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State-Funded Fictions: The NEA and the Making of American Literature After 1965

Doherty, Margaret
Fonte: Harvard University Publicador: Harvard University
Tipo: Thesis or Dissertation; text Formato: application/pdf
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
45.84%
This dissertation studies the effects of a patronage institution, the National Endowment for the Arts Literature Program, on American literary production in the postwar era. Though American writers had long cultivated informal relationships with government patrons, the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) reflected a new investment in the aesthetic life of the nation. By awarding grants to citizens without independent resources for work yet to be produced, it changed both the demographics of authorship and the idea of the “professional” writer. The grants also generated new themes for fiction as well as new civic roles for writers themselves. The central argument of “State-Funded Fictions” is literary-historical: state funding resulted in the development of what I call the compromise aesthetic: fiction that combines realism and experimentalism in order to appeal to readers across the educational (and political) spectrum. This is the resolution of a set of dynamic tensions inherent in welfare state liberalism and enacted by writers involved in the agency’s initiatives. Ralph Ellison, a public servant and an architect of the NEA Literature Program, championed the artist’s individual freedom as a way of advancing the collective good. Tillie Olsen advocated for a more democratic literary world with more accessible resources...

Forms of freedom : aesthetics, law, and politics in the American Renaissance

Hannum, Dustin E. (1979 - ); Michael, John (1953 - )
Fonte: University of Rochester Publicador: University of Rochester
Tipo: Tese de Doutorado Formato: Number of Pages:vii, 244 leaves
ENG
Relevância na Pesquisa
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Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Rochester. Dept. of English, 2012.; Forms of Freedom: Aesthetics, Law, and Politics in the American Renaissance reconsiders the relationship between aesthetics and democratic authority during the most tumultuous period of American history: the decade before the Civil War. It argues that, for antebellum Americans, aesthetics and law were not just related, but mutually informing categories. The United States’ emergent national identity hinged on both its perception of itself as a nation devoted to universal principles of justice and democratic sovereignty—in a word, “freedom”—and the preservation of those sacred principles by foundational texts that gave formal expression to them. This was a particular problem for the United States in the 1850s, as the nation became increasingly divided over the conflict between its abstract and universalist ideals, and its established legal and political institutions—notably slavery. The simultaneous and conflicting emphasis on the authority of texts, the autonomy of the individual, and the need for rational consensus thus created fundamental dilemmas that troubled Americans deeply during the period that was long seen as a time of the cultural flowering of the potentialities of democracy. This dissertation argues...

Tracking our country in settler literature

Leane, Jeanine
Fonte: Association for the Study of Australian Literature Publicador: Association for the Study of Australian Literature
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: 17 pages
Relevância na Pesquisa
45.73%
This is a narrative paper that tracks a story of Aboriginal representation and the concept of nation across the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries through some important Australian texts. I read this assemblage of settler literature through the cultural metaphor of tracking, because tracking is as much about anticipation as it is following. Tracking is about reading: reading land and people before and after whitefellas. It is about entering into the consciousness of the person or people of interest. Tracking is not just about reading the physical signs; it is about reading the mind. It is not just about seeing and hearing what is there; it is as much about what is not there. Tony Morrisson wrote of mapping ‘the critical geography’ (3) of the white literary imagination in her work on Africanist presence in American Literature, Playing in the Dark. This paper tracks the settler imagination on Aboriginal presence in Australian literature in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries.

Friends in feathers and fur, and other neighbors

Johonnot, James, 1823-1888; American Book Company ( Publisher )
Fonte: American Book Company; American Book Company ( New York ) Publicador: American Book Company; American Book Company ( New York )
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: 136 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.
Publicado em // ENGLISH
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45.86%
(Statement of Responsibility) by James Johonnot.; Contains fiction and non-fiction.; (Funding) Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Friends in feathers and fur, and other neighbors

Johonnot, James, 1823-1888; American Book Company ( Publisher )
Fonte: American Book Company ( New York ) Publicador: American Book Company ( New York )
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: 136 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.
Publicado em // ENGLISH
Relevância na Pesquisa
45.84%
(Statement of Responsibility) by James Johonnot.; Contains fiction and non-fiction.; (Funding) Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Old James, the Irish pedlar; Old James

Tuckey, Mary B.; American Sunday-School Union.; American Sunday School Union Committee of Publication
Fonte: American Sunday-School Union, 1122 Chestnut Street,; American Sunday-School Union, 1122 Chestnut Street, ( Philadelphia, New York, Boston ) Publicador: American Sunday-School Union, 1122 Chestnut Street,; American Sunday-School Union, 1122 Chestnut Street, ( Philadelphia, New York, Boston )
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: 98, 2 p., 1 leaf of plates : ill. ; 16 cm.
Publicado em //1851 ENGLISH
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45.87%
In verse.; Last leaf blank.; "Old James" -- Upper board.; Electronic version available on the World Wide Web as part of the PALMM Project "Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1850-1869 (NEH PA-23536-00)".; (Funding) Brittle Books Program; (Funding) Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1850-1869 (NEH PA-23536-00).

