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Do individuals in better condition survive for longer? Field survival estimates according to male alternative reproductive tactics and sex

MUNGUIA-STEYER, R.; CORDOBA-AGUILAR, A.; ROMO-BELTRAN, A.
Fonte: WILEY-BLACKWELL PUBLISHING, INC Publicador: WILEY-BLACKWELL PUBLISHING, INC
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
ENG
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.24%
There is a gap in terms of the supposed survival differences recorded in the field according to individual condition. This is partly due to our inability to assess survival in the wild. Here we applied modern statistical techniques to field-gathered data in two damselfly species whose males practice alternative reproductive tactics (ARTs) and whose indicators of condition in both sexes are known. In Paraphlebia zoe, there are two ART: a larger black-winged (BW) male which defends mating territories and a smaller hyaline-winged (HW) male that usually acts as a satellite. In this species, condition in both morphs is correlated with body size. In Calopteryx haemorrhoidalis, males follow tactics according to their condition with males in better condition practicing a territorial ART. In addition, in this species, condition correlates positively with wing pigmentation in both sexes. Our prediction for both species was that males practicing the territorial tactic will survive less longer than males using a nonterritorial tactic, and larger or more pigmented animals will survive for longer. In P. zoe, BW males survived less than females but did not differ from HW males, and not necessarily larger individuals survived for longer. In fact, size affected survival but only when group identity was analysed...

Male and female interactions during courtship of the Neotropical damselfly Mnesarete pudica (Odonata: Calopterygidae)

Guillermo-Ferreira, Rhainer; Bispo, Pitagoras C.
Fonte: SPRINGER HEIDELBERG; HEIDELBERG Publicador: SPRINGER HEIDELBERG; HEIDELBERG
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
ENG
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.24%
The courtship behavior in calopterygid damselflies is well documented; however, the behavior of the large Neotropical genus Mnesarete is still unknown. Thus, here we present the first description of male-female interactions in Mnesarete pudica, a common damselfly in the Neotropical Savanna. The male-female interactions were composed of courtship displays, mounting, and chasing. The courtship behavior lasted 5.23 +/- 1.65 s and is very different from other calopterygids, consisting of hovering flights and the cross display made in front of females rather than on the oviposition site. The arrival and presence of females on a male territory are not sufficient to initiate sexual interactions; the male usually interacts with the female only after a patrolling flight. The females may present three distinct behaviors in response to male approach: (a) warding off signal (31.53%), (b) escape (28.83%), (c) and wing flipping (39.64%), which seems to stimulate male courtship. Females also may sit still, which induces males to react as if females were signaling they are willing to mate. In this paper, we also suggest that male courtship behavior is mediated by female signals.; CAPES; CAPES; FAPESP [04/09711-8, 09/53233-7]; FAPESP; CNPq [477349/2007-2...

Reproductive behavior of Acanthagrion truncatum Selys, 1876 (Odonata: Coenagrionidae)

Guillermo-Ferreira, Rhainer; Del-Claro, Kleber
Fonte: TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD; ABINGDON Publicador: TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD; ABINGDON
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
ENG
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.56%
Behavioral data on Neotropical coenagrionids is still scanty, with very few studies on their reproductive behavior. Here we present the first description of the reproductive behavior of A. truncatum in a high density population in the Brazilian Neotropical savanna. The observations were made at a pond in an ecological reserve. Males remain at the water searching for females. Females remain in the surrounding vegetation and only approach the water to mate and oviposit. The mean duration of copulation was 25.6 +/- 3.26 minutes. Copulations are concentrated between 12:00 and 14:00 h (71%). Females oviposit in tandem with males, sometimes submerging to oviposit. Oviposition took 43.08 +/- 22.17 minutes. Female underwater oviposition seems to disrupt male guarding and females emerge from the water by themselves. Malemale interactions usually consist of chases and facing off. This damselfly species is apparently non-territorial, since males did not defend resources and searched for females in the area.; CNPq; CNPq; CAPES; CAPES

