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Differential gene expression and developmental competence in in vitro produced bovine embryos

Ripamonte, Paula; Mesquita, Ligia Garcia; Cortezzi, Sylvia Sanches; de Carvalho Balieiro, Julio Cesar; Fonseca Merighe, Giovana Krempel; Watanabe, Yeda Fumie; Caetano, Alexandre Rodrigues; Meirelles, Flavio Vieira
Fonte: CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS; NEW YORK Publicador: CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS; NEW YORK
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
ENG
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.13%
The embryonic developmental block occurs at the 8-cell stage in cattle and is characterized by a lengthening of the cell cycle and an increased number of embryos that stop development. The maternal-embryonic transition arises at the same stage resulting in the transcription of many genes. Gene expression studies during this stage may contribute to the understanding of the physiological mechanisms involved in the maternal-embryonic transition. Herein we identified genes differentially expressed between embryos with high or low developmental competence to reach the blastocyst stage using differential display PCR. Embryos were analysed according to developmental kinetics: fast cleavage embryos showing 8 cells at 48 h post insemination (hpi) with high potential of development (F8), and embryos with slow cleavage presenting 4 cells at 48 hpi (54) and 8 cells at 90 hpi (S8), both with reduced rates of development to blastocyst. The fluorescence DDPCR method was applied and allowed the recovery of 176 differentially expressed bands with similar proportion between high and low development potential groups (52% to F8 and 48% in S4 and S8 groups). A total of 27 isolated fragments were cloned and sequenced, confirming the expected primer sequences and allowing the identification of 27 gene transcripts. PI3KCA and ITM2B were chosen for relative quantification of mRNA using real-time PCR and showed a kinetic and a time-related pattern of expression respectively. The observed results suggest the existence of two different embryonic genome activation mechanisms: fast-developing embryos activate genes related to embryonic development...

Information Fluency for Undergraduate Biology Majors: Applications of Inquiry-based Learning in a Developmental Biology Course

Gehring, Kathleen M.; Eastman, Deborah A.
Fonte: American Society for Cell Biology Publicador: American Society for Cell Biology
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2008 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
56.02%
Many initiatives for the improvement of undergraduate science education call for inquiry-based learning that emphasizes investigative projects and reading of the primary literature. These approaches give students an understanding of science as a process and help them integrate content presented in courses. At the same time, general initiatives to promote information fluency are being promoted on many college and university campuses. Information fluency refers to discipline-specific processing of information, and it involves integration of gathered information with specific ideas to form logical conclusions. We have implemented the use of inquiry-based learning to enhance and study discipline-specific information fluency skills in an upper-level undergraduate Developmental Biology course. In this study, an information literacy tutorial and a set of linked assignments using primary literature analysis were integrated with two inquiry-based laboratory research projects. Quantitaitve analysis of student responses suggests that the abilities of students to identify and apply valid sources of information were enhanced. Qualitative assessment revealed a set of patterns by which students gather and apply information. Self-assessment responses indicated that students recognized the impact of the assignments on their abilities to gather and apply information and that they were more confident about these abilities for future biology courses and beyond.

Identification of Neuronal Nuclei (NeuN) as Fox-3, a New Member of the Fox-1 Gene Family of Splicing Factors*

Kim, Kee K.; Adelstein, Robert S.; Kawamoto, Sachiyo
Fonte: American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Publicador: American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
55.96%
NeuN (neuronal nuclei) is a neuron-specific nuclear protein which is identified by immunoreactivity with a monoclonal antibody, anti-NeuN. Anti-NeuN has been used widely as a reliable tool to detect most postmitotic neuronal cell types in neuroscience, developmental biology, and stem cell research fields as well as diagnostic histopathology. To date, however, the identity of its antigen, NeuN itself, has been unknown. Here, we identify NeuN as the Fox-3 gene product by providing the following evidence: 1) Mass spectrometry analysis of anti-NeuN immunoreactive protein yields the Fox-3 amino acid sequence. 2) Recombinant Fox-3 is recognized by anti-NeuN. 3) Short hairpin RNAs targeting Fox-3 mRNA down-regulate NeuN expression. 4) Fox-3 expression is restricted to neural tissues. 5) Anti-Fox-3 immunostaining and anti-NeuN immunostaining overlap completely in neuronal nuclei. We also show that a protein cross-reactive with anti-NeuN is the synaptic vesicle protein, synapsin I. Anti-NeuN recognizes synapsin I in immunoblots with one order of magnitude lower affinity than Fox-3, and does not recognize synapsin I using immunohistology. Fox-3 (also called hexaribonucleotide-binding protein 3 and D11Bwg0517e) contains an RNA recognition motif and is classified as a member of the Fox-1 gene family that binds specifically to an RNA element...

