 1953, a young Brazilian film maker, Anelio Latini Filho, launched what would be the first Brazilian full length animation film: Sinfonia Amaz??nica, with stories based on Amazon legends. Greatly inspired by the Disney style, and especially by Fantasia, Latini made his film almost on his own. It took him five years and about 500,000 drawings to get it finished. It was a near-incredible feat considering the conditions of Brazilian cinema at that time. The music of Sinfonia Amaz??nica is of two kinds: there is a lot of standard classical music in the manner of Fantasia and even a sequence that resembles very much one of those of Walt Disney???s production. But unlike Disney`s films, Latini used already existing records. Opening the film, there is a making of that shows how he worked with those discs and also with music scores to get the images synchronized with the music. Latini hired a small orchestra to play the original music of the film, composed by Latini???s brother, H??lio Latini, in a style that resembles the American animation film music style of the time, complete with some ???mickeymousing.??? Maybe the most interesting music sequence is that of a jabuti (a kind of turtle) that plays a chorinho on its flute, performed in the soundtrack by Altamiro Carrilho...

The Rockefeller Foundation and Latin American Music during the Cold War: Meeting Points of Music, Policy, and Philanthropy [abstract only]

Herrera, Eduardo
Fonte: Latin American Music Center Publicador: Latin American Music Center
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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In the beginning of the 1960s the Rockefeller Foundation gave two grants for the study of Latin American music. Their aim was to help the creation of institutions that would provide a ???sustaining environment in which cultural work may flourish.??? The first grant was for the Centro de Altos Estudios Musicales at the Torcuato Di Tella Institute in Buenos Aires, Argentina, which under the leadership of Alberto Ginastera offered advanced training in musical composition. The second grant was given to Indiana University, Bloomington, ???to establish the first center in the United States for the study and performance of Latin American music???1 under the direction of Juan Orrego-Salas. Major emphasis was to be put on the cooperation between both centers. Behind these two projects was John P. Harrison, Assistant Director for Humanities at the Rockefeller Foundation. Studies on public and private support for the arts, often called the ???economics of the arts,??? frequently fail to recognize the personal connections between the people formulating foreign policy, pushing forward specific corporate interests, and deploying resources through grants, endowments and donations. By looking at the Rockefeller Foundation???s project to create the CLAEM in Buenos Aires...

Music and Pan Americanism: New Directions in Historiography [abstract only]

Hess, Carol A.
Fonte: Latin American Music Center Publicador: Latin American Music Center
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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What do we in the United States know about Latin American art music and how do we know it? For several decades now, our understanding of this repertory has been informed by constructions of difference, often sustained by exoticist, nationalist, or essentialist rhetoric. One scholar, for example, proposes that Latin American music is filled with ???irresistible, exotic color??? whereas another proffers unelaborated references to ???national effect??? and ???national character.??? As for essentialism, adjectives such as ???distinctive??? or ???characteristic??? abound, ensuring that Latin American art music is perceived as ???particular and thus oppositional,??? to quote Ruth A. Solie???s pioneering study of musicology and difference. Indeed, as recently as 2005 one US scholar argued that Aaron Copland was attracted to Latin American music for its ???potential for transgression.??? Yet things were not always this way. From the 1920s through the early 1950s, any number of US critics, scholars, composers, and performers considered Latin American music in terms of what Kofi Agawu has called ???embracing sameness.??? Instead of situating some tantalizing Other in a ???colorful??? South-of-the-border locale, these historical actors embraced universalism...

Bordering Spaces and Encounters in Music of Gabriela Ortiz [abstract only]