The career of the missed encounter in classic american literature

Rabhi, Wadia
Fonte: Université de Montréal Publicador: Université de Montréal
Tipo: Thèse ou Mémoire numérique / Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
45.88%
Cette dissertation explore la carrière de la rencontre manquée Lacanienne dans la littérature canonique américaine du dix-neuvième siècle à travers le prisme de la psychanalyse, la déconstruction, le postmodernisme et le postcolonialisme. Je me concentre particulièrement sur La Lettre Écarlate de Hawthorne et Moby-Dick de Melville, en montrant comment ils sont investis dans l'économie narrative de la rencontre manquée, l'économie de ce qui est au-delà de la symbolisation et l'assimilation. L’introduction examine les contours et les détours historiques, philosophiques et théoriques du concept de la rencontre manquée. Cette dissertation a donc deux objectifs: d'une part, elle tente d'examiner le statut et la fonction de la rencontre manquée dans la littérature américaine du dix-neuvième siècle, et d’autre part, elle explore comment la théorisation de la rencontre manquée pourrait nous aider à aller au-delà de la théorisation binaire qui caractérise les scènes géopolitiques actuelles. Mon premier chapitre sur La Lettre Écarlate de Hawthorne, tente de tracer la carrière du signifiant comme une navette entre l'archive et l'avenir, entre le sujet et l'objet, entre le signifiant et le signifié. Le but de ce chapitre est de rendre compte de la temporalité du signifiant et la temporalité de la subjectivité et d’expliquer comment ils répondent à la temporalité du tuché. En explorant la dimension crypto-temporelle de la rencontre manquée...

Matters of State: American Literature in the Civil Rights Era

Gram, Margaret Hunt
Fonte: Harvard University Publicador: Harvard University
Tipo: Thesis or Dissertation
EN_US
Relevância na Pesquisa
45.96%
"Matters of State: American Literature in the Civil Rights Era" argues that American writers engaged with the American civil rights movement as it unfolded by turning their attention to the state and the state's relationship to its subjects and by imagining new forms for both. Postwar American literary culture, then, understood racial inequality not solely as a problem of identity and difference, nor simply as an economic problem, but as a problem of formal citizenship. Between around 1948 and around 1968, that problem as such spurred diverse and unruly literary inquiries into a range of matters of state, each taken up in dialogue with American constitutional law and each also a meditation on the particular capacities of literary art as a site for political thinking. William Faulkner and Flannery O'Connor tried to reimagine the structure of federalism; James Baldwin and Harper Lee interrogated the real workings of democracy; Chester Himes and Sam Greenlee asked whether social movements ought to collaborate with the existing U.S. state in the first place; Norman Mailer, William Styron, Amiri Baraka, and others reoriented literary culture toward a new, post-civil-rights set of questions. Read as one archive, the novels and plays and essays that they produced tell a new story about American literature at midcentury: a story about literature's quasi-autonomous engagement with the political-theoretical questions that racial inequality had rendered urgent. They remind us of the complexity of history itself...

Recording Oral Traditions in American Indian Communities: Some Basic Considerations

Field, Margaret
Fonte: Universidade de Cambridge Publicador: Universidade de Cambridge
Tipo: Conferência ou Objeto de Conferência
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
45.72%
World Oral Literature Project Workshop 2010; Oral traditions serve as linguistic structures that help reinforce cultural values and group identity. This is particularly true of American Indian stories that contain moral content, and are typically aimed at young audiences. This paper discusses how such stories, commonly known as ?coyote stories?, form an important body of knowledge that not only represents cultural values and philosophical orientations, but teaches them to their listeners. Communities view their oral traditions as public evidence of a communal identity, and it is therefore incumbent upon academics to find ways to build bridges between existing bodies of scholarship and the needs of traditionally oral communities to assure the future of their identities. Multimedia formats are particularly suited to this purpose in that they work to bridge pre-literate languages with contemporary contexts. This paper will discuss these issues in relation to the Kumiai community and endangered language of Baja California, Mexico, where a collaborative project aims to create multimedia teaching materials for use in community schools.