Developmental Arrest of Caenorhabditis elegans BRAP-2 Mutant Exposed to Oxidative Stress Is Dependent on BRC-1*

Koon, Janet C.; Kubiseski, Terrance J.
Fonte: American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Publicador: American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
56.02%
Oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species is believed to be a contributor to the development of cancer and the physiological deterioration associated with aging. In this report, we describe the effect of reactive oxygen species exposure to a developing Caenorhabditis elegans organism containing a deletion in the homolog of BRCA1-associated protein 2 (BRAP-2). A mutant containing a deletion of brap-2 was highly sensitive to oxidizing conditions and demonstrated early larval arrest and lethality at low concentrations of the oxidative stress-inducing drug paraquat compared with the wild-type. This developmental arrest occurred early in the L1 stage and was dependent specifically on the function of the C. elegans ortholog of BRCA-1 tumor suppressor brc-1. We also show that developmental arrest in brap-2 mutants when exposed to oxidative stress was due to enhanced expression levels of the cell cycle inhibitor cki-1, and this increase in the expression levels of cki-1 requires brc-1 in brap-2 mutant animals. Our findings demonstrate that BRAP-2 is necessary for preventing an inappropriate response to elevated levels of reactive oxygen species by countering premature activation of BRC-1 and CKI-1.

Michael Akam and the rise of evolutionary developmental biology

Stern, David L.; Dawes-Hoang, Rachel E.
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2010 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.19%
Michael Akam has been awarded the 2007 Kowalevsky medal for his many research accomplishments in the area of evolutionary developmental biology. We highlight three tributaries of Michael’s contribution to evolutionary developmental biology. First, he has made major contributions to our understanding of development of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Second, he has maintained a consistent focus on several key problems in evolutionary developmental biology, including the evolving role of Hox genes in arthropods and, more recently, the evolution of segmentation mechanisms. Third, Michael has written a series of influential reviews that have integrated progress in developmental biology into an evolutionary perspective. Michael has also made a large impact on the field through his effective mentorship style, his selfless promotion of younger colleagues, and his leadership of the University Museum of Zoology at Cambridge and the European community of evolutionary developmental biologists.

Monoamine Oxidase A Expression Is Vital for Embryonic Brain Development by Modulating Developmental Apoptosis*

Wang, Chi Chiu; Borchert, Astrid; Ugun-Klusek, Aslihan; Tang, Ling Yin; Lui, Wai Ting; Chu, Ching Yan; Billett, Ellen; Kuhn, Hartmut; Ufer, Christoph
Fonte: American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Publicador: American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
56.05%
Monoamine oxidases (MAO-A, MAO-B) metabolize biogenic amines and have been implicated in neuronal apoptosis. Although apoptosis is an important process in embryo development, the role of MAO isoenzymes has not been investigated in detail. We found that expression of MAO-A and MAO-B can be detected early on during embryo development. Expression levels remained constant until around midgestation but then dropped to almost undetectable levels toward birth. Similar expression kinetics were observed in the brain. Isoform-specific expression silencing of MAO-A mediated by siRNA during in vitro embryogenesis induced developmental defects, as indicated by a reduction of the crown rump length and impaired cerebral development. These alterations were paralleled by elevated serotonin levels. Similar abnormalities were observed when embryos were cultured in the presence of the MAO-A inhibitor clorgyline or when the transcriptional inhibitor of MAO-A expression R1 was overexpressed. In contrast, no such alterations were detected when expression of MAO-B was knocked down. To explore the underlying mechanisms for the developmental abnormalities in MAO-A knockdown embryos, we quantified the degree of developmental apoptosis in the developing brain. MAO-A knockdown reduced the number of apoptotic cells in the neuroepithelium...

