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Dental fear in Japan: Okayama Prefecture school study of adolescents and adults.

Weinstein, P.; Shimono, T.; Domoto, P.; Wohlers, K.; Matsumura, S.; Ohmura, M.; Uchida, H.; Omachi, K.
Fonte: American Dental Society of Anesthesiology Publicador: American Dental Society of Anesthesiology
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //1992 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
56.63%
A total of 3,041 students and staff in middle school in Okayama Prefecture, Japan, were surveyed regarding dental fear. Over 88% reported fear, with 42.1% classified as having high fear. Almost 70% reported acquiring dental fear prior to junior high school. A majority reported being hurt at the last appointment. Delay of dental work was also reported for over 50% of the sample. Coping, pattern of physiological upset, nondental fears, and sex and age differences were also reported. Results suggest intervention is needed to address the major dental public health problems associated with dental fear.

Dental fear among university students: implications for pharmacological research.

Kaakko, T.; Milgrom, P.; Coldwell, S. E.; Getz, T.; Weinstein, P.; Ramsay, D. S.
Fonte: American Dental Society of Anesthesiology Publicador: American Dental Society of Anesthesiology
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //1998 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
56.56%
University students are often subjects in randomized clinical trials involving anxiolytic and analgesic medications used during clinical dental and medical procedures. The purpose of this study was to describe a typical university student population available for research by using data from a mail survey. Subjects were 350 students chosen randomly from all enrolled, full-time, traditional students on the main campus at the University of Washington in Seattle, WA. The aim was to determine the extent and nature of dental anxiety in this population. In addition, the relationships between subject willingness to receive dental injections and general and mental health and medical avoidance and medical fears were examined. The Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) was used to measure dental anxiety. Dental anxiety was prevalent in this population; 19% of students reported high rates of dental fear. Thirteen percent of students had never had a dental injection. Students with no experience with dental injections were more reluctant than those with experience to receive an injection if one were needed. DAS scores were correlated with injection reluctance. Students who were reluctant to go ahead with a dental injection also reported poorer general and mental health than those who were less reluctant. These students also reported higher medical avoidance and medical anxiety scores. University students provide a rich source of potential subjects for clinical research. The student population...

Medo de dentista na inf??ncia: preval??ncia e fatores associados em uma coorte de nascimentos no sul do Brasil; Dental fear in childhood: prevalence and associated factors in a birth cohort in the south of Brazil

FERRO, Renata da Luz
Fonte: Universidade Federal de Pelotas; Odontologia; Programa de P??s-Gradua????o em Odontologia; UFPel; BR Publicador: Universidade Federal de Pelotas; Odontologia; Programa de P??s-Gradua????o em Odontologia; UFPel; BR
Tipo: Dissertação Formato: application/pdf
POR
Relevância na Pesquisa
66.75%
Dental fear is considered a barrier for the achievement of dental treatments and it can effect negatively in the oral health of children. It is important to investigate the most associated factors to this condition. Objective: Describe the prevalence of dental fear in 5-year-old children and to explore its association with directly related factors to the child and the indirect variables, which are especially related to the mother. Methods: A crosssectional study in a birth cohort initiated in 2004 in Pelotas, Brazil. In the fifth year of life, a sample (n = 1129) on dental fear was investigated and measured through the use of the Dental Anxiety Question (DAQ). Socioeconomic, demographic and behavioral characteristics and dental service use of the mother were investigated as well as the dental experience and oral conditions of the children were assessed. Results: The prevalence of dental fear in children was 16.8%. In the final model, the following variables associated with the outcome were included: maternal education, family income, child gender, past dental experience, the presence of caries and pain, and reasons, location and the age of the child during the first dental visit, After the adjustment, the outcome was associated with the following conditions: the presence of caries...

Are people with dental fear under-represented in oral epidemiological surveys?

Armfield, J.; Slade, G.; Spencer, A.
Fonte: Dr Dietrich Steinkopff Verlag Publicador: Dr Dietrich Steinkopff Verlag
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2009 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
66.72%
Background/: Dental phobia is associated with poorer dental attendance so epidemiological surveys requiring participants to undertake a dental examination may result in an under-representation of participants with high dental fear. Method: We compared the dental fear distribution of participants and non-participants in an oral examination component of a national epidemiological survey of oral health. Of 12,606 in-scope dentate people aged 15+ who completed a structured computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI) survey, 5,505 (43.7%) participated in the oral examination. Dental fear was assessed with a single-item measure in the CATI. Results There was a significant difference between the percentages of participants and non-participants who rated themselves as “extremely” afraid, although the absolute difference (1.9%) was small. The association between extreme dental fear and participation was significant (OR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.56–0.77) in multivariate analyses after controlling for possible confounders. Females with extreme dental fear were also significantly less likely to undertake an oral examination. Conclusion: Even though people with dental fear and phobia may delay or avoid dental visits, they do not appear to be appreciably under-represented in oral epidemiological surveys.; Jason M. Armfield...