Male and female interactions during courtship of the Neotropical damselfly Mnesarete pudica (Odonata: Calopterygidae)

Guillermo-Ferreira, Rhainer; Bispo, Pitagoras C.
Fonte: Springer Heidelberg Publicador: Springer Heidelberg
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: 173-178
ENG
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.24%
Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (CAPES); Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP); Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq); Processo FAPESP: 04/09711-8; Processo FAPESP: 09/53233-7; The courtship behavior in calopterygid damselflies is well documented; however, the behavior of the large Neotropical genus Mnesarete is still unknown. Thus, here we present the first description of male-female interactions in Mnesarete pudica, a common damselfly in the Neotropical Savanna. The male-female interactions were composed of courtship displays, mounting, and chasing. The courtship behavior lasted 5.23 +/- 1.65 s and is very different from other calopterygids, consisting of hovering flights and the cross display made in front of females rather than on the oviposition site. The arrival and presence of females on a male territory are not sufficient to initiate sexual interactions; the male usually interacts with the female only after a patrolling flight. The females may present three distinct behaviors in response to male approach: (a) warding off signal (31.53%), (b) escape (28.83%), (c) and wing flipping (39.64%), which seems to stimulate male courtship. Females also may sit still...

The Role of Wing Pigmentation, UV and Fluorescence as Signals in a Neotropical Damselfly

Guillermo-Ferreira, Rhainer; Therézio, Eralci M.; Gehlen, Marcelo H.; Bispo, Pitágoras C.; Marletta, Alexandre
Fonte: Universidade Estadual Paulista Publicador: Universidade Estadual Paulista
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: 1-14
ENG
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.24%
Pigmentation patterns, ultraviolet reflection and fluorescent emission are often involved in mate recognition and mate quality functions in many animal taxa. We investigated the role of wing ultra-violet reflection, fluorescence emission, and pigmentation on age and sexual signals in the damselfly Mnesarete pudica. In this species, wings are sexually dimorphic in colour and exhibit age dependency: males and females show a smoky black colouration when young, turning red in mature males while it turns brown in females. First, we investigated wing UV patterns through reflectance and emission spectra. Second, behavioural experiments were undertaken to show male and female responses to manipulated wing pigmentation and experimentally reduced UV (UV-). Reflectance spectra of the wings of juvenile and mature males and females were used to show the differences between controls and individuals with manipulated colouration used in the behavioural experiment. UV-reduced, females with wings painted red, and control males and females were tethered and presented to conspecific males and females, and their behavioral responses were recorded. The male red wing pigmentation and females with red wings elicited an aggressive response in territorial males and a sexual response in females. Both males and females showed neutral responses towards individuals with reduced UV. Wing signals of juvenile individuals also provoked neutral responses. These results suggest that UV...

Behavior of the Amazonian damselfly Chalcopteryx scintillans McLachlan (Zygoptera: Polythoridae) and comments on its morphological distinction from C. rutilans (Rambur)

Guillermo-Ferreira, Rhainer; Neiss, Ulisses Gaspar; Hamada, Neusa; Bispo, Pitagoras C.
Fonte: Taylor & Francis Ltd Publicador: Taylor & Francis Ltd
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: 251-258
ENG
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.24%
Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (CAPES); Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP); Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq); Processo FAPESP: 13/00406-7; Processo FAPESP: 12/21196-8; Polythorid damselflies are Neotropical stream dwellers, whose behavior has rarely been recorded. Here we describe the territorial and courtship behavior of Chalcopteryx scintillans McLachlan, an Amazonian damselfly with shiny copper-colored hind wings. Territorial behavior consists of aerial contests, when males engage in threat displays and mutual pursuits in ascending and rocking flights. During courtship, males hold their coppery hind wings still while hovering with their forewings, showing the hind wings to females, which hover in front of the male in response. After copulation, the male exhibits the courtship flight again by hovering over the oviposition resource (i.e. fallen tree trunk) on the stream. The females oviposit on the trunk while the males guard them by perching near and hovering around them constantly. We also present behavioral notes on reproductive and oviposition behavior, and comments on the differentiation between C. scintillans and C. rutilans (Rambur).