Disruption and DisFunktion: Locating a Funk Sensorium in Twentieth Century African American Literature

Wasserman, Casey
Fonte: Universidade Duke Publicador: Universidade Duke
Tipo: Dissertação
Publicado em //2011
Relevância na Pesquisa
45.89%

This dissertation examines the way in which funk music, in the context of twentieth century African American literature, operates as a means of stimulating the sensorium. Funk, narrowly defined as a musical form, once carried negative connotations. Whether understood as depression, a genre of popular music, an odor, or as a euphemism for sex, the genre is concerned with attitude and visible emotions. Much work has been done in the field of African American literature regarding jazz and blues, and studies of hip-hop are gaining traction. Funk, however, has not fulfilled its potential for investigating its affect of musical performance or its connection to narratives. This project is an examination of the aesthetics of this musical form, which will generate more nuanced readings of musical and literary narratives of the 1960s and 1970s through an analysis of sound and its sensorial variants. I examine the function of music in a literary text as opposed to how it is described.

Funk operates as a link between the jazz- and blues-inspired poetry and novels of the early twentieth century on the one hand and the emergence of "urban," "street," or "hip-hop" narratives on the other. Its artistic intervention in social relationships brings the aesthetic and political into conversation. I argue against the binary differentiating "serious" and "popular" musical forms; funk bridges the gap between these two designations in an important context...

Henry James: Ethnographer of American Women in Victorian Patriarchy

Halbert, Christine
Fonte: Universidade Duke Publicador: Universidade Duke
Tipo: Tese de Doutorado
Publicado em //2011
Relevância na Pesquisa
45.72%

This paper examines the social question: is 19th century women's identity socially determined or do 19th century women have the liberty to forge their own identities as they see fit? In order to answer this question, this paper treats Henry James as ethnographer and "Daisy Miller" and The Portrait of a Lady as ethnographies of American women in Victorian Europe. The primary focus of this paper is Isabel Archer and how she is constructed from Henry James's Daisy Miller and George Eliot's Gwendolen Harleth, in order to demonstrate that while 19th century women were victimized by the tyranny of Victorian patriarchy, 19th century women were also capable of resisting and subverting normative Victorian social expectations for women.

; Thesis

Sympathy for the Devil: Volatile Masculinities in Recent German and American Literatures

Knight, Mary Leslie
Fonte: Universidade Duke Publicador: Universidade Duke
Tipo: Dissertação
Publicado em //2011
Relevância na Pesquisa
45.81%

This study investigates how an ambivalence surrounding men and masculinity has been expressed and exploited in Pop literature since the late 1980s, focusing on works by German-speaking authors Christian Kracht and Benjamin Lebert and American author Bret Easton Ellis. I compare works from the United States with German and Swiss novels in order to reveal the scope - as well as the national particularities - of these troubled gender identities and what it means in the context of recent debates about a "crisis" in masculinity in Western societies. My comparative work will also highlight the ways in which these particular literatures and cultures intersect, invade, and influence each other.

In this examination, I demonstrate the complexity and success of the critical projects subsumed in the works of three authors too often underestimated by intellectual communities. At the same time, I reveal the very structure and language of these critical projects as a safe haven for "male fantasies" of gender difference and identity formation long relegated to the distant past, fantasies that continue to lurk within our cultural currencies.

; Dissertation

Senses of Belonging: The Synaesthetics of Citizenship in American Literature, 1862 - 1903

Fretwell, Erica
Fonte: Universidade Duke Publicador: Universidade Duke
Tipo: Dissertação
Publicado em //2011
Relevância na Pesquisa
45.93%

In American letters, the Civil War represented a decisive break in literary form, a shift from interiority to exteriority. Sentimentalism harnessed the transformative effects of aesthetic feeling to galvanize political opinion in antebellum America, whereas realist and regionalist writing's empiricist attention to surface and appearance represented a reaction against sentimentalism. Yet postbellum literature is nothing if not a sustained meditation on how the feeling, sensate body negotiates the abstraction of citizenship and political life.

The paradoxes presented by black emancipation, immigration, and women's suffrage forced what today we consider the period's most canonical authors, from Emily Dickinson to W.E.B. Du Bois, to confront the contradictory feelings provoked by a democratic nation that excluded most of its citizens from their fundamental rights. The taste of Ellis Island, Henry James warned in The American Scene, "will be forever in [the] mouth" of the citizen, who must share "the intimacy of his American patriotism with the inconceivable alien." James's literal distaste for immigrants raises the stakes of what it means to locate the experience of belonging neither inside nor outside the body, but at its sensory orifices...