Towards a better understanding of dental anxiety and fear: cognitions vs. experiences

Armfield, J.
Fonte: Munksgaard Int Publ Ltd Publicador: Munksgaard Int Publ Ltd
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2010 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
56.74%
Traumatic dental experiences are associated with dental anxiety and fear. However, many people with no dental fear have had negative dental experiences, and some people with considerable fear fail to recall any traumatic incidents. This study aimed to determine whether dental fear was better explained by experiences or by cognitive perceptions of going to the dentist as being uncontrollable, unpredictable, dangerous, and disgusting. A random sample of 1,084 Australian adults (response rate = 71.7%) completed a mailed questionnaire with measures of dental fear, perceptions of going to the dentist, and dental experiences. Perceptions of uncontrollability, unpredictability, dangerousness, and disgustingness had strong bivariate associations with scores on the Index of Dental Anxiety and Fear (IDAF-4C). Vulnerability-related perceptions accounted for 46.3% of the variance in IDAF-4C scores beyond that accounted for by demographic variables and five possible dental experiences comprising intense pain, considerable discomfort, gagging, fainting, and having a personal problem with the dentist. In contrast, dental experiences accounted for < 1% of the variance in IDAF-4C scores beyond that accounted for by the four cognitive perceptions. Perceptions of uncontrollability...

The extent and nature of dental fear and phobia in Australia

Armfield, J.
Fonte: Australian Dental Assn Inc Publicador: Australian Dental Assn Inc
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2010 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
76.74%
Background: For the general dental practitioner, fearful patients are harder and more stressful to treat and are most likely to attend irregularly. This study presents updated and refined dental fear and phobia prevalence estimates in Australia as well as information on the nature of dental fear and phobia. Methods: A total of 1084 Australian adults (response rate = 71.7%) completed a mailed questionnaire. The survey contained four measures of dental fear and phobia, as well as questions regarding potentially anxiety-eliciting dental stimuli and past aversive dental experiences. Results: The prevalence of high dental fear ranged from 7.8% to 18.8%, and more incapacitating dental phobia from 0.9% to 5.4%, depending upon the scale, cut-point and specific criteria used. Dental phobia was significantly associated with blood-injection-injury (BII) concerns. The cost of dental treatment was endorsed as the most anxiety-eliciting dental situation (64.5%), followed by fear of needles ⁄ injections (46.0%) and painful or uncomfortable procedures (42.9%). Anxiety-eliciting stimuli and the type of aversive dental experiences varied significantly by gender, age, income, education, language spoken at home and dental visiting frequency. Conclusions: High dental fear and dental phobia are common in Australia although prevalence estimates are highly dependent on both the scale and cut-points used.; JM Armfield

How do we measure dental fear and what are we measuring anyway?

Armfield, J.
Fonte: Quintessence Publishing Co Ltd Publicador: Quintessence Publishing Co Ltd
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2010 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
66.63%
Dental anxiety shares similar characteristics with many clinical anxiety disorders, and this is especially the case with other specific fears and phobias. These often debilitating conditions comprise several different dimensions, including cognitive, emotional, behavioural and physiological components. In addition, dental anxiety and fear are associated with a range of aversive health consequences. A number of indices have been developed to measure dental anxiety and fear, but their sheer number is indicative of a continuing problem with delineating the concept of dental fear and anxiety and how these should best be measured. This paper addresses the widespread confusion in the use of relevant terminology and aims to trace and assess the theoretical underpinnings of a selection of the most widely used self-report measures. It is concluded that the most popular measures of dental anxiety and fear lack adequate or sufficiently explained theoretical foundations. This is of concern given that these scales, by their very nature, serve to define the concept they aim to measure.; Jason M. Armfield

Australian population norms for the Index of Dental Anxiety and Fear (IDAF-4C)

