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A produção científica sobre imagens técnicas na Ciência da Informação

Costa, Juliana Peres da
Fonte: Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul Publicador: Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul
Tipo: Trabalho de Conclusão de Curso Formato: application/pdf
POR
Relevância na Pesquisa
45.54%
Busca levantar o estado da arte da produção científica sobre o tema imagens técnicas na área de Ciência da Informação (CI). Contextualiza: imagens técnicas, baseado em Arlindo Machado, Vilém Flusser, Philippe Dubois, André Parente; e produção científica, baseado em Le Coadic, Tefko Saracevic, Leilah Bufrem. Compreende os seguintes objetivos específicos: identificar os autores que publicam sobre o tema e as instituições às quais estão vinculados; diferenciar os níveis de formação dos referidos autores e suas áreas de formação; relacionar os periódicos científicos que publicam sobre o tema; discernir cronologicamente a produção bibliográfica; verificar quais os enfoques dados nas publicações sobre o tema. Utiliza uma metodologia mista – que inclui o estudo bibliométrico e a técnica de análise de conteúdo, criando-se categorias a posteriori – cujo contexto é a Base Referencial de Artigos de Periódicos em Ciência da Informação (BRAPCI), que indexa 24 revistas vigentes e 11 históricas. Examina os títulos, os resumos e as palavras-chaves dos artigos, utilizando-se de planilha gerada a partir dos resultados obtidos na busca, conforme os objetivos específicos do trabalho. Os dados são processados com a utilização de gráficos e tabelas e os resultados são analisados conforme cada um dos objetivos específicos. Conclui que: a produção científica sobre imagens técnicas na CI soma um total de 169 artigos...

Medicine in the Popular Press: The Influence of the Media on Perceptions of Disease

Young, Meredith E.; Norman, Geoffrey R.; Humphreys, Karin R.
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 29/10/2008 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
25.43%
In an age of increasing globalization and discussion of the possibility of global pandemics, increasing rates of reporting of these events may influence public perception of risk. The present studies investigate the impact of high levels of media reporting on the perceptions of disease. Undergraduate psychology and medical students were asked to rate the severity, future prevalence and disease status of both frequently reported diseases (e.g. avian flu) and infrequently reported diseases (e.g. yellow fever). Participants considered diseases that occur frequently in the media to be more serious, and have higher disease status than those that infrequently occur in the media, even when the low media frequency conditions were considered objectively ‘worse’ by a separate group of participants. Estimates of severity also positively correlated with popular print media frequency in both student populations. However, we also see that the concurrent presentation of objective information about the diseases can mitigate this effect. It is clear from these data that the media can bias our perceptions of disease.

Construct Validity and Factor Structure of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Epworth Sleepiness Scale in a Multi-National Study of African, South East Asian and South American College Students

Gelaye, Bizu; Lohsoonthorn, Vitool; Lertmeharit, Somrat; Pensuksan, Wipawan C.; Sanchez, Sixto E.; Lemma, Seblewengel; Berhane, Yemane; Zhu, Xiaotong; Vélez, Juan Carlos; Barbosa, Clarita; Anderade, Asterio; Tadesse, Mahlet G.; Williams, Michelle A.
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN_US
Relevância na Pesquisa
45.42%
Background: The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) are questionnaires used to assess sleep quality and excessive daytime sleepiness in clinical and population-based studies. The present study aimed to evaluate the construct validity and factor structure of the PSQI and ESS questionnaires among young adults in four countries (Chile, Ethiopia, Peru and Thailand). Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 8,481 undergraduate students. Students were invited to complete a self-administered questionnaire that collected information about lifestyle, demographic, and sleep characteristics. In each country, the construct validity and factorial structures of PSQI and ESS questionnaires were tested through exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses (EFA and CFA). Results: The largest component-total correlation coefficient for sleep quality as assessed using PSQI was noted in Chile (r = 0.71) while the smallest component-total correlation coefficient was noted for sleep medication use in Peru (r = 0.28). The largest component-total correlation coefficient for excessive daytime sleepiness as assessed using ESS was found for item 1 (sitting/reading) in Chile (r = 0.65) while the lowest item-total correlation was observed for item 6 (sitting and talking to someone) in Thailand (r = 0.35). Using both EFA and CFA a two-factor model was found for PSQI questionnaire in Chile...