Kielian-Gilbert, Marianne
Fonte: Latin American Music Center Publicador: Latin American Music Center
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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The Mexican city of Cuidad Ju??rez, Chihauhaua, across the river from El Paso, Texas, has become a flashpoint for the complex of values of border relations between the United States and Mexico. Two works of Mexican composer Gabriela Ortiz confront ever-present problems of drug trafficking and violent death (the ???disappeared women of Cuidad???) in, respectively, her video-opera ????nicamente la verdad! (Only the Truth!) (2008-10) and 2009 ???requiem??? setting R??o Bravo for six female voices and crystal cups to text by M??nica S??nchez Escuer. ????nicamente la verdad! crosses boundaries of fact and fiction, myth and reality, documentary, opera, and corrido (Mexican ballad). Drawing on specific journalistic reports, it explores border imaginations of Camelia La Tejana, a woman fictionalized in the narcocorrido Contrabando y traici??n (Smuggling and Betrayal) made popular by the norte??o music band Los Tigres del Norte in the 1970s. In multiple musical references (corrido, la m??sica ranchera, cumbia del norte, art/popular music), scene five enacts the journalist C??sar G??emes???s interview of Camelia Mar??a, one of the ???Camelias??? of the opera, and her resistance to his attempt to pin down the ???real??? Camelia. Ortiz???s 2009 work...

Exotic Birds, Awkwardly Scattered and Generally Spluttering: Silvestre Revueltas Vis-a-vis US Pan-Americanism [abstract only]

Kolb Neuhaus, Roberto
Fonte: Latin American Music Center Publicador: Latin American Music Center
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN_US
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According to reception theory, change of context adds as much meaning to a work of art as it may take away. This is all the more so in the case of music, since, as opposed to that of figurative expression, its meaning is naturally elusive and multiple, and hence marvelously pliable when captured by the pen of historians and critics or verbalized by audiences after a concert. A composer may consequently disregard the issue of meaning reception entirely, assuming and accepting that his authorial purport cannot and will not be grasped. Then again, he/she may go out of his way to prepare his listeners by verbally or otherwise establishing a context, leading them in a specific semantic direction. Or, recognizing that reception follows needs of its own in a specific cultural realm, he/she may choose to capitalize on such needs by means of a strategy that can, but need not be related to compositional intent. US Pan Americanism during the thirties looked south of the border aiming to find not only the usual exotic difference, but also a modern likeness that would justify its brotherly goal. Mexican writers such as Tablada, painters such as Rivera, and composers such as Ch??vez en Revueltas, where aware of such political and cultural strivings and made strategic use of such expectations. The present paper examines in this light the reception of Revueltas???s early avant-gardist musical constructs among US audiences...

Roque Cordero (1917???2008) in the United States [full paper]

Labonville, Marie
Fonte: Latin American Music Center Publicador: Latin American Music Center
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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Roque Cordero is universally acknowledged as Panama???s finest composer. Like many Latin American musicians of his generation, he was an energetic, visionary man of multiple talents that included composing, writing, conducting, and teaching. During his long career he was honored with numerous national and international commissions, awards, and recognitions. Most of his compositions are based on the twelve-tone technique, which he used with some freedom. He imparted Panamanian flavor to many of these works by his use of folk rhythms and his careful choice of pitch materials. Cordero was largely self-taught as a composer until, in 1943, he began seven years of musical study in the United States. In 1950 he returned to Panama, eager to improve music education in his country and create a truly professional symphony orchestra. During the next sixteen years, however, he faced a series of political and economic obstacles that were mitigated only slightly in 1957 when he gained international recognition as a composer. In 1966, frustrated and disappointed, he left Panama to accept a three-year post at Indiana University as assistant director of the Latin American Music Center and teacher of composition. After that he found other professional opportunities in the United States...

Alcajazz: Afro-Peruvian Forms of Musical Knowledge and the Shaping of Afro-Peruvian Jazz [abstract only]

Le??n, Javier
Fonte: Latin American Music Center Publicador: Latin American Music Center
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN_US
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This paper is focused on the recent collaboration between local jazz and Afro-Peruvian musicians to develop a new, locally rooted style of jazz that uses Afro-Peruvian musical genres as a departure point. While there have been prior attempts at such musical synthesis can be traced back to the late 1970s, I argue that a shift in perspective among the latest generation of jazz both jazz and Afro-Peruvian musicians has led to more fruitful working relationship. Specifically, I suggest that jazz musicians have increasingly come to acknowledge and value their Afro-Peruvian counterparts for having access to distinct forms of musical and cultural knowledge that are deemed vital to the development of this new jazz idiom. To this end, I will look at the music of Gabriel Alegr??a and the Afro-Peruvian Sextet, playing particular attention to how stylistic features of Alegr??a???s music have grown out of an ongoing dialogue among band members with markedly different social, ethnic, and musical backgrounds. I will also explore the broader implications that this new type of collaboration has for rooting Afro-Peruvian jazz among the larger Afro-Peruvian musical community rather than remaining predominantly a middle class and upper middle class activity at the hands of musicians who are not of African descent.

