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Medigap Reform Legislation of 1990: Have the Objectives Been Met?

McCormack, Lauren A.; Fox, Peter D.; Rice, Thomas; Graham, Marcia L.
Fonte: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES Publicador: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //1996 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
105.5%
The 1990 medigap reform legislation had multiple objectives: To simplify the insurance market in order to facilitate policy comparison, provide consumer choice, provide market stability, promote competition, and avoid adverse selection. Based on case study interviews with a cross-section of individuals and organizations, we report that most of these objectives have been achieved. Consumers of medigap plans are able to make more informed choices, largely because they can adequately compare policies based on standard benefits. Marketing abuses have apparently declined, as evidenced by a decrease in the number of consumer complaints. Finally, no major detrimental impact on the insurance industry was detected. Beneficiaries still face some confusion in this market, however, such as understanding the rating methodologies used to set premiums and how this may affect their choices. Confusion could increase with the growth of managed care options.

Consumer Information Development and Use

McCormack, Lauren A.; Garfinkel, Steven A.; Schnaier, Jenny A.; Lee, A. James; Sangl, Judith A.
Fonte: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES Publicador: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //1996 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
135.59%
The availability of informational materials to aid consumer health care purchasing decisions is increasing. Organizations developing and disseminating materials include public- and private-sector employers, providers, purchasing cooperatives, State agencies, counseling programs, and accreditation bodies. Based on case study interviews with 24 organizations, we learned that 10 included consumer satisfaction ratings and performance measures based on medical records. An additional four organizations developed materials with consumer satisfaction ratings exclusively. Printed materials were the most common medium used to convey information to consumers. However, other mechanisms for conveying the information were also employed. On the whole, the materials have not been rigorously evaluated. Evaluations are needed to determine if consumers find the information useful and how different individuals prefer to receive the information.

Condition-Specific Performance Information: Assessing Salience, Comprehension, and Approaches for Communicating Quality

Hibbard, Judith H.; Sofaer, Shoshanna; Jewett, Jacquelyn J.
Fonte: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES Publicador: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //1996 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
115.59%
This study assesses how consumers view condition-specific performance measures and builds on an earlier study to test an approach for communicating quality information. The study uses three separate designs: a small experiment, a cross-sectional analysis of survey data, and focus groups. We test whether providing information on the health care context affects consumer understanding of indicators. Focus groups were used to explore how consumers view performance measures. The cross-sectional survey analysis used survey data from the experiment and the focus groups to look at comprehension and the salience of condition-specific performance measures. Findings show that a general consumer population does view condition-specific performance measures as salient. Further, the findings provide evidence that information on the health care context makes a difference in how consumers understand performance measures.

DataView: National Health Expenditures, 1995

Levit, Katharine R.; Lazenby, Helen C.; Braden, Bradley R.; Cowan, Cathy A.; McDonnell, Patricia A.; Sivarajan, Lekha; Stiller, Jean M.; Won, Darleen K.; Donham, Carolyn S.; Long, Anna M.; Stewart, Madie W.
Fonte: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES Publicador: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //1996 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
125.51%
This article presents data on health care spending for the United States, covering expenditures for various types of medical services and products and their sources of funding from 1960 to 1995. In 1995, $988.5 billion was spent to purchase health care in the United States, up 5.5 percent from 1994. Growth in spending between 1993 and 1995 was the slowest in more than three decades, primarily because of slow growth in private health insurance and out-of-pocket spending. As a result, the share of health spending funded by private sources fell, reflecting the influence of increased enrollment in managed care plans.

Health Care Indicators: Hospital, Employment, and Price Indicators for the Health Care Industry: First Quarter 1996

Sensenig, Arthur L.; Heffler, Stephen K.
Fonte: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES Publicador: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //1996 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
125.52%
This regular feature of the journal includes a discussion of recent trends in health care spending, employment, and prices. The statistics presented in this article are valuable in their own right and for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they allow us to anticipate the direction and magnitude of health care cost changes prior to the availability of more comprehensive data.

Role of Information in Consumer Selection of Health Plans

Sainfort, François; Booske, Bridget C.
Fonte: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES Publicador: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //1996 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
125.59%
Considerable efforts are underway in the public and private sectors to increase the amount of information available to consumers when making health plan choices. The objective of this study was to examine the role of information in consumer health plan decisionmaking. A computer system was developed which provides different plan descriptions with the option of accessing varying types and levels of information. The system tracked the information search processes and recorded the hypothetical plan choices of 202 subjects. Results are reported