Design of the Artificial Acellular Feeder Layer for the Efficient Propagation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells*

Nagaoka, Masato; Hagiwara, Yuko; Takemura, Keiko; Murakami, Yuta; Li, Jixuan; Duncan, Stephen A.; Akaike, Toshihiro
Fonte: American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Publicador: American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 26/09/2008 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
55.96%
Embryonic stem (ES) cells are pluripotent-undifferentiated cells that have a great interest for the investigation of developmental biology. Murine ES cells maintain their pluripotency by the supplementation of the leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). LIF is reported to act as a matrix-anchored form, and immobilized cytokines are useful to sustain their signaling on target cells. In this study, we used the immobilizable fusion protein composed of LIF and IgG-Fc region, which was used as a model of the matrix-anchored form of LIF to establish a novel system for ES cell culture and to investigate the effect of immobilized LIF on maintenance of ES cell pluripotency. Mouse ES cells maintained their undifferentiated state on the surface coated with LIF-Fc. Furthermore, when cultured on the co-immobilized surface with LIF-Fc and E-cadherin-Fc, mouse ES cells showed characteristic scattering morphologies without colony formation, and they could maintain their undifferentiated state and pluripotency without additional LIF supplementation. The activation of LIF signaling was sustained on the co-immobilized surface. These results indicate that immobilized LIF and E-cadherin can maintain mouse ES cells efficiently and that the immobilizable LIF-Fc fusion protein is useful for the investigation of signaling pathways of an immobilized form of LIF in the maintenance of ES cell pluripotency.

How insights from cardiovascular developmental biology have impacted the care of infants and children with congenital heart disease

Chin, Alvin J.; Saint-Jeannet, Jean-Pierre; Lo, Cecilia W.
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.11%
To illustrate the impact developmental biology and genetics have already had on the clinical management of the million infants born worldwide each year with CHD, we have chosen three stories which have had particular relevance for pediatric cardiologists, cardiothoracic surgeons, cardiac anesthesiologists, and cardiac nurses. First, we show how Margaret Kirby’s finding of the unexpected contribution of an ectodermal cell population – the cranial neural crest – to the aortic arch arteries and arterial pole of the embryonic avian heart provided a key impetus to the field of cardiovascular patterning. Recognition that a majority of patients affected by the neurocristopathy DiGeorge syndrome have a chromosome 22q11 deletion, have also spurred tremendous efforts to characterize the molecular mechanisms contributing to this pathology, assigning a major role to the transcription factor Tbx1. Second, synthesizing the work of the last two decades by many laboratories on a wide gamut of metazoans (invertebrates, tunicates, agnathans, teleosts, lungfish, amphibians, and amniotes), we review the >20 major modifications and additions to the ancient circulatory arrangement composed solely of a unicameral (one-chambered), contractile myocardial tube and a short proximal aorta. Two changes will be discussed in detail – the interposition of a second cardiac chamber in the circulation and the septation of the cardiac ventricle. By comparing the developmental genetic data of several model organisms...

Long-Term Retention of Knowledge and Critical Thinking Skills in Developmental Biology†

Darland, Diane C.; Carmichael, Jeffrey S.
Fonte: American Society of Microbiology Publicador: American Society of Microbiology
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 03/12/2012 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.11%
The primary goal of this project was to assess long-term retention of concepts and critical thinking skills in individuals who completed a Developmental Biology course. Undergraduates who had completed the course between 2006 and 2009 were recently contacted and asked to complete a professional goals survey and a multiple-choice developmental biology assessment test (DBAT) targeting four levels of learning. The DBAT was designed to assess students’ retention of knowledge and skills related to factual recall, concept application, data analysis, and experimental design. Performance of the 2006–2009 cohorts was compared to that of students enrolled in 2010 who completed the DBAT at the beginning and the end of the semester. Participants from the 2010 course showed significant learning gains based on pre- and posttest scores overall and for each of the four levels of learning. No significant difference in overall performance was observed for students grouped by year from 2006–2010. Participants from the 2006–2009 cohorts scored slightly, but significantly, higher on average if they enrolled in graduate or professional training. However, performance on individual question categories revealed no significant differences between those participants with and without postundergraduate training. Scores on exams and a primary literature critique assignment were correlated with DBAT scores and thus represent predictors of long-term retention of developmental biology knowledge and skills.