Anthropomorphic Attachments in U.S. Literature, Robotics, and Artificial Intelligence

Rhee, Jennifer
Fonte: Universidade Duke Publicador: Universidade Duke
Tipo: Dissertação Formato: 10074214 bytes; application/pdf
Publicado em //2010 EN_US
Relevância na Pesquisa
45.71%

"Anthropomorphic Attachments" undertakes an examination of the human as a highly nebulous, fluid, multiple, and often contradictory concept, one that cannot be approached directly or in isolation, but only in its constitutive relationality with the world. Rather than trying to find a way outside of the dualism between human and not-human, I take up the concept of anthropomorphization as a way to hypersaturate the question of the human. Within this hypersaturated field of inquiry, I focus on the specific anthropomorphic relationalities between human and humanoid technology. Focusing primarily on contemporary U.S. technologies and cultural forms, my dissertation looks at artificial intelligence and robotics in conversation with their cultural imaginaries in contemporary literature, science fiction, film, performance art, and video games, and in conversation with contemporary philosophies of the human, the posthuman, and technology. In reading these discourses as shaping, informing, and amplifying each other and the multiple conceptions of the human they articulate, "Anthropomorphic Attachments" attends to these multiple humans and the multiple morphologies by which anthropomorphic relationalities imagine and inscribe both humanoid technologies and the human itself.

; Dissertation

Network Aesthetics: American Fictions in the Culture of Interconnection

Jagoda, Patrick
Fonte: Universidade Duke Publicador: Universidade Duke
Tipo: Dissertação Formato: 2117642 bytes; application/pdf
Publicado em //2010 EN_US
Relevância na Pesquisa
45.9%

Following World War II, the network emerged as both a major material structure and one of the most ubiquitous metaphors of the globalizing world. Over subsequent decades, scientists and social scientists increasingly applied the language of interconnection to such diverse collective forms as computer webs, terrorist networks, economic systems, and disease ecologies. The prehistory of network discourse can be traced back to descriptions of cellular formations in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries and the invention of the electrical telegraph in the nineteenth century. Even so, it was not until the 1940s that researchers and writers began to rely on a more generalized network vocabulary to reflect fledgling material modes of interlinked organization and construct a new postwar vision of the world.

Since the 1970s, the field of network science has given rise to an even wider range of research on complexity, self-organization, sustainability, group interactions, and systemic resilience. Scientists such as Albert-Laszlo Barabasi have studied network design and new media critics such as Alexander Galloway have addressed network ontology. This dissertation contends that to grasp the effects of networks on globalization...

Reading Democracy: Anthologies of African American Women's Writing and the Legacy of Black Feminist Criticism, 1970-1990

Peay, Aisha Dolores
Fonte: Universidade Duke Publicador: Universidade Duke
Tipo: Dissertação Formato: 1032146 bytes; application/pdf
Publicado em //2009 EN_US
Relevância na Pesquisa
45.79%

Taking as its pretext the contemporary moment of self-reflexive critique on the part of interdisciplinary programs like Women's Studies and American Studies, Reading Democracy historicizes a black feminist literary critical practice and movement that developed alongside black feminist activism beginning in the 1970s. This dissertation addresses the future direction of scholarship based in Women's Studies and African-American Studies by focusing on the institutionalized political effects of Women's Liberation and the black liberation movements: the canonization of black women's writing and the development of a black feminist critical practice. Tracing a variety of conceptions of black feminist criticism over the course of two decades, I argue that this critical tradition is virtually indefinable apart from its anthological framing and that its literary objects illustrate the radical democratic constitution of black women's political subjectivity.

The editors of such anthologies of African American women's writing and black feminist practice as Toni Cade Bambara's The Black Woman (1970), Mary Helen Washington's Black-Eyed Susans (1975), and Barbara Smith's Home Girls: A Black Feminist Anthology (1984) articulate the relationship of political praxis to creative enterprise and intellectual activity. In the case of Smith's anthology...