Olin Downes and the Reception of Latin American Composers in the United States [abstract only]

Lopes, Luiz Fernando
Fonte: Latin American Music Center Publicador: Latin American Music Center
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN_US
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Olin Downes, influential music critic of the New York Times from 1924 until his death in 1955, was an indefatigable supporter of contemporary music and his interest extended to Latin American composers such as Carlos Ch??vez, Alberto Ginastera, Camargo Guarnieri, and Heitor Villa-Lobos. Downes???s reviews and newspaper pieces in relation to the New York World???s Fair from 1939 were especially instrumental in consolidating the reputation of Villa-Lobos in the United States. Downes thought highly of Ch??vez not only as a composer but also as a conductor, whom he compared in favorable terms to Arturo Toscanini???s tenure with the New York Philharmonic. Downes established a particularly enthusiastic relationship with Villa-Lobos and his music, about which he wrote more often than that of any other composer from Latin America. The Brazilian composer reciprocated in kind by dedicating to Downes his Symphony No. 8 from 1950. This paper examines Downes???s music criticism in the New York Times, especially his reviews of Latin American music performances, as well as his papers and unpublished correspondence, which mostly survive at the University of Georgia in Athens. Although it is clear that Olin Downes???s support of Latin American music was indefatigable and genuine...

Singing Blackness across Borders. Capeyuye and Mascogo Identity in Northern Mexico [abstract only]

Madrid, Alejandro L.
Fonte: Latin American Music Center Publicador: Latin American Music Center
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN_US
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This paper takes capeyuye [spiritual singing] as a point of departure to study the Mascogos??? continuous struggle to define themselves as binational people, as Afro- Seminoles living in Coahuila, Mexico. By reflecting on the intersections of race, nationality, and the body within the specificities of Mascogo border culture and history, the paper problematizes Anne Anlin Cheng???s notion of ???racial melancholia,??? suggesting that self rejection might be a more strategic move than she acknowledges to be. In the end, the author coins the term ???dialectical soundings??? and propose that the singing of spirituals among the Mascogos in fact renders Blackness visible in the context of the Mexican border essentialist racial discourses.

Music schools and musical activity in 17th Century New Mexico Missions [full paper]

Lozano, Tom??s
Fonte: Latin American Music Center Publicador: Latin American Music Center
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN_US
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Before borders were established between Mexico and the US as we know it today, a great section of the latter was previously part of New Spain. This paper will present a part of musical history that to this day remains dimly recognized. By taking Franciscan documents from the 17th Century, I will demonstrate that by 1630 there proved to be large amounts of musical activity, including orchestras, performed by natives from La Provincia de la Nuevo M??jico???what today is New Mexico. They played musical instruments including chirim??as, bajones, trumpets, and organs, and sang Gregorian and polyphonic chants, following the same pattern and structure of all other missions in New Spain. Among other activities, the missions assumed the role of teaching both how to read and write music. I will even say that the craft of musical instrument making also took place at the missions of La Provincia de la Nuevo M??jico. The musical activity that transpired in these missions during the 17th century will perhaps always retain an air of mystery, but enough documentation exists to offer a window into the past. All this activity occurred more than one hundred years before the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo (1848) in which Mexico ceded its lands to the US Government. New Mexico became then a US Territory but was not a member of the Union until 1912. This music schools from La Provincia de la Nuevo M??jico were the first music schools of what today is the United States.