Variable assessment of wing colouration in aerial contests of the red-winged damselfly Mnesarete pudica (Zygoptera, Calopterygidae)

Ferreira, Rhainer Guillermo; Gorb, Stanislav N.; Appel, Esther; Bispo, Pitágoras da Conceição
Fonte: Universidade Estadual Paulista Publicador: Universidade Estadual Paulista
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: 1-10
ENG
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.24%
Wing pigmentation is a trait that predicts the outcome of male contests in some damselflies. Thus, it is reasonable to suppose that males would have the ability to assess wing pigmentation and adjust investment in a fight according to the costs that the rival may potentially impose. Males of the damselfly Mnesarete pudica exhibit red-coloured wings and complex courtship behaviour and engage in striking male– male fights. In this study, we investigated male assessment behaviour during aerial contests. Theory suggests that the relationship between male resource-holding potential (RHP) and contest duration describes the kind of assessment adopted by males: self-assessment, opponent-only assessment or mutual assessment. A recent theory also suggests that weak and strong males exhibit variations in the assessment strategies adopted. We estimated male RHP through male body size and wing colouration (i.e. pigmentation, wing reflectance spectra and transmission spectra) and studied the relationship between male RHP and contest duration from videodocumented behavioural observations of naturally occurring individual contests in the field. The results showed that males with more opaque wings and larger red spots were more likely to win contests. The relationships between RHP and contest durations partly supported the self-assessment and the mutual assessment models. We then experimentally augmented the pigmented area of the wings...

Behavioral ecology of Heteragrion consors Hagen (Odonata, Megapodagrionidae): a shade-seek Atlantic forest damselfly

Loiola,Geovanni Ribeiro; De Marco,Paulo
Fonte: Sociedade Brasileira De Entomologia Publicador: Sociedade Brasileira De Entomologia
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/09/2011 EN
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27.24%
Behavioral ecology of Heteragrion consors Hagen (Odonata: Megapodagrionidae): a shade-seek Atlantic forest damselfly. The intensity of the inter and intra-sexual selection can affect male behavioral traits as territorial fidelity and aggressiveness allowing the existence of different strategies. However, its differential success could be affected by environmental - as the diel variation in temperature - and physiological constrains - as the variation in thermoregulatory abilities. In this context, we present a behavioral analysis of Heteragrion consors (Zygoptera, Megapodagrionidae) trying to characterize its mating system, diel activity pattern, temporal budget, territoriality and reproductive biology. These data were obtained based on field observations using the focal individual method and mark-recapture techniques in 120 m of a shaded Atlantic Forest stream in Brazil. The males of this species were territorial, varying in its local fidelity, while the females appear sporadically. Males were perched in the majority of the time, but were also observed in cleaning movements, longitudinal abdominal flexion, wing flexion and sperm transfer during perch. The males presented a perched thermoregulatory behavior related to an exothermic regulation. Foraging and agonistic interactions were rare...

Philogenia nemesioi, a new damselfly from Peru (Odonata, Megapodagrionidae)

Machado,Angelo B. M.
Fonte: Sociedade Brasileira De Entomologia Publicador: Sociedade Brasileira De Entomologia
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/12/2013 EN
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27.24%
Philogenia nemesioi, a new damselfly from Peru (Odonata, Megapodagrionidae). Philogenia nemesioi sp. nov. is described and illustrated based on one male specimen collected on forests of the eastern slope of the Peruvian Andes at 900 m. It belongs to the cristalina group, but differs from other species of the group by the structure of the anal appendage.