The EvoDevoCI: A Concept Inventory for Gauging Students’ Understanding of Evolutionary Developmental Biology

Perez, Kathryn E.; Hiatt, Anna; Davis, Gregory K.; Trujillo, Caleb; French, Donald P.; Terry, Mark; Price, Rebecca M.
Fonte: American Society for Cell Biology Publicador: American Society for Cell Biology
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2013 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
56.07%
The authors present the development and validation of the EvoDevoCI, a concept inventory for evolutionary developmental biology. This CI measures student understanding of six core evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo) concepts using four scenarios and 11 multiple-choice items, all inspired by authentic scientific examples. Distracters were designed to represent the common conceptual difficulties students have with each evo-devo concept.

The Comet Cometh: Evolving Developmental Systems

Jaeger, Johannes; Laubichler, Manfred; Callebaut, Werner
Fonte: Springer Netherlands Publicador: Springer Netherlands
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.22%
In a recent opinion piece, Denis Duboule has claimed that the increasing shift towards systems biology is driving evolutionary and developmental biology apart, and that a true reunification of these two disciplines within the framework of evolutionary developmental biology (EvoDevo) may easily take another 100 years. He identifies methodological, epistemological, and social differences as causes for this supposed separation. Our article provides a contrasting view. We argue that Duboule’s prediction is based on a one-sided understanding of systems biology as a science that is only interested in functional, not evolutionary, aspects of biological processes. Instead, we propose a research program for an evolutionary systems biology, which is based on local exploration of the configuration space in evolving developmental systems. We call this approach—which is based on reverse engineering, simulation, and mathematical analysis—the natural history of configuration space. We discuss a number of illustrative examples that demonstrate the past success of local exploration, as opposed to global mapping, in different biological contexts. We argue that this pragmatic mode of inquiry can be extended and applied to the mathematical analysis of the developmental repertoire and evolutionary potential of evolving developmental mechanisms and that evolutionary systems biology so conceived provides a pragmatic epistemological framework for the EvoDevo synthesis.

Mouse Models and the Evolutionary Developmental Biology of the Skull

Hallgrímsson, Benedikt; Lieberman, Daniel Eric
Fonte: Oxford University Press Publicador: Oxford University Press
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN_US
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.23%
Understanding development is relevant to understanding evolution because developmental processes structure the expression of phenotypic variation upon which natural selection acts. Advances in developmental biology are fueling a new synthesis of developmental and evolutionary biology, but it remains unclear how to use developmental information that largely derives from a few model organisms to test hypotheses about the evolutionary developmental biology of taxa such as humans and other primates that have not been or are not amenable to direct study through experimental developmental biology. In this article, we discuss how and when model organisms like mice are useful for studying the evolutionary developmental biology of even rather distantly related and morphologically different groups like primates. A productive approach is to focus on processes that are likely to play key roles in producing evolutionarily significant phenotypic variation across a large phylogenetic range. We illustrate this approach by applying the analysis of craniofacial variation in mouse mutant models to primate and human evolution.; Anthropology

7.013 Introductory Biology, Spring 2005; Introductory Biology

Sive, Hazel L.; Jacks, Tyler; Gardel, Claudette L.
Fonte: MIT - Massachusetts Institute of Technology Publicador: MIT - Massachusetts Institute of Technology
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EN-US
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56.09%
The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material. 7.014 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of human biology. Topics include genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, disease (infectious agents, inherited diseases and cancer), developmental biology, neurobiology and evolution.