Increasing Cultural Awareness through Choral Music [full paper]

Meisten, Kimberly D.
Fonte: Latin American Music Center Publicador: Latin American Music Center
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN_US
Relevância na Pesquisa
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This paper examines the impact of a unique community engagement program called ??Cantar??!, which places Mexican composers in Minnesota classrooms to serve as composers-in-residence. Since 2008, the Minnesota-based chorus VocalEssence has connected eight different Mexican composers with more than 20 school, college and community choruses. Urban, suburban and rural communities have participated. The composers work directly with the singers and write new choral works specifically for each group. Through the VocalEssence !Cantar??! program, more than 5000 people have heard 35 new choral works, commissioned and premiered in community concerts throughout the state. The paper will clarify the effects of the program on audiences, composers and performers by reviewing evaluation results and exploring the cross-cultural influences of the compositions. Data has been collected from student, teacher and composer surveys; teacher and student focus groups; classroom observations; Cultural Advisory Committee meeting notes; audience and budget statistics; and related ??Cantar??! educational resources developed for music teachers and conductors. Key findings reinforce the profound impact of the arts (in this case, contemporary choral music) in the assimilation process of immigrant populations. As the public face of the immigrant group...

Audioscapes: Interpreting Nationalistic Perspectives Through Transnational Death Metal (Band: Brujeria) [abstract only]

Mena, Michael
Fonte: Latin American Music Center Publicador: Latin American Music Center
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN_US
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The California-based Mexican-American ???activist??? metal band Brujeria, uses a powerful, yet conflicting, blend of nihilism, anarchism, and racism with a dose of hyper-patriotism in its attempt to convey the voice of oppressed Mexicans on both sides of the border. My research on this band has revealed a peculiar concentration of live performances along the U.S.-Mexico border. While it is uncertain whether or not Brujeria is intentionally political, their live performances and song lyrics are highly critical of both the U.S. and Mexico regarding immigration policy, border-crossing, and other issues which have resonated among the binational youth of South Texas and Northeastern Mexico (locally referred to as ???border kids???). In this paper I explore the conflicting notions of space, performativity, binationality and U.S. Mexico relations within the context of Brujeria performances in the South Texas Borderlands. As a participant/observer of the South Texas Death Metal scene, I have witnessed the emotional impact that Brujeria has on border kids. This audience is deeply confused about its social identity, and Brujeria appear to have developed a devoted following by tapping into the emotions of such a volatile binational youth audience. While on the surface...

The Danz??n and Caribbean Musical Influences on Early Jazz [abstract only]

Moore, Robin
Fonte: Latin American Music Center Publicador: Latin American Music Center
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN_US
Relevância na Pesquisa
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Music scholars have long lamented the lack of historical data describing the emergence of early jazz repertoire in New Orleans. Not only do no recordings of the music exist prior to 1917, but few written sources from the turn of the twentieth century make any mention of the emergent musical style. As a result, many studies describe jazz as the invention of a few almost mythical figures in isolation, with little reference to earlier performance practice. This paper uses an analysis of the earliest recordings of the Cuban danz??n, dating from 1905, as a window into the formative years of jazz. The danz??n is especially significant as the first African-American music ever recorded, and a style known to have been performed in New Orleans beginning in the late 1880s. Analysis suggests (1) that many parallels in form, rhythm, and style exist between the danz??n and dixieland repertoire, and (2) that instrumentation associated with the final ???hot??? (partially improvised) sections of the danz??n bear striking similarities to the clarinet-trumpet-trombone frontline of dixieland. The danz??n may well have contributed directly to the development of jazz; danz??n style ties jazz to broader regional developments, and underscores the fact that the histories of Latin American music and music in the United States are fundamentally intertwined.

Musical Analysis of 16 Poesil??dios for Piano, by Almeida Prado, According to Analytical Techniques Developed by American Theorists [full paper]

Moreira, Adriana Lopes da Cunha
Fonte: Latin American Music Center Publicador: Latin American Music Center
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN_US
Relevância na Pesquisa
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This work presents a musical analysis of structural and pertaining to surface aspects in the 16 Poesil??dios for piano, by the Brazilian composer Almeida Prado (1943-2010). It focuses on aspects of study, analysis and promote of contemporary Brazilian music, as a contribution for its bibliography. The methodology unites a brief biography of the composer; the division of his work into four phases; the presentation of excerpts by a compact disc with the pieces played by the researcher that presents this work, as well as photos of the paintings that have suggested the composition of some Poesil??dios; interviews with some artists to whom some pieces are dedicated, and an interview with the composer with his consideration about his own compositions are also included. It also explores aspects in relation to tempo, dynamics, timbre, texture and structure, with special emphasis on set theory, and proposes an association between musical analysis techniques developed during the twentieth and the twenty-first centuries, presented by authors like Felix Salzer (1982) and Joseph Straus (2005). Therefore, it defends the approach of a work conceived by one of the most relevant Brazilian composers after Heitor Villa-Lobos, which work is analyzed according to techniques developed by American theorists and analysts. The conclusion verifies possible interactions between all these aspects...