The Uses of Literature: Gilles Deleuze's American Rhizome

Koerner, Michelle Renae
Fonte: Universidade Duke Publicador: Universidade Duke
Tipo: Dissertação
Publicado em //2010
Relevância na Pesquisa
45.98%

"The Uses of Literature: Gilles Deleuze's American Rhizome" puts four writers - Walt Whitman, Herman Melville, George Jackson and William S. Burroughs - in conjunction with four concepts - becoming-democratic, belief in the world, the line of flight, and finally, control societies. The aim of this study is to elaborate and expand on Gilles Deleuze's extensive use of American literature and to examine possible conjunctions of his philosophy with contemporary American literary criticism and American Studies. I argue that Deleuze's interest in American writing not only productively complicates recent historical accounts of "French Theory's" incursion into American academia, but also provides a compelling way think about the relationship between literature and history, language and experience, and the categories of minor and major that organize national literary traditions. Beginning with the concept of the "American rhizome" this dissertation approaches the question of rhizomatic thought as a constructivist methodology for engaging the relationship between literary texts and broader social movements. Following an introduction laying out the basic coordinates of such an approach, and their historical relevance with respect to the reception of "French Theory" in the United States...

Postmarked Constellations: Historicity and Paraliterary Form in Late American Fictions

Jones, Keith Robert
Fonte: Universidade Duke Publicador: Universidade Duke
Tipo: Dissertação
Publicado em //2012
Relevância na Pesquisa
45.71%

"Postmarked Constellations" examines how three late-twentieth century American writers bring long historical processes into view through their use of paraliterary forms. The term paraliterary is used in this study to refer to a set of popular cultural forms that overlap the field of the "literary," thereby complicating the latter's assumed autonomy from the impurities of everyday life. Focusing upon the historical fictions of Gayl Jones's blues novel Corregidora (1975), Samuel R. Delany's sword and sorcery series Return to Nevèrÿon (1979-1987), Cormac McCarthy's Western novel Blood Meridian, or the Evening Redness in the West (1985), this dissertation argues that these writers strategically turn to the paraliterary in order to engage their own moment's historical crisis within a larger trajectory of Anglo-European Western expansionism within the Americas. In adopting the blues (Gayl Jones), sword and sorcery (Delany), and the Western (McCarthy), these writers do not merely incorporate elements of these cultural forms, but rather transform their codes and conventions in order to bring past historical experiences into contact with the present. In so doing these writers draw out the historical dimensions internal to each of these generic forms. They show the degree to which genres are embedded within a larger world system...

American Experiments: Science, Aesthetics, and Politics in Clinical Practices of Twentieth-Century American Literature

Andrews, Lindsey Catherine
Fonte: Universidade Duke Publicador: Universidade Duke
Tipo: Dissertação
Publicado em //2013
Relevância na Pesquisa
45.9%

This dissertation is concerned with the relationships between experiments in literature, science, and politics in twentieth-century United States culture. I argue that the three can be considered together by understanding "experimentation" as a set of processes rather than a method, and highlighting the centrality of writing and reading to experiments in all three arenas. Drawing on scientist Ludwik Fleck's concept of "valuable experiments," I read specific experiments in each field in conversation with the others, highlighting the ways in which science and politics require aesthetic structures, the ways in which science and literature reconfigure politics, and the ways in which politics and literature can intervene in and reconfigure scientific practices. Ultimately, I try to develop a reading practice that can make visible the shared transformative capacities of science, literature, and radical politics.

In the course of three chapters, I analyze the formal and conceptual innovations of writers such as William Burroughs, Ralph Ellison, and Carson McCullers, who were intimately affected by the uses of experimental science in corrective institutional practice. In doing so, I develop a concept of "experimental literature" that is distinct from avant-garde literature and can account for the investments that these writers share with scientists such as Albert Hofmann...

"The seed of the missionary spirit": foreign missions, print culture, and evangelical identity in the Early American Republic

Moreshead, Ashley E.
Fonte: University of Delaware Publicador: University of Delaware
Tipo: Tese de Doutorado
Relevância na Pesquisa
45.89%
Heyrman, Christine Leigh; Evangelical Protestants in the early American republic published pamphlets, memoirs, and periodicals as a way of identifying to each other and to the unevangelized world who they were and what it meant to be an evangelical, creating their own "print culture" as they tried to preserve the purity of their message while establishing a transformative presence in the world around them. Promoters of foreign missions created their own subset of evangelical literature that recruited volunteers and financial support for evangelical missions overseas. In their efforts to draw attention to the foreign missionary cause, producers of missionary literature tapped into different concerns that evangelicals shared as they navigated the evolving culture of the early republic, specifically in the Northeast, where most early leaders of the foreign missions movement were headquartered. They engaged several cultural processes--including the creation of national and denominational identity, the evolution of American masculinity, and the debates over women's roles in the early republic--and thus contributed their own perspectives to textual dialogues about the nature and evolution of American evangelical identity. This dissertation focuses on the creation and promotion of the first two American foreign missions organizations...