“Do I Need to Know This for the Exam?” Using Popular Media, Inquiry-based Laboratories, and a Community of Scientific Practice to Motivate Students to Learn Developmental Biology

Madhuri, Marga; Broussard, Christine
Fonte: American Society for Cell Biology Publicador: American Society for Cell Biology
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2008 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
56.18%
One of the greatest challenges instructors face is getting students to connect with the subject in a manner that encourages them to learn. In this essay, we describe the redesign of our Developmental Biology course to foster a deeper connection between students and the field of developmental biology. In our approach, we created a community of scientific practice focused on the investigation of environmental impacts on embryonic development and informed by popular and scientific media, the students' own questions, and the instructor. Our goals were to engage students in meaningful ways with the material, to develop students' science process skills, and to enhance students' understanding of broad principles of developmental biology. Though significant challenges arose during implementation, assessments indicate using this approach to teach undergraduate developmental biology was successful.

Beyond Arabidopsis. Translational Biology Meets Evolutionary Developmental Biology

Irish, Vivian F.; Benfey, Philip N.
Fonte: American Society of Plant Biologists Publicador: American Society of Plant Biologists
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /06/2004 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
56.18%
Developmental processes shape plant morphologies, which constitute important adaptive traits selected for during evolution. Identifying the genes that act in developmental pathways and determining how they are modified during evolution is the focus of the field of evolutionary developmental biology, or evo-devo. Knowledge of genetic pathways in the plant model Arabidopsis serves as the starting point for investigating how the toolkit of developmental pathways has been used and reused to form different plant body plans. One productive approach is to identify genes in other species that are orthologous to genes known to control developmental pathways in Arabidopsis and then determine what changes have occurred in the protein coding sequence or in the gene's expression to produce an altered morphology. A second approach relies on natural variation among wild populations or crop plants. Natural variation can be exploited to identify quantitative trait loci that underlie important developmental traits and, thus, define those genes that are responsible for adaptive changes. The possibility of applying comparative genomics approaches to Arabidopsis and related species promises profound new insights into the interplay of evolution and development.

Inaugural meeting of the Pan-American Society for Evolutionary Developmental Biology report: the importance of diversity in a multidisciplinary field

Edgar, Allison; Chinga, Javiera
Fonte: BioMed Central Publicador: BioMed Central
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 09/12/2015 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.16%
We analyze the interdisciplinary state of evolutionary developmental biology based on the diversity of themes, taxa, levels of organization and scientists at the first meeting of the Pan-American Society for Evolutionary Developmental Biology (2015). We first highlight selected presentations representative of three themes: gene regulatory control, developmental patterning mechanisms, and ecological-evolutionary-developmental interactions. We summarize the questions, approaches, and taxonomic sampling of plant and animal research presented at the meeting. Finally, we synthesize themes from the meeting’s panel discussion and workshops on broadening participation, education, and the role of Evolutionary Developmental Biology in the scientific community and its ability to transcend and integrate fields of inquiry.

The mechanisms underlying convergent evolution in the plumage patterns of birds

Gluckman, Thanh-Lan
Fonte: Elsevier - Animal Behaviour; University of Cambridge; Department of Zoology Publicador: Elsevier - Animal Behaviour; University of Cambridge; Department of Zoology
Tipo: Thesis; doctoral; PhD
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.16%
This thesis is embargoed until 2017-01 for publication reasons; Convergent evolution is a central theme in biology. Birds are an ideal system to examine the mechanisms underlying convergent evolution. Although bird patterning is diverse, within-feather patterns have repeatedly converged on the same four types: mottled patterns, scales, bars and spots. Other avian patterns occur, e.g. stripes, but are rare. In my thesis I examine the four main mechanisms underlying convergent evolution in plumage patterns: evolutionary genetics, evolutionary development, natural selection for signaling and camouflage. Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) is a model system in developmental biology. Examining the developmental basis of pattern formation using molecular techniques, the dorsal patterning of embryonic quail is likely due to activation of the melanocortin-1 receptor, which is a highly conserved pathway in vertebrates. I examined whether a reaction-diffusion based theoretical model of pattern formation may predict developmental constraint in two groups that have different lifestyles and spectacular patterns: waterfowl (Anseriformes) and gamebirds (Galliformes). Tracing the evolutionary trajectory of pattern evolution with Bayesian comparative modeling there was evidence for developmental constraint in pattern evolution. Adaptive explanations may also result in convergence. Cuckoo-hawk mimicry has been demonstrated in the common cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) and the Eurasian sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus)...