Armfield, J.
Fonte: Australian Dental Assn Inc Publicador: Australian Dental Assn Inc
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2011 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
56.7%
Background:  The Index of Dental Anxiety and Fear (IDAF-4C) is a theoretically derived test developed to allow clinicians and researchers to measure a person’s level of dental fear. Population norms have not previously been made available for the IDAF-4C. The aim of this study was to provide Australian norms for the IDAF-4C using percentile ranks and to examine associations between scores and individual-level characteristics, dental avoidance and fear of pain. Methods:  A stratified random sample of 1511 Australian adults yielded complete questionnaire data for 1063 individuals (70.4%). Percentile ranks were calculated for IDAF-4C full scale scores stratified by age and gender. Results:  IDAF-4C mean scores varied significantly by age, gender, income, and speaking a language other than English at home. Tables to convert raw scores to percentiles showed that full scale scores varied by age and gender. Scores on the IDAF-4C had strong and significant associations with avoidance of the dentist due to fear, average dental visiting frequency and anxiety about pain when going to the dentist. Conclusions:  Population norms allow clinicians or researchers to compare results for an individual or subgroup to the Australian population. It is recommended that a dental fear scale be used to screen all dental patients for dental fear to enable a more tailored and effective dental treatment experience.; JM Armfield

Exploring the associations between somatization and dental fear and dental visiting

Armfield, J.; Pohjola, V.; Joukamaa, M.; Mattila, A.; Souminen, A.; Lahti, S.
Fonte: Munksgaard Int Publ Ltd Publicador: Munksgaard Int Publ Ltd
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2011 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
66.76%
While somatization has been investigated as an important variable in relation to excessive health-service utilization, its role in relation to dental visiting and dental fear has received limited attention. It was hypothesized that an excessive focus on physical symptoms might lead somatizers to experience dental treatment as more traumatic, resulting in greater dental fear. The aims of this study were to determine whether somatization was associated with dental fear, reduced dental visiting, and symptomatic visiting. Questionnaire data were collected from 5,806 dentate Finnish adults, with somatization measured using 12 items from the Symptom Check List (SCL-90). Dental fear was measured using a single-item question and dental visiting was assessed by questions relating to time since last dental visit and the usual reason for dental visiting. Multinomial logistic regression analyses indicated that somatization has a statistically significant positive association with both dental fear and symptomatic dental visiting after controlling for age, gender, and education. However, the association between dental-visiting frequency and somatization was not statistically significant. The results were consistent with the hypothesized role of somatization in the development of dental fear. Further investigation of how somatization is related to dental fear and dental-service utilization appears warranted.; Jason M. Armfield...

What goes around comes around: Revisiting the hypothesized vicious cycle of dental fear and avoidance

Armfield, J.
Fonte: Blackwell Munksgaard Publicador: Blackwell Munksgaard
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2013 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
66.8%
OBJECTIVES A vicious cycle is believed to operate in the maintenance of dental fear, whereby greater dental fear leads to the delay or avoidance of dental visiting, deteriorated oral health and problem-oriented treatment, which then serves to reinforce the fear. The current study sought to uncover the existence of this vicious cycle pattern and to investigate the role of both dental fear and avoidance in terms of their hypothesized effect on treatment needs and visiting for problems. METHODS Study participants were 1036 (response rate = 71.6%) dentate Australians (aged 15+) from all Australian states and territories. RESULTS Dental fear was associated with avoidance, treatment need and problem-oriented visiting. For people with moderate to high dental fear, 38.5% fit the hypothesized vicious cycle pattern of avoiding dental visiting because of fear, having treatment need and visiting for a problem. This compared with only 0.9% of people with no dental fear. Avoiding going to the dentist was an important predictor of treatment need and problem-oriented visiting independent of dental fear. Dental fear was a statistically significant predictor of treatment need and problem-oriented visiting and also acted as an effect modifier on avoidance because of fear. CONCLUSION The results support the premises underlying the vicious cycle model of dental fear maintenance. Dental fear appears to act as a determinant of avoiding or delaying dental visit...