Ragtime traces in the Brazilian choro Segura ele! [Hold him!] by Pixinguinha: composition and performance hybridization after the trip to Paris in 1922 [full paper]

Bor??m, Fausto; Moreira J??nior, Nilton Ant??nio
Fonte: Latin American Music Center Publicador: Latin American Music Center
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN_US
Relevância na Pesquisa
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Analytical study about Segura ele! (Hold him!) and Um a zero (One by Zero), two choros by Brazilian composer and performer Alfredo da Rocha Vianna, known as Pixinguinha (1897-1973), the leading figure of the genre in the twentieth century. It is well known that after the historical trip of his choro group Oito Batutas (Eight Smarties) to Paris in 1922, where he met American jazz musicians, Pixinguinha introduced some stylistic innovations in the performance practices of choro. It shows traits of ragtime in Segura ele! and features of traditional choro, (a Brazilian popular music genre), in Um a zero, departing from lead sheets (PIXINGUINHA, 1919, 1929), historical recordings (PIXINGUINHA, 1998) and iconographic information. A comparison among formal, harmonic, rhythmic, motivic, instrumentation and iconographic elements reveal that Pixinguinha??s choro style was influenced by the US popular music genre in several levels, in the song Segura ele!. There is, still, a comparison between similar motives from Segura ele! and The Entertainer, composed by Scott Joplin, the most important composer of ragtime. Some considerations by Scott Joplin about how to play the ragtime are observed in the recording of Segura ele!. Finally, it is possible to visualize the difference between Um a zero that was composed in 1919...

Walt Disney and Diplomacy: The Musical Impact of Aquarela do Brasil [full paper]

Berndt Morris, Elizabeth; Morris, Charles
Fonte: Latin American Music Center Publicador: Latin American Music Center
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN_US
Relevância na Pesquisa
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In a diplomatic attempt to create cultural exchange between Latin American countries and the United States, Disney Pictures created the film Saludos Amigos in 1942. The film Saludos Amigos was a combination of four independently conceived cartoon shorts regarding Latin America. This paper will concentrate on the final of the four cartoon shorts, Aquarela do Brasil. Aquarela do Brasil was created with the specific cultural function of improving relations with Brazil before entering World War II as requested and funded by the United States Government. The strategy of Franklin Roosevelt???s Latin American policy was cultural sharing with the goal of demonstrating how both cultures are similar and to strengthen cultural ties. In 1941, to accomplish the task of creating Saludos Amigos, Disney and a crew of writers, artists, and one musician, explored first-hand a variety of Latin American cultures. Disney and his crew chose to spend the majority of their time in Rio de Janeiro, using it as headquarters for their time in South America. As a result, the cartoon short Aquarela do Brasil, based in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, is much more detailed and accurate. The cultural impact of Aquarela do Brasil???s music was significant and played a large role in the popularization of the samba in North America during the 1940s and 50s. Furthermore...

An??lisis musical con fines interpretativos de la obra Cuatro piezas caracter??sticas para corno en Fa solo Op.233 no 1 del compositor Blas Emilio Atehort??a

Restrepo Guzm??n, Jairo Alexander
Fonte: Universidad EAFIT; Maestr??a en M??sica; Escuela de Ciencias y Humanidades. Departamento de M??sica Publicador: Universidad EAFIT; Maestr??a en M??sica; Escuela de Ciencias y Humanidades. Departamento de M??sica
Tipo: masterThesis; info:eu-repo/semantics/masterThesis; Tesis de Maestr??a; acceptedVersion
SPA
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