Environmental integrity and damselfly species composition in Amazonian streams at the "arc of deforestation" region, Mato Grosso, Brazil

Brasil,Leandro Schlemmer; Batista,Joana Darc; Giehl,Nubia França da Silva; Valadão,Marco Bruno Xavier; Santos,Josias Oliveira dos; Dias-Silva,Karina
Fonte: Associação Brasileira de Limnologia Publicador: Associação Brasileira de Limnologia
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/09/2014 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.24%
AIMS: Investigated how the loss of environmental integrity affects damselfly species composition in nine sites with different levels of environmental integrity in a Cerrado-Amazon transition region known as "arc of deforestation" in Mato Grosso State, Brazil. We also tested the influence of environmental variables on species composition. METHODS: We collected in transects of 100 m and used ordination (PCoA) and simple linear regression. RESULTS: Species composition was strongly influenced by the environmental quality of sites, and the best model to explain species composition included variables related to channel morphology. CONCLUSIONS: These results are connected to the environmental homogenization and loss of environmental integrity as a result of extensive agricultural practices which alter stream communities of dragonflies in this region.

A mechanistic link between parasite resistance and expression of a sexually selected trait in a damselfly.

Siva-Jothy, M T
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 22/12/2000 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.24%
This paper examines a field-based insect system in which a signal trait and an immune effector system responsible for parasite resistance rely on the same melanin-producing enzyme cascade (phenoloxidase, PO). Observations and experiments on males of the calopterygid damselfly Calopteryx splendens xanthostoma revealed that resistance to the prevalent parasite in the study system (a eugregarine protozoan infecting the mid-gut) was correlated with quantitative aspects of the sexually dimorphic melanized wingspot of males, a trait that is produced and fixed before the host comes into contact with the sporozsoites of the parasite. Regulation of PO during experimental immune challenge showed that males with dark, homogenous melanin distribution in their wings showed no change in PO levels 24 h after challenge. By contrast males with lighter and/or more heterogenous melanin distribution in their wings tended to show higher PO levels 2-h after immune challenge. The changes in PO levels occur despite the lack of a relationship between wing-pigment distribution and the cellular encapsulation response. These results suggest a shared, limiting resource may form the mechanistic basis of the trade-off between a condition-dependent signal trait and immune function in this system.

Compensatory growth and oxidative stress in a damselfly

De Block, Marjan; Stoks, Robby
Fonte: The Royal Society Publicador: The Royal Society
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.24%
Physiological costs of compensatory growth are poorly understood, yet may be the key components in explaining why growth rates are typically submaximal. Here we tested the hypothesized direct costs of compensatory growth in terms of oxidative stress. We assessed oxidative stress in a study where we generated compensatory growth in body mass by exposing larvae of the damselfly Lestes viridis to a transient starvation period followed by ad libitum food. Compensatory growth in the larval stage was associated with higher oxidative stress (as measured by induction of superoxide dismutase and catalase) in the adult stage. Our results challenge two traditional views of life-history theory. First, they indicate that age and mass at metamorphosis not necessarily completely translate larval stress into adult fitness and that the observed physiological cost may explain hidden carry-over effects. Second, they support the notion that costs of compensatory growth may be associated with free-radical-mediated trade-offs and not necessarily with resource-mediated trade-offs.

Condition and Phenotype-Dependent Dispersal in a Damselfly, Calopteryx splendens

Chaput-Bardy, Audrey; Grégoire, Arnaud; Baguette, Michel; Pagano, Alain; Secondi, Jean
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 18/05/2010 EN
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27.24%
Individual dispersal decisions may be affected by the internal state of the individual and the external information of its current environment. Here we estimated the influence of dispersal on survival and investigated if individual phenotype (sex and wing length) and environmental condition (conspecific density and sex-ratio) affected dispersal decisions in the banded damselfly, Calopteryx splendens. As suspected from the literature, we showed that the proportion of dispersing individuals was higher in females than in males. We also found negative-density dependent dispersal in both sexes and influence of sex-ratio on dispersal. Individuals moved less when sex-ratio was male biased. These results are consistent with a lek mating system where males aggregate in a place and hold mating territories. Contrary to our expectations, neither dispersal nor survival was affected by wing length. Nevertheless, mean adult survival was about 8% lower in dispersing individuals than in residents. This might reflect a mortality cost due to dispersal.