Dental fear and satisfaction with dental services in Switzerland

Armfield, J.; Enkling, N.; Wolf, C.; Ramseier, C.
Fonte: Wiley Publicador: Wiley
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2014 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
56.74%
Objectives: Dental satisfaction is associated with continuity of dental care, compliance with dentist advice, and positive health outcomes. It is expected that people with higher dental fear might have less dental satisfaction because of more negative dental experiences. The objective of this study was to examine satisfaction and reasons for satisfaction with dental practitioners in Switzerland and variations by dental fear. Methods: A national sample of 1,129 Swiss residents aged 15-74 (mean = 43.2 years) completed a personal interview at their home with questions assessing dental fear, dental service use, general satisfaction with their dentist, and reasons for satisfaction or dissatisfaction. Results: Overall, 47.9 percent of participants responded that they were satisfied with their dentist and 47.6 percent that they were very satisfied. Satisfaction differed significantly by gender, language spoken, region of residence, and educational attainment. Greater dental fear was significantly associated with greater dissatisfaction with the dentist. The percentage of people who were very satisfied with the dentist ranged from 56.0 percent among people with no fear to 30.5 percent for participants with “quite a lot” of fear but was higher (44.4 percent) for people who stated that they were “very much” afraid of the dentist. The most common reasons attributed for satisfaction with dentists were interpersonal characteristics of the dentist and staff. People with “quite a lot” of fear were found to endorse these sentiments least. Conclusions: Although higher dental fear was associated with more dissatisfaction with the dentist...

Development and psychometric evaluation of the Index of Dental Anxiety and Fear (IDAF-4C⁺); Development and psychometric evaluation of the Index of Dental Anxiety and Fear (IDAF-4C(+))

Armfield, J.
Fonte: Amer Psychological Assoc Publicador: Amer Psychological Assoc
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2010 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
56.75%
The measurement of dental fear is important due to its high prevalence and appreciable individual, clinical, and public health consequences. However, existing measures of dental anxiety and fear (DAF) have theoretical or practical limitations. This study describes the development and subsequent assessment of the reliability and validity of test scores of a new DAF scale for adults. The Index of Dental Anxiety and Fear (IDAF-4C+) contains 3 modules that measure DAF, dental phobia, and feared dental stimuli. The final 8-item DAF module (IDAF-4C) assesses emotional, behavioral, physiological, and cognitive components of the anxiety and fear response. The proposed scale dimensionality received support from exploratory factor analysis. IDAF-4C items showed good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = .94) and test-retest reliability at 4 months (r = .82), and the scale was strongly associated with other dental fear scales as well as with dental visiting patterns, avoidance of the dentist, and dental phobia diagnosis. The convergent and predictive validity of the IDAF-4C compared positively to Corah's (1969; Corah, Gale, & Illig, 1978) Dental Anxiety Scale and a single-item measure of dental fear, and the scale predicted future dental visiting and visit perceptions. Both phobia and stimulus modules showed strong and statistically significant associations with DAF ratings. In all...

A preliminary investigation of the relationship of dental fear to other specific fears, general fearfulness, disgust sensitivity and harm sensitivity

Armfield, J.
Fonte: Blackwell Munksgaard Publicador: Blackwell Munksgaard
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2008 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
56.76%
OBJECTIVES: People with dental fear often suffer from other psychological disorders, as well as from a number of other specific fears. Fear of going to the dentist may be associated not only with general fearfulness, but also with underlying personality dispositions. This exploratory study, therefore, investigated the associations between dental fear and 67 other specific fears, general fearfulness, disgust sensitivity and harm sensitivity. METHODS: Participants were 88 Australian adults who were administered the Fear Survey Schedule III (FSS-III), the Harm Sensitivity Index and the Disgust Sensitivity Index. Principle axis factor analysis with Promax rotation was used to examine how dental fear related to other specific fears as measured with the FSS-III. RESULTS: Dental fear was significantly correlated with most of the other specific fears, with factor analysis indicating that it tended to load more with fears related to lack of control rather than with what have often been classed as 'medical' fears. Significant associations were found between dental fear and the personality dispositions of general fearfulness, harm sensitivity and disgust sensitivity, although these associations were not linear. CONCLUSIONS: Findings reveal extensive co-occurrence of other specific fears with dental fear...

Treatment experience, frequency of dental visits, and children's dental fear: a cognitive approach

Carrillo-Diaz, M.; Crego, A.; Armfield, J.; Romero-Maroto, M.
Fonte: Munksgaard Int Publ Ltd Publicador: Munksgaard Int Publ Ltd
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2012 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
56.68%
Cognitive elements play a key role in dental anxiety. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about how dental treatments and frequency of visits to the dentist are related to dental fear and its cognitive antecedents. This study aimed to explore the relationships between dental visits, past treatment experiences, expectations on the aversiveness/probability of negative dental events, and dental fear in children. The participants were 147 children (60% female; mean age = 12.0 yr) who completed a questionnaire comprising measures of dental treatment-related experience (attendance, fillings, and extractions), perceived aversiveness and probability of dental events, and dental anxiety. Bivariate correlations and multiple linear regression analyses were used to analyze the data. A higher frequency of dental visits was associated with less dental fear and a decreased belief in the probability of negative events occurring during treatment. The type of treatments received was not directly linked to dental fear. However, having received fillings was significantly associated with the perceived probability of negative dental events, whereas extractions were positively associated with these expectations but negatively associated with the perceived aversiveness of possible dental events. Regular dental visits...

