Página 1 dos resultados de 2526 itens digitais encontrados em 0.010 segundos
Resultados filtrados por Publicador: Rochester Instituto de Tecnologia

Motion graphics documentary video of Deaf artists of the 21st century

Smith, Heather L.
Fonte: Rochester Instituto de Tecnologia Publicador: Rochester Instituto de Tecnologia
Tipo: Tese de Doutorado
EN_US
Relevância na Pesquisa
37.36%
Deaf art reflects a unique culture where Deaf people express their life experiences, which are different from those of hearing people. Deaf art also shows the joy and community among Deaf people with their shared language and experiences, expressed through art that includes painting, sculpturing, acting, and writing. In other words, Deaf culture is a celebration where we as Deaf people can bond and share our similar experiences with life struggle in this majority world of hearing people. We often seek out other Deaf artists to connect with and get the sense of “home.” That “sense of home” includes not just gathering in person, but also interacting through communications technologies, such as email, websites, blogs, videos, and chat rooms. However, even though there are many examples of videos of Deaf people expressing their deaf experiences in ASL, these were strictly two-dimensional, very flat because they had limited or no motion graphics. Motion graphics allows for more lifelike, three-dimensional representation of visual images, an appropriate medium to use in representing two Deaf artists who use a three-dimensional means of communication: American Sign Language (ASL). Creating this 30-minutes three-dimensional motion graphics video documentary about two Deaf artists...

Modified art curriculum for deaf students with secondary disabilities

Hartman, Laural
Fonte: Rochester Instituto de Tecnologia Publicador: Rochester Instituto de Tecnologia
Tipo: Capstone Project
EN_US
Relevância na Pesquisa
37.42%
This capstone project focuses on creating a modified art curriculum for deaf students with secondary disabilities. From personal experiences, there are art curriculums designed for special education students in general and art curriculums for deaf students, but there is no art curriculum for deaf students with disabilities. Since deaf students with disabilities at residential schools already face a limitation by not being able to hear, they shouldn't face more limitations due to another disability. This paper will present what researchers have said about teaching art to both special education students and deaf students. This paper will also include how deaf and special education students' benefit from creating art and what needs to be done to modify or create a curriculum for deaf students with disabilities. Art is an education area where there is a need for improvement. Coming from a strong art background I chose the idea of establishing a curriculum for deaf students with disabilities, also known as "Deaf plus" because I had first hand experience and some struggle finding resources for teaching art to this specialized population. I know this same issue will continue without a proper resource. During my first internship in Canada...

Deaf theater: audience appeal

Linza, Pamela; Conley, Pamela
Fonte: Rochester Instituto de Tecnologia Publicador: Rochester Instituto de Tecnologia
Tipo: Tese de Doutorado Formato: 1392563 bytes; application/pdf
EN_US
Relevância na Pesquisa
37.4%
A majority of Deaf Americans agree that viewing a typical theatrical performance is a formidable task. In the second half of this century, attitudinal changes made by Americans have resulted in new and increased opportunities for their Deaf counterparts to participate in American theatre. American theatregoers who are Deaf can choose plays in general theatre as well as those in Deaf theatre. However, they experience problems in appreciating plays in Deaf theatre. More specifically, audience appeal is the main problem. Audience appeal refers to a concept in which major aspects of performances are designed to engage the thoughts and reactions of a group of spectators. Its definition is slightly expanded for playgoers who are Deaf; the aspects of performances are generally designed to that they play on human visual capacities. Essential characteristics of audience appeal for Deaf audiences consist of adding sign language principles and conventions from Deaf culture. Scholarly research in the recent years has shown that the Deaf audience members have preferences as to how they enjoy a theatrical experience. Some experts argue that the visual aspect of the performance is the most important consideration, while others contend that choice of language and culture contributes most significantly to appeal for Deaf audiences. Some argue that accessibility...

Deaf studies for transfer deaf adolescents

McNulty, Katherine
Fonte: Rochester Instituto de Tecnologia Publicador: Rochester Instituto de Tecnologia
Tipo: Masters Project
EN_US
Relevância na Pesquisa
37.37%
This capstone project focuses on developing a curriculum unit that deals specifically with Deafhood. The purpose of this curriculum development project is to help deaf students who transferred from mainstreamed schools to a school for the deaf, leam more about the DEAF-WORLD and thusly adapt to the new environment by constructing a Deaf identity and becoming confident in themselves as contributing members of society. Increasingly, transfer students are introduced to a new educational and cultural environment where sign language is free flowing, one of the primary educational and social languages ofthe deaf. The curriculum unit is divided into five programs: 1. Introduction of the DEAFWORLD, 2. Identity/Perception of deaf People, 3. Linguistic Minorities & Deaf Arts, 4. Deafidentity and Diversity, and 5. The Concept of Deafhood. The five programs allow the transfer students to gain knowledge of the DEAF-WORLD and to analyze and discover their identity as they go through a journey of identification process. This curriculum allows them to develop their own sense of Deaf identity, during which they acquire a comprehension and appreciation of Deaf culture, hence, it may impact their academic performance. These deaf individuals need to have self-concept and accept themselves as cultural and characteristic individuals. Thereafter...