Environmental and Climatic Determinants of Molecular Diversity and Genetic Population Structure in a Coenagrionid Damselfly

Wellenreuther, Maren; Sánchez-Guillén, Rosa A.; Cordero-Rivera, Adolfo; Svensson, Erik I.; Hansson, Bengt
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 31/05/2011 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.24%
Identifying environmental factors that structure intraspecific genetic diversity is of interest for both habitat preservation and biodiversity conservation. Recent advances in statistical and geographical genetics make it possible to investigate how environmental factors affect geographic organisation and population structure of molecular genetic diversity within species. Here we present a study on a common and wide ranging insect, the blue tailed damselfly Ischnuraelegans, which has been the target of many ecological and evolutionary studies. We addressed the following questions: (i) Is the population structure affected by longitudinal or latitudinal gradients?; (ii) Do geographic boundaries limit gene flow?; (iii) Does geographic distance affect connectivity and is there a signature of past bottlenecks?; (iv) Is there evidence of a recent range expansion and (vi) what is the effect of geography and climatic factors on population structure? We found low to moderate genetic sub-structuring between populations (mean FST = 0.06...

Wing Shape and Its Influence on the Outcome of Territorial Contests in the Damselfly Calopteryx virgo

Bots, Jessica; Breuker, Casper J.; Kaunisto, Kari M.; Koskimäki, Jani; Gossum, Hans Van; Suhonen, Jukka
Fonte: University of Wisconsin Library Publicador: University of Wisconsin Library
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 12/08/2012 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.24%
Male mating success is often determined by territory ownership and traits associated with successful territory defense. Empirical studies have shown that the territory owner wins the majority of fights with challenging males. Several physical and physiological traits have been found to correlate with resource holding potential. In addition, in aerial insects, wing design may also have a strong influence on resource holding potential, since it determines efficiency and precision during flight. However, this possibility has not yet been thoroughly evaluated using the modern technique of geometric morphometrics to analyze shape. Therefore, this study examined whether wing shape affects the outcome of male-male contests in the territorial damselfly, Calopteryx virgo (L.) (Odonata: Calopterygidae). Wing shape and also traditional flight-related morphological measures were compared between 27 pairs of winners and losers from experimental territorial contests. Contrary to expectations, there were no differences between winners and losers in all studied wing traits (shape, length, width, total surface, aspect ratio, and wing loading). However, highly significant differences in wing shape and size were detected between the fore- and hindwing. It is currently not known how these differences relate to flight performance...

Fitness Effects of Chlorpyrifos in the Damselfly Enallagma cyathigerum Strongly Depend upon Temperature and Food Level and Can Bridge Metamorphosis

Janssens, Lizanne; Stoks, Robby
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 26/06/2013 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.24%
Interactions between pollutants and suboptimal environmental conditions can have severe consequences for the toxicity of pollutants, yet are still poorly understood. To identify patterns across environmental conditions and across fitness-related variables we exposed Enallagma cyathigerum damselfly larvae to the pesticide chlorpyrifos at two food levels or at two temperatures and quantified four fitness-related variables (larval survival, development time, mass at emergence and adult cold resistance). Food level and temperature did not affect survival in the absence of the pesticide, yet the pesticide reduced survival only at the high temperature. Animals reacted to the pesticide by accelerating their development but only at the high food level and at the low temperature; at the low food level, however, pesticide exposure resulted in a slower development. Chlorpyrifos exposure resulted in smaller adults except in animals reared at the high food level. Animals reared at the low food level and at the low temperature had a higher cold resistance which was not affected by the pesticide. In summary our study highlight that combined effects of exposure to chlorpyrifos and the two environmental conditions (i) were mostly interactive and sometimes even reversed in comparison with the effect of the environmental condition in isolation...