Development of Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography for Applications in Developmental Biology

Davis, Anjul M.
Fonte: Universidade Duke Publicador: Universidade Duke
Tipo: Dissertação Formato: 5667252 bytes; application/pdf
Publicado em 05/06/2008 EN_US
Relevância na Pesquisa
66.14%

Developmental biology is a field in which explorations are made to answer how an organism transforms from a single cell to a complex system made up of trillions of highly organized and highly specified cells. This field, however, is not just for discovery, it is crucial for unlocking factors that lead to diseases, defects, or malformations. The one key ingredient that contributes to the success of studies in developmental biology is the technology that is available for use. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is one such technology. OCT fills a niche between the high resolution of confocal microscopy and deep imaging penetration of ultrasound. Developmental studies of the chicken embryo heart are of great interest. Studies in mature hearts, zebrafish animal models, and to a more limited degree chicken embryos, indicate a relationship between blood flow and development. It is believed that at the earliest stages, when the heart is still a tube, the purpose of blood flow is not for convective transport of oxygen, nutrients and waster, bur rather to induce shear-related gene expressions to induce further development. Yet, to this date, the simple question of "what makes blood flow?" has not been answered. This is mainly due limited availability to adequate imaging and blood flow measurement tools. Earlier work has demonstrated the potential of OCT for use in studying chicken embryo heart development...

Complex Systems Biology of Organisms

I. C. Baianu
Fonte: Nature Preceedings Publicador: Nature Preceedings
Tipo: Manuscript
Relevância na Pesquisa
56.03%
Complex Systems Biology models and theories are axiomatically defined in terms of concrete categories and organismic supercategories (OS) to include both complete self-reproduction of logically defined pi-entities founded in Quine's logic and dynamic system diagrams subject to both algebraic and topological transformations. Mathematical models of complex organisms are expressed in terms of category theory and organismic supercategories (OS). OS theories have applications in: Bioinformatics, Developmental Biology, Genomics and Molecular Cell Biology

El retorno de la ontogenia: un conflicto de ideales de orden natural en la biología evolucionaria actual; The return of ontogeny: conflicting ideals of natural order in recent evolutionary biology

Caponi, Gustavo
Fonte: Universidade de São Paulo. Faculdade de Filosofia, Letras e Ciências Humanas Publicador: Universidade de São Paulo. Faculdade de Filosofia, Letras e Ciências Humanas
Tipo: info:eu-repo/semantics/article; info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion; ; ; ; ; ; Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 01/03/2007 SPA
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55.96%
En este trabajo procuraré mostrar que la noción de ideal de orden natural, enunciada por Stephen Toulmin, podría ser muy útil para caracterizar el conflicto entre el neodarwinismo ortodoxo y la biología evolucionaria desenvolvimiental, o evo-devo, que hoy parece conmover los fundamentos de la nueva síntesis. Las investigaciones en evo-devo, diré, están propiciando un replanteamiento de la relación entre ontogenia y filogenia que supone desplazamiento de lo que caracterizaré como el ideal de orden natural del darwinismo clásico. Así, después de intentar identificar este último ideal de orden natural, procuraré mostrar cual sería el ideal de orden natural alternativo al que obedecerían las actuales indagaciones de la evo-devo.; In this work I will try to show that Stephen Toulmin's notion of an ideal of natural order could be very useful to characterize the clash between the orthodox Neo-Darwinism and the evolutionary developmental biology, or evo-devo, that today seems to affect the very foundations of the new synthesis. The works in evo-devo, I will say, lead to re-examinate the relation between ontogeny and phylogeny in a way that supposes a displacement of which I will characterize as the classic Darwinism's ideal of natural order. Thus...