Instructional Technology and Education of the Deaf: Supporting Learners, K- College: An International Symposium (2003); E-Learning Across Cultures: Is It Possible?; TabletPC - The New New Thing - Demonstration, and Implications in Deaf Education; Digital Video Conferencing in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Instructional Environments; Administrative Support Technology (AST) Sign Vocabulary CD-ROM Project: A Self-Instructional Sign Language Resource for Faculty, Staff, & Students; Use of Instructional Technologies to Train International Teachers of English to Deaf Students; American Sign Language Video Dictionary and Inflection Guide; Career and Technology Learning Outcomes with Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing High School Students from a Single Activity; How NTID's Office of Admissions Reaches Prospective Students Using Available Technology; Teleconferencing: Meeting the Needs of Prospective Students; Interactive CD-ROM for Speechreading: The new DAVID; What's New with C-Print?; Assessing the Effectiveness of a Web-Supported Course for Deaf College-Aged Students; Technology in the College Search Process; Faculty-Driven Technology Transfer: How NTID's Instructional Technololgy Consortium Brings Technology to the Classroom; Roles and Goals: The Impact of Role Models and Expectations on the Success of Individuals Who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing. NETAC introduces a Career Web site and Video Series!; Online Design: Access for Deaf Students; Using NTID IdeaTools website for teaching about Deaf Art and Deaf Artists; Using Online Courses to Create an Electronic Environment to Support Art and Graphic Instruction in the Classroom; The Use of Web-Based Technology in Teaching Reading and Writing to Deaf Students; Using Interactive Physics Software With Deaf College Students

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester Institute Of Technology; Nippon Foundation of Japan, The; PEN-International; Heschke, Corinne; Beil, Donald; MacKenzie, Douglas; Caccamise, Frank; Berent, Gerald; Poor, Geoffrey; Mallory, James; Sinclai
Fonte: Rochester Instituto de Tecnologia Publicador: Rochester Instituto de Tecnologia
Tipo: Outros Formato: 84092 bytes; 28082 bytes; 27499 bytes; 122436 bytes; 95691 bytes; 27690 bytes; 55016 bytes; 28244 bytes; 32491 bytes; 423238 bytes; 97863 bytes; 28521 bytes; 30402 bytes; 295641 bytes; 28990 bytes; 37117 bytes; 73212 bytes; 26631 bytes; 36510 bytes; 90982
EN_US
Relevância na Pesquisa
37.37%
Symposium held June 23-24, 2003 ~ workshops; June 25-27, 2003 ~ Symposium at National Technical Institute for the Deaf, Rochester Institute of Technology , Rochester, NY. See Symposium website at http://www.rit.edu/~techsym/2003/. The objective of the Symposium is to provide a forum for the educators supporting deaf and hard of hearing learners to disseminate information relative to current and future innovations and developments in the use of educational media and technology in the teaching/learning process. Additionally, pre-conference workshops will provide participants with sophisticated, hands-on training on the use of instructional technology in deaf education. The symposium will offer a diverse program with a good mix of K-12, postsecondary and international representation on the program and in participation. Symposium materials are available at the Symposium website: http://www.rit.edu/~techsym; Sponsored by National Technical Institute for the Deaf at Rochester Institute of Technology, The Nippon Foundation of Japan and PEN-International

The Deaf sixth sense: fact or fiction? Deaf identification by deaf and hearing observers

Bienias, Sarah
Fonte: Rochester Instituto de Tecnologia Publicador: Rochester Instituto de Tecnologia
Tipo: Masters Project Formato: 19509753 bytes; application/pdf
EN_US
Relevância na Pesquisa
37.37%
Many deaf people believe that they possess a "sixth sense" which allows them to intuitively know if another person is deaf or hearing. Research indicating differences in deaf people's mannerisms, language use, and attitudes when compared to hearing people is discussed in this paper. This study tested that theory by videotaping native and non-native users of ASL(both hearing and deaf) in a natural conversation. This videotape was then shown to three groups of subjects - one deaf, one hearing with experience in ASL and Deaf Culture, and one hearing without exposure to ASL and Deaf Culture. The subjects were asked to pick out the deaf people in the conversations, and rate the certainty of their response;later they were asked, why they answered the way they had. The results of the hearing groups and the deaf group were compared, and indicated that there are a number of factors used by deaf people to identify other deaf people. Deaf people do seemto have a "sixth sense", which is influenced primarily by the level of ASLskill used in the conversation. Reasonswhy this may occur are discussed,and the need for future research is indicated.