Applying the Cognitive Vulnerability Model to the analysis of cognitive and family influences on children's dental fear

Crego, A.; Carrillo-Diaz, M.; Armfield, J.; Romero, M.
Fonte: Munksgaard Int Publ Ltd Publicador: Munksgaard Int Publ Ltd
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2013 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
56.77%
Negative experiences, cognitions, and family variables are involved in the etiology of child dental fear, but previous research has frequently considered them separately. This study uses the Cognitive Vulnerability Model to explore the influence of negative dental experiences and family members on children's dental anxiety. The participants were 185 children who completed a questionnaire comprising measures of dental fear and cognitive vulnerability-related perceptions. Measures were obtained for 88 of the participants' fathers and for 97 of the participants' mothers. Cognitive vulnerability perceptions had the strongest association with children's dental fear (β = 0.40), explaining 14-21% of the variance in dental fear scores beyond that explained by other variables. Furthermore, vulnerability perceptions mediated the relationship between negative dental experiences and dental fear. Children's dental fear and cognitive vulnerability perceptions were significantly associated with those of their fathers (r = 0.23 and r = 0.40, respectively) and mothers (r = 0.28 and r = 0.35, respectively). Moreover, fathers' (β = 0.24) and mothers' (β = 0.31) levels of cognitive vulnerability significantly predicted the children's levels of dental fear. The Cognitive Vulnerability Model offers a framework to understand child dental fear. Furthermore...

Dental caries is associated with dental fear in childhood: findings from a birth cohort study

Torriani, D.D.; Ferro, R.L.; Bonow, M.L.M.; Santos, I.S.; Matijasevich, A.; Barros, A.J.; Demarco, F.F.; Peres, K.G.
Fonte: Karger Publishers Publicador: Karger Publishers
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2014 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
66.74%
OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of dental fear in preschool children and to estimate its association with maternal and children characteristics. METHODS: The study was nested in a population-based birth cohort from Pelotas, Brazil, started in 2004. A sample of 1,129 children aged 5 years was dentally examined, and their mothers were interviewed. Dental fear was investigated using a validated instrument through the question ‘Do you think that your child is afraid of going to the dentist?'. The possible answers were (1) ‘no', (2) ‘yes, a little', (3) ‘yes' and (4) ‘yes, a lot'. The outcome was dichotomized as ‘children without dental fear' (answers 1 and 2) and ‘children with dental fear' (answers 3 and 4). Exploratory variables included demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, maternal oral health status and maternal behaviors. The main explanatory variables were caries and dental pain. Data were analyzed using multivariable Poisson regression. RESULTS: The prevalence of dental fear was 16.8% (95% confidence interval 14.6-19.0). Multivariate analysis showed that the lower the family income at birth and the higher the severity of dental caries, the higher the prevalence of dental fear. Children who never visited the dentist and those who frequently experienced dental pain were positively associated with higher dental fear prevalence. CONCLUSIONS: Presence of dental caries and dental pain were associated with dental fear regardless of socioeconomic origin and lack of dental service use in childhood.; D.D. Torriani...

Dental fear and adult oral health in Australia

Armfield, J.; Slade, G.; Spencer, A.
Fonte: Blackwell Munksgaard Publicador: Blackwell Munksgaard
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2009 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
66.76%
OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate the association between dental fear and both dental caries and periodontal indicators. METHODS: A three-stage stratified clustered sample of the Australian adult population completed a computer-assisted telephone interview followed by a clinical examination. Oral health measures were the DMFT index and its components, periodontitis and gingivitis. A total of 5364 adults aged 18-91 years were dentally examined. RESULTS: Higher dental fear was significantly associated with more decayed teeth (DT), missing teeth (MT) and DMFT. There was an inverted 'U' association between dental fear and the number of filled teeth (FT). Periodontitis and gingivitis were not associated with dental fear. The association between dental fear and DMFT was significant for adults aged 18-29 and 30-44 years, but not in older ages. Dental fear was significantly associated with more DT, MT, and DMFT but with fewer FT after controlling for age, sex, income, employment status, tertiary education, dental insurance status and oral hygiene. CONCLUSION: This study helps reconcile some of the conflicting results of previous studies and establishes that dental fear is associated with more decayed and missing teeth but fewer FT. That people with higher dental fear have significantly more caries experience underlines the importance of identifying and then reducing dental fear as important steps in improving adult oral health.; Jason M. Armfield...

