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Patient education--the forgotten link in managing osteoporosis

Laslett, L.; McNeil, J.; Lynch, J.
Fonte: Royal Australian College of General Practitioners Publicador: Royal Australian College of General Practitioners
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2004 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
55.72%
BACKGROUND: Osteoporosis and bone fractures are common, yet osteoporosis is under diagnosed in Australian settings. Osteoporosis can now be reliably diagnosed, and safely and effectively treated, but patient education strategies are under utilised. OBJECTIVE: This article discusses the role of education in osteoporosis risk reduction and management. DISCUSSION: Osteoporosis education initiatives such as the Osteoporosis Prevention and Self Management Course can increase knowledge, self efficacy and health related behaviours such as calcium intake and exercise over the short to medium term.; Laura L. Laslett, Julian D. O'Neil and Joan Lynch; Copyright © 2004 Royal Australian College of General Practitioners Copyright to Australian Family Physician. Reproduced with permission. Permission to reproduce must be sought from the publisher, The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners.

General practice registrars and research - Attitudes toward participation

Franke, L.; Kommers, T; van Weel-Baumgarten, E.M.; Lucasson, P.; Beek, M.M.L; Van Den Hoogen, H.; Van Weel, Chris
Fonte: Royal Australian College of General Practioners Publicador: Royal Australian College of General Practioners
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
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55.67%
Background: Early exposure of general practitioners to research is recommended to increase family medicine research capacity. However, vocational training programs encounter difficulties in engaging general practice registrars in research projects. The authors investigated registrars' opinions of research and their participation in research in daily practice. Methods: Sixty-seven Dutch general practice registrars participated in a trial concerning patients with emotional symptoms. The authors assessed the registrars' participation and opinions through observation and a questionnaire. Results: Response rate was 82%. Registrars recruited 208 patients. The participants liked learning a new skill and participating in research. Obligatory participation, lack of time and difficulties with patient recruitment were important barriers to participation. Discussion: Registrars report that participation in research during vocational training is interesting but that it should not be compulsory, and that they prefer to choose their own research subjects. The authors recommend implementing an attractive research program during vocational training.

Public education for the minority, private education for the majority

Levy, Gilat
Fonte: Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, London School of Economics and Political Science Publicador: Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, London School of Economics and Political Science
Tipo: Monograph; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /03/2004 EN; EN
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55.65%
Public provision of private goods such as education is usually viewed as a form of redistribution in kind. However, does it arise when income redistribution is feasible as well? In this paper I analyse a two-dimensional model of political decision making. Society has to choose both the tax rate and the allocation of the revenues between income redistribution and public provision of education. The political process that I analyse involves endogenous parties. Parties have a unique role in the model; I assume that parties increase the commitment ability of politicians and, as a result, increase the ability of different groups in society to compromise with one another. I find that public provision of education arises as an anti-majoritarian outcome; public provision of education arises only when those who benefit from education, e.g., voters with children, are a minority. The reason is that when education is consumed only by a minority, such redistribution in kind is 'cheap' relative to universal income redistribution, i.e., it can be effectively provided even with low taxes. Public provision of education arises then as a political compromise offered by the party of the poor who benefit from education and the rich voters who prefer low taxes. Thus...

Educational effects of widening access to the academic track: a natural experiment

Machin, Erin; McNally, Sandra
Fonte: Centre for Economics of Education, London School of Economics and Political Science Publicador: Centre for Economics of Education, London School of Economics and Political Science
Tipo: Monograph; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /08/2007 EN; EN
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55.7%
It is difficult to know whether widening access to schools which provide a more academically-orientated, general education makes a difference to average educational achievement. Although, there has been a shift in this direction in many OECD countries, reforms have been difficult to evaluate because they are often accompanied by other important changes to the educational system or because they have been introduced at the same time across regions. However, the consequences of such reform are deeply controversial and very much a current policy issue. In particular, contenders argue that an increase in access to the ‘academic’ track harms the quality of education for everyone (through contextual effects) without improving the prospects of those enabled to attend the more academic track. In this paper, we make use of a unique natural experiment to identify the net effect of widening access to schools which provide a more academically-orientated, general education on overall education outcomes. The reform consists of widening access to the more academic track within one specific province (Northern Ireland) at a particular point in time. This is the only differential change that happens across the regions considered – England and Northern Ireland – which otherwise have a similar curriculum with the same national examination for students at age 16 and 18. The reform enabled a very significant increase in the number of Northern Irish pupils who could attend the more academic track (‘grammar schools’) at the end of primary school...