Hydrophylita (Lutzimicron) emporos Shih & Polaszek (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) from Taiwan, Parasitising Eggs, and Phoretic on Adults, of the Damselfly Psolodesmus mandarinus mandarinus (Zygoptera: Calopterygidae)

Shih, Yuan Tung; Ko, Chiun Cheng; Pan, Kuang Tao; Lin, Sue Cheng; Polaszek, Andrew
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 24/07/2013 EN
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27.24%
Hydrophylita emporos n. sp. reared from eggs of Psolodesmus mandarinus mandarinus McLachlan (Zygoptera: Calopterygidae) in Taiwan is described. This is the first species of Hydrophylita to be described from the Old World, and the first record of phoresy in the genus. Adult females were observed aggregating at the base of the female damselfly’s abdomen. When the damselfly begins ovipositing, females move to the tip of the abdomen, enter the water and quickly locate eggs for parasitising. The article contains links to video footage of this process.

Rapid range expansion increases genetic differentiation while causing limited reduction in genetic diversity in a damselfly

Swaegers, J; Mergeay, J; Therry, L; Larmuseau, M H D; Bonte, D; Stoks, R
Fonte: Nature Publishing Group Publicador: Nature Publishing Group
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.24%
Many ectothermic species are currently expanding their geographic range due to global warming. This can modify the population genetic diversity and structure of these species because of genetic drift during the colonization of new areas. Although the genetic signatures of historical range expansions have been investigated in an array of species, the genetic consequences of natural, contemporary range expansions have received little attention, with the only studies available focusing on range expansions along a narrow front. We investigate the genetic consequences of a natural range expansion in the Mediterranean damselfly Coenagrion scitulum, which is currently rapidly expanding along a broad front in different directions. We assessed genetic diversity and genetic structure using 12 microsatellite markers in five centrally located populations and five recently established populations at the edge of the geographic distribution. Our results suggest that, although a marginal significant decrease in the allelic richness was found in the edge populations, genetic diversity has been preserved during the range expansion of this species. Nevertheless, edge populations were genetically more differentiated compared with core populations, suggesting genetic drift during the range expansion. The smaller effective population sizes of the edge populations compared with central populations also suggest a contribution of genetic drift after colonization. We argue and document that range expansion along multiple axes of a broad expansion front generates little reduction in genetic diversity...

Spectral Sensitivities and Color Signals in a Polymorphic Damselfly

Huang, Shao-chang; Chiou, Tsyr-huei; Marshall, Justin; Reinhard, Judith
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 31/01/2014 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.24%
Animal communication relies on conspicuous signals and compatible signal perception abilities. Good signal perception abilities are particularly important for polymorphic animals where mate choice can be a challenge. Behavioral studies suggest that polymorphic damselflies use their varying body colorations and/or color patterns as communication signal for mate choice and to control mating frequencies. However, solid evidence for this hypothesis combining physiological with spectral and behavioral data is scarce. We investigated this question in the Australian common blue tail damselfly, Ischnura heterosticta, which has pronounced female-limited polymorphism: andromorphs have a male-like blue coloration and gynomorphs display green/grey colors. We measured body color reflectance and investigated the visual capacities of each morph, showing that I. heterosticta have at least three types of photoreceptors sensitive to UV, blue, and green wavelength, and that this visual perception ability enables them to detect the spectral properties of the color signals emitted from the various color morphs in both males and females. We further demonstrate that different color morphs can be discriminated against each other and the vegetation based on color contrast. Finally...

Flying with Abrupt Wing Flapping: Damselfly in Darting Flight

Li, Chengyu; Dong, Haibo; Zhang, Wen
Fonte: Universidade Cornell Publicador: Universidade Cornell
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 11/10/2013
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27.56%
Damselflies show abrupt, darting flight, which is the envy of aero-engineers. This amazing ability is used both to capture prey and, by males, to establish territories that can attract females. In this work, high-resolution, high-speed videos of a damselfly (Hetaerina Americana) in darting flight were obtained using a photogrammetry system. Using a 3D subdivision surface reconstruction methodology, the damselfly's wing deformation and kinematics were modeled and reconstructed from those videos. High fidelity simulations were then carried out in order to understand vortex formation in both near-field and far-field of damselfly wings and examine the associated aerodynamic performance. A Cartesian grid based sharp interface immersed boundary solver was used to handle such flows in all their complexity.; Comment: videos are included for APS gallery