Dental fear in Australia: who's afraid of the dentist?

Armfield, J.; Spencer, A.; Stewart, J.
Fonte: Australian Dental Assn Inc Publicador: Australian Dental Assn Inc
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2006 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
76.73%
Background: This study aimed to describe both the prevalence of dental fear in Australia and to explore the relationship between dental fear and a number of demographic, socio-economic, oral health, insurance and service usage variables. Methods: A telephone interview survey of a random sample of 7312 Australian residents, aged five years and over, from all states and territories. Results: The prevalence of high dental fear in the entire sample was 16.1 per cent. A higher percentage of females than males reported high fear (HF). Adults aged 40–64 years old had the highest prevalence of high dental fear with those adults aged 80+ years old having the least. There were also differences between low fear (LF) and HF groups in relation to socioeconomic status (SES), with people from higher SES groups generally having less fear. People with HF were more likely to be dentate, have more missing teeth, be covered by dental insurance and have a longer time since their last visit to a dentist. Conclusions: This study found a high prevalence of dental fear within a contemporary Australian population with numerous differences between individuals with HF and LF in terms of socioeconomic, socio-demographic and self-reported oral health status characteristics.; JM Armfield...

Fear assessment in brazilian children : the relevance of dental fear; Avaliação do medo em crianças brasileiras : a relevância no medo odontológico

Moraes, Antônio Bento Alves de; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Possobon, Rosana de Fátima; Costa Júnior, Áderson Luiz
Fonte: Universidade de Brasília Publicador: Universidade de Brasília
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
ENG
Relevância na Pesquisa
66.63%
ABSTRACT: Fear frequently interferes with dental treatment procedures, producing delays and poor technical quality results. Patients exhibit avoidance and escape behaviors that may be related to aversive childhood experiences in dental treatment situations. The aim of this study was to identify the most frequent children's fears, including dental ones, using an adaptation of the FSSC-R. This instrument was used to assess 549 children divided in three groups: (G1) private school children, (G2) public school children and (G3) public school children who were surveyed during dental treatment. Results indicated higher dental fear scores for females when compared with male children. Considering all groups studied, "injection" was the 5th higher fear for the group G3, 8th for the group G1 and 14th for the group G2. Family relationship items such as "parents fighting", "parents yelling at you", "hearing my parents argue", were considered frequent fears, suggesting that family conflicts may contribute to children's emotional problems. _______________________________________________________________________________ RESUMO; O medo de dentista pode aumentar a duração do tratamento odontológico e produzir resultados aquém do esperado. As crianças exibem comportamentos de fuga ou esquiva que podem estar relacionadas à situação de tratamento odontológico. Este estudo investigou as principais fontes de medo...

Fear assessment in brazilian children: the relevance of dental fear

Moraes,Antonio Bento Alves de; Ambrosano,Gláucia Maria Bovi; Possobon,Rosana de Fátima; Costa Junior,Áderson Luiz
Fonte: Instituto de Psicologia, Universidade de Brasília Publicador: Instituto de Psicologia, Universidade de Brasília
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/12/2004 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
66.63%
Fear frequently interferes with dental treatment procedures, producing delays and poor technical quality results. Patients exhibit avoidance and escape behaviors that may be related to aversive childhood experiences in dental treatment situations. The aim of this study was to identify the most frequent children's fears, including dental ones, using an adaptation of the FSSC-R. This instrument was used to assess 549 children divided in three groups: (G1) private school children, (G2) public school children and (G3) public school children who were surveyed during dental treatment. Results indicated higher dental fear scores for females when compared with male children. Considering all groups studied, "injection" was the 5th higher fear for the group G3, 8th for the group G1 and 14th for the group G2. Family relationship items such as "parents fighting", "parents yelling at you", "hearing my parents argue", were considered frequent fears, suggesting that family conflicts may contribute to children's emotional problems.