Resources and standards in urban schools

Machin, Stephen; McNally, Sandra; Meghir, Costas
Fonte: Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics and Political Science Publicador: Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics and Political Science
Tipo: Monograph; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /02/2007 EN; EN
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55.66%
Do resources matter? This question remains controversial in the economics of education as many studies find no relationship between school resources and educational outcomes. Yet, improving educational performance, especially of ‘hard to reach’ children, is a key area for government policy. This is particularly the case in countries like the UK and the US where the fact that many adults have poor basic skills is frequently attributed to people being ‘let down’ by the education system. In the UK, particular attention has been paid to schools in inner-city areas, where many pupils face problems of socio-economic deprivation and where there has been a concern about educational underachievement for many years. We study a flagship policy of the UK government – the Excellence in Cities (EiC) programme – which has been designed to address these problems. This enables us to consider not only whether this particular policy was successful, but also to contribute to the more general debate as to whether resources matter and in what circumstances. We look at the distributional impacts of resources in a way that is not addressed by much of the existing literature. Excellence in Cities was launched in 1999 in over 400 secondary schools in England and since then progressively increased in coverage. It is now implemented in about a third of all secondary schools (over 1...

Vive la revolution! Long term returns of 1968 to the angry students

Maurin, Eric; McNally, Sandra
Fonte: Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics and Political Science Publicador: Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics and Political Science
Tipo: Monograph; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /06/2005 EN; EN
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55.71%
The student revolt of May 1968 led to chaos across France, temporarily shaking the economic and political establishment. The crisis was unanticipated, unpredictable and short-lived. The famous events coincided with the period in which examinations are undertaken. In the university context, exams became a central aspect of the bargaining process between students and the authorities with the former successfully bargaining for ‘light-touch’ exams ‘to avoid harming students who have spent a lot of time struggling for a better university’. The general chaos and student lobbying led to the abandonment of normal exam procedures throughout the higher education system. For example, the important examination taken for the baccalauréat (success at which guarantees entry to university) only involved oral tests. As a result, the pass rate for various qualifications increased enormously in that one year. We show that the lowering of thresholds had important consequences for students at an early (and highly selective) stage of the higher education system. The events enabled a significant proportion of students born between 1947 and 1950 (particularly in 1948 and 1949) to pursue more years of higher education than would otherwise have been possible. We compare outcomes for cohorts affected by the relaxation of the examinations with cohorts that were too young or too old at this time. There is a wage premium of 2-3 per cent for the most affected cohorts and an increased probability of achieving a high-status occupational position. We also show that persons from a middle-class family background were more likely to be among the ‘marginal students’...

Without a greater focus on education, the government’s strategy of transferring more power to cities may struggle to deliver growth

Leunig, Tim
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 09/12/2011 EN; EN
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55.64%
Only 1 of the 8 largest places outside London has an income above the national average, something the government’s new urban growth strategy aims to address. Tim Leunig argues that while the new strategy of transferring more powers from Westminster to cities is sound in principle, more still needs to be done at local level to ensure that cities deliver the best possible education for students, to build more highly skilled, resilient communities.