Information studies for the business sector in Spanish universities

Mu??oz-Ca??avate, Antonio; H??pola, Pedro
Fonte: Universidade de Granada Publicador: Universidade de Granada
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
ENG
Relevância na Pesquisa
65.55%
The management of information in the business world constitutes a single consolidated area within undergraduate and graduate study programs in Librarianship and Information Science. This article describes information studies for the business sector within Spain, including the university programs known as Diplomatura in Librarianship and Documentation (equivalent to a three-year first cycle in Library and Information Science), and Licenciatura in Documentation (a two-year second cycle). It also presents the contradictions that are found between the professional implications of the information society paradigm, on the one hand, and the academic strategies of the discipline in Spain, which are largely trapped in a traditional framework.

Qualidade da informação em saúde mediada pelas bibliotecas universitárias no Brasil e na Alemanha

Alentejo, Eduardo da Silva
Fonte: Universidade de Brasília Publicador: Universidade de Brasília
Tipo: Tese
POR
Relevância na Pesquisa
25.58%
Tese (doutorado)—Universidade de Brasília, Faculdade de Ciência da Informação, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciência da Informação. 2013.; Esta pesquisa qualitativa e quantitativa investiga o tema da qualidade da informação em saúde mediada por bibliotecas universitárias. Sob o paradigma social da Ciência da Informação, considera o ciclo de informações de produção, organização, mediação, acesso e uso de informações em saúde em três dimensões sociais: geral, particular e interna no contexto de uso da informação em saúde. A partir da revisão da literatura, explica que a qualidade da informação em saúde mediada por bibliotecas universitárias é um produto orientado pela gestão da qualidade em bibliotecas. Através de pesquisa de campo em ambientes acadêmicos no Brasil e na Alemanha, bibliotecas do sistema da Universidade de Medicina de São Paulo, e na Biblioteca da Universidade de Justus Liebig-Universität, respectivamente, visa avaliar a qualidade da informação em saúde mediada pela biblioteca universitária. Após a aplicação do método "sistema de informações sobre a qualidade", adaptado a partir de metodologia de Gestão de Serviço, considera-se: a percepção dos usuários em relação à aplicação das informações obtidas na biblioteca...

The Annotated Bibliography and Citation Behavior: Enhancing Student Scholarship in an Undergraduate Biology Course

Flaspohler, Molly R.; Rux, Erika M.; Flaspohler, John A.
Fonte: American Society for Cell Biology Publicador: American Society for Cell Biology
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2007 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
55.62%
Contemporary undergraduates in the biological sciences have unprecedented access to scientific information. Although many of these students may be savvy technologists, studies from the field of library and information science consistently show that undergraduates often struggle to locate, evaluate, and use high-quality, reputable sources of information. This study demonstrates the efficacy and pedagogical value of a collaborative teaching approach designed to enhance information literacy competencies among undergraduate biology majors who must write a formal scientific research paper. We rely on the triangulation of assessment data to determine the effectiveness of a substantial research paper project completed by students enrolled in an upper-level biology course. After enhancing library-based instruction, adding an annotated bibliography requirement, and using multiple assessment techniques, we show fundamental improvements in students' library research abilities. Ultimately, these improvements make it possible for students to more independently and effectively complete this challenging science-based writing assignment. We document critical information literacy advances in several key areas: student source-type use, annotated bibliography enhancement...

A new curriculum for information literacy: curriculum and supporting documents

Secker, Jane; Coonan, Emma
Fonte: Cambridge University Library Publicador: Cambridge University Library
Tipo: Monograph; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 09/07/2011 EN; EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
65.62%
Information literacy can be defined as a set of skills, attributes and behaviour that underpins student learning in the digital age. It has been linked to graduate employability and increasingly UK universities are developing information literacy strategies to inform how they ensure students acquire these competencies during their undergraduate studies. Information literacy programmes or sessions are often run by academic libraries; however, in order to be most effective, experts recognise that information literacy should be embedded within a subject curriculum and ideally taught in partnership with academic and academic support colleagues, rather than in one-off sessions run by librarians. SCONUL's Seven Pillars of Information Literacy model, widely accepted in higher education, sets out the skills and attributes that an information literate person should have. In practical terms, however, how information literacy is taught varies widely across higher education. In addition, recent research suggests that the information-seeking behaviour and needs of students are changing (CIBER, 2008), largely driven by the changing experiences and expectations of 'the Google Generation' who have grown up with access to the internet being the norm. While the Google Generation and 'Digital Native' terms have been debated and widely criticised (Jones...

A new curriculum for information literacy: expert consultation report

Secker, Jane
Fonte: Cambridge University Library Publicador: Cambridge University Library
Tipo: Monograph; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 08/07/2011 EN; EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
65.62%
Information literacy can be defined as a set of skills, attributes and behaviour that underpins student learning in the digital age. It has been linked to graduate employability and increasingly UK universities are developing information literacy strategies to inform how they ensure students acquire these competencies during their undergraduate studies. Information literacy programmes or sessions are often run by academic libraries; however, in order to be most effective, experts recognise that information literacy should be embedded within a subject curriculum and ideally taught in partnership with academic and academic support colleagues, rather than in one-off sessions run by librarians. SCONUL's Seven Pillars of Information Literacy model, widely accepted in higher education, sets out the skills and attributes that an information literate person should have. In practical terms, however, how information literacy is taught varies widely across higher education. In addition, recent research suggests that the information-seeking behaviour and needs of students are changing (CIBER, 2008), largely driven by the changing experiences and expectations of 'the Google Generation' who have grown up with access to the internet being the norm. While the Google Generation and 'Digital Native' terms have been debated and widely criticised (Jones...

A new curriculum for information literacy: executive summary

Secker, Jane; Coonan, Emma
Fonte: Cambridge University Library Publicador: Cambridge University Library
Tipo: Monograph; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 08/07/2011 EN; EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
65.62%
Information literacy can be defined as a set of skills, attributes and behaviour that underpins student learning in the digital age. It has been linked to graduate employability and increasingly UK universities are developing information literacy strategies to inform how they ensure students acquire these competencies during their undergraduate studies. Information literacy programmes or sessions are often run by academic libraries; however, in order to be most effective, experts recognise that information literacy should be embedded within a subject curriculum and ideally taught in partnership with academic and academic support colleagues, rather than in one-off sessions run by librarians. SCONUL's Seven Pillars of Information Literacy model, widely accepted in higher education, sets out the skills and attributes that an information literate person should have. In practical terms, however, how information literacy is taught varies widely across higher education. In addition, recent research suggests that the information-seeking behaviour and needs of students are changing (CIBER, 2008), largely driven by the changing experiences and expectations of 'the Google Generation' who have grown up with access to the internet being the norm. While the Google Generation and 'Digital Native' terms have been debated and widely criticised (Jones...

Brazilian Model of Library and Information Studies in the Bachelor's level

Zins, Chaim; Santos, Plácida L. V. Amorim da Costa
Fonte: UFPB Publicador: UFPB
Tipo: info:eu-repo/semantics/article; info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion; Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 28/12/2015 ENG
Relevância na Pesquisa
135.69%
The article is aimed to improve the academic education in the field of library and information science in Brazil by structuring the curricular reasoning that shapes the contents of undergraduate academic programs. It is the second article of a group of two articles that resulted from a study conducted in Brazil in 2011– 2014. The first article presents a universal model1 of LIS programs (ZINS; SANTOS, 2015, in press). This article presents the Brazilian model2. This part of the research was composed of two methodological phases. The first phase was a systematic Critical Delphi study with 21 leading information science scholars from Brazil. The second phase was an unsystematic formative evaluation of the content categories. The evaluation was based on a Grounded theory study of 13 academic programs in Brazil. The study resulted in a model2 that sets the guiding principles for developing undergraduate programs in Brazil. The model is actually composed of two complementary models; a systematic four step developing process (model2.1) and a structured plan of 288 content categories (model2.2). The study improves the development and evaluation of LIS programs in Brazil by providing a structured model for content selection. The study stresses the key role of the curricular reasoning for improving LIS education in Brazil; a curricular reasoning that is grounded in the Brazilian milieu.