Higher education academic salaries in the UK

Collins, Mark; Vignoles, Anna; Walker, James
Fonte: Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics and Political Science Publicador: Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics and Political Science
Tipo: Monograph; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /05/2007 EN; EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
65.61%
The recent industrial action taken by the Association of University Teachers (AUT) has given the issue of academic pay high prominence in the UK press. There appears to be a remarkable consensus that higher education academic salaries are too low, relative to other groups of workers in the UK, and that this is leading to an academic ‘brain drain’. There is concern that this in turn will result in lower quality higher education, as universities fail to attract the ‘brightest and the best’. To rise above the rhetoric, there is a pressing need for robust evidence on relative academic salaries. In this paper, we compare the salaries of Higher Education teaching professionals in the United Kingdom with those of other comparable professionals. We offer evidence on relative salaries in HE academia over the last decade or so and we compare academic salaries to a range of different comparator groups, including some specific occupational groupings that one might view as more similar, in terms of unobserved characteristics, to academics. We then consider the extent to which the gap between the earnings of HE academics and that of other occupations is attributable to differences in the characteristics of academics, for example the fact that they are more highly educated on average...

Sheepskin or prozac: the causal effect of education on mental health

Chevalier, Arnaud; Feinstein, Leon
Fonte: Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics and Political Science Publicador: Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics and Political Science
Tipo: Monograph; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /08/2006 EN; EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
65.64%
Mental illness is associated with large costs to individuals and society. Education improves various health outcomes but little work has been done on mental illness. To obtain unbiased estimates of the effect of education on mental health, we rely on a rich longitudinal dataset that contains health information from childhood to adulthood and thus allow us to control for fixed effects in mental health. We measure two health outcomes: malaise score and depression and estimate the extensive and intensive margins of education on mental health using various estimators. For all estimators, accounting for the endogeneity of education augments its protecting effect on mental health. We find that the effect of education is greater at mid-level of qualifications, for women and for individuals at greater risk of mental illness. The effects of education are observed at all ages, additionally education also reduces the transition to depression. These results suggest substantial returns to education in term of improved mental health.

The more the merrier? The effect of family size and birth order on children's education

Black, Sandra; Devereux, Paul; Salvanes, Kjell
Fonte: Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics and Political Science Publicador: Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics and Political Science
Tipo: Monograph; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /06/2005 EN; EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
65.6%
There is an extensive theoretical literature that postulates a trade off between child quantity and quality within a family. However, there is little causal evidence that speaks to this theory. Using a rich dataset on the entire population of Norway over an extended period of time, we examine the effects of family size and birth order on the educational attainment of children. While we find a negative correlation between family size and children's education, when we include indicators for birth order and/or use twin births as an instrument, family size effects become negligible. In addition, birth order has a significant and large negative effect on children's education. We also study adult earnings, employment, and teenage childbearing, and find strong evidence for birth order effects with these outcomes, particularly among women. These findings suggest the need to revisit economic models of fertility and child 'production', focusing not only on differences across families but differences within families as well.

Changes in intergenerational mobility in Britain

Blanden, Jo; Goodman, Alissa; Gregg, Paul; Machin, Stephen
Fonte: Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics and Political Science Publicador: Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics and Political Science
Tipo: Monograph; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /06/2002 EN; EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
55.66%
This paper flatly contradicts the common view that anyone can make it in modern Britain. Indeed, rather then weakening, the link between an individual's earnings and those of his or her parents has strengthened. An important part of the explanation is that the expansion of higher education has benefited people from rich families much more than those from poor families. The extent of intergenerational mobility is frequently seen as a measure of the degree of equality of opportunity in society and considerable research has been devoted to obtaining an accurate estimate of it for a number of countries. However little is known about how these connections have altered through time. Sharp increases in educational attainment and rises in earnings (and living standards in general) in more recent generations mean that many observers seem to think that we now live in a more mobile, meritocratic society than in the past. Contrary to this, this research seems to show that where you come from matters more now than in the past. It appears that the extent of intergenerational mobility has actually fallen. The research uses unique data that follow two cohorts of children (one born in 1958, one born in 1970) through childhood and into adulthood. The latest data...

The effect of a social experiment in education

Meghir, Costas; Palme, Marten
Fonte: Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics and Political Science Publicador: Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics and Political Science
Tipo: Monograph; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /05/2001 EN; EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
65.61%
The impact of compulsory schooling laws as well as the abolition of early selection by ability remain important issues in the educational debate. These issues were the focus of a major education reform in Sweden which was implemented in the 60s. The reform was preceded by a “social experiment" in which only a proportion of municipalities received the new school system. We use survey data linked with tax records covering 10% of one of the cohorts who were educated during the experimental period, to evaluate the impact of the reform on educational attainment and earnings. We find significant increases in the educational attainment of individuals from poorer backgrounds. We also find that the largest impact on earnings was for higher ability individuals from poorer backgrounds. In addition we estimate the returns to education for those affected by the reform. By exploiting the differential impact of the reform by county we are able, in some cases, to distinguish its direct effect on earnings from the effect it had by increasing the quantity of education. We find that the main source of increased earnings came from increasing educational attainment.

The impact of the law on industrial disputes in the 1980s: report of a survey of education authorities

Elgar, J.; Simpson, R.
Fonte: Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics and Political Sciences Publicador: Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics and Political Sciences
Tipo: Monograph; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /05/1994 EN; EN
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55.66%
This paper reports the results of one part of a research project designed to investigate the nature and extent of the impact of the labour legislation enacted between 1980 and 1990 on the conduct of industrial relations and the processes by which this has come about. Interviews were carried out with officers in the education departments of ten Local Education Authorities. All had felt the impact of major national disputes from the mid-1980s to early 1990s. The most important legacy of this experience so far as the law was concerned was that it had now become generally the case that any significant industrial action would lead to Authorities considering whether to make deductions from the pay of workers concerned. Modification to the structure for the provision of public sector education under the Education Acts of the late 1980s and early 1990s was a far more important legal influence. This required significant change in established industrial relations and employment practices and could be a cause of dispute to which the labour legislation of the 1980s was of limited relevance.

Making citizenship education work: European and Greek perspectives

Chryssochoou, Dimitris N.
Fonte: Hellenic Observatory, London School of Economics and Political Science Publicador: Hellenic Observatory, London School of Economics and Political Science
Tipo: Monograph; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /09/2009 EN; EN
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This paper employs a civic learning approach to discussing recent developments in citizenship education through an analysis of contemporary democratic thinking. By reviving Europe’s great democratic tradition in the sense of a liberal republicanist understanding of citizenship, it argues the case for the transformation of democratic norms into policy structures, educational initiatives and school curricula. Central to the analysis is the Council of Europe’s EDCHRE programme and the lessons to be drawn from this uniquely observed pan-European project that equips young people to participate actively in society and in daily school life. The paper makes an effort to present and evaluate various aspects of the Greek school curriculum that are relevant to the study. The general conclusion to be drawn is that citizenship education relates to the search for a ‘democracy of ideas’ in Pettit’s sense of the term that can link together two different incentives of civic learning: on the one hand, the notion of a participatory ethos at the traditional state level and, on the other, the practice of active citizenship alongside and even beyond that level.

Committed mothers and well-adjusted children: privatisation, early-years education and motherhood in Calcutta

Donner, Henrike
Fonte: Cambridge University Press Publicador: Cambridge University Press
Tipo: Article; PeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em //2006 EN; EN
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55.65%
This article explores new definitions of good mothering amongmiddleclass families in Calcutta and the way early years education, which has become popular over the last two decades has reshaped women’s lives as daughters-in-law and mothers of successful future white-collar workers. Through a detailed ethnography of mothers attitudes to preschool education and the parenting practices associated with it the article explores their roles as consumers within a highly competitive local educational landscape, and argues that it is in through preschool education and the related practises that these women actively shape discourses of politics and modernity.

LSE centre for economic performance: evaluating education policies: the evidence from economic research

McNally, Sandra
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 13/04/2010 EN; EN
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55.66%
A new series of Election Analyses is now available from the LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance (CEP). The series will discuss the research evidence on some of the key policy battlegrounds of the 2010 General Election, including macroeconomic policy, immigration, health, education, crime, poverty and inequality, labour market policy, regional policy, energy and the environment, financial regulation and bankers’ bonuses, and foreign aid.The latest CEP Election Analysis gives an overview of the research evidence on education policy, one of the key battlegrounds of the 2010 General Election.

Developments in education in Palanpur, a village in Uttar Pradesh

Kattumuri, Ruth; Tiwari, Dinesh Kumar
Fonte: Asia Research Centre, London School of Economics and Political Science Publicador: Asia Research Centre, London School of Economics and Political Science
Tipo: Monograph; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em //2011 EN; EN
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55.67%
This paper examines developments in literacy and education in Palanpur. We consider schooling facilities and other related services available in this village and its neighbourhood. Schooling levels are analysed in the context of gender and social groups. Some obstacles for children and young people attempting to pursue education are discussed. Education levels and services are considerably lower than that of Moradabad district and Uttar Pradesh state averages. However there is evidence of major improvements in education in the last decade. In particular, the progress in education of girls and across social groups since the last Palanpur study in 1993 is noteworthy. The infrastructure, availability of teachers and other services in the school have also improved.

Education policy and governance in England under the Coalition Government (2010-15): academies, the pupil premium and free early education

West, Anne
Fonte: Institute of Education Press (IOE Press) Publicador: Institute of Education Press (IOE Press)
Tipo: Article; PeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em //2015 EN; EN
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65.62%
This paper explores the governance of school-based and early education in England under the Conservative-Liberal Democrat Coalition Government (2010-15). Drawing on three prominent Coalition policy areas – the academies programme, the pupil premium and free part-time early education – the paper focuses on changes to the role played by central government in governance; it also makes contrasts with Wales and Scotland. An analysis of the funding and regulatory framework reveals that the role of central government in England increased under the Coalition Government and that of local government declined. These changes to governance have served to centralise power on the one hand and to facilitate and sustain markets in school-based and free early education on the other; the same cannot be said of governance in either Scotland or Wales, where democratically elected local government continues to play a highly significant role.

Book review: Who’s asking? Native science, western science and science education by Douglas L. Medin and Megan Bang

Jarvis, Rebecca
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 11/06/2014 EN; EN
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55.67%
With ‘Respecting Indigenous and Traditional Knowledge and Culture’ announced as one of the key topics at the upcoming IUCN World Parks Conference, there is no better time to pick up a copy of "Who’s Asking?" by Douglas L. Medin and Megan Bang. The authors challenge stereotypes of science and culture, and demonstrate how community-based education programmes can enhance indigenous engagement and participation in science. The book examines how the answers to scientific questions depend on who’s asking, and argues that a greater diversity of scientists asking the questions will lead to better science for everyone. This thought-provoking book is highly recommended for anyone interested in knowledge, science, and scientific decision-making, writes Rebecca Jarvis.

Education, equity and social mobility: a summary of three research papers

Utting, David
Fonte: Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, The London School of Economics and Political Science Publicador: Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, The London School of Economics and Political Science
Tipo: Monograph; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /01/2014 EN; EN
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This paper summarises key themes and research findings from papers presented at an event hosted by CASE on 23rd January 2014: - Blanden, J. & Macmillan, L. (2014) Education and Intergenerational Mobility: Help or Hindrance? CASEpaper (forthcoming) - Chowdry, H., Crawford, C., Dearden, L., Goodman, A. & Vignoles, A. (2013) Widening participation in higher education: analysis using linked administrative data. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society (Series A), Vol. 176, Part 2, pp. 431-457. - Crawford, C. (2012) Socioeconomic gaps in HE participation: how have they changed over time? London: Institute for Fiscal Studies. - Whitty, G. & Anders, J. (2014) (How) did Labour narrow the achievement and participation gap? LLAKES Research Paper 46. London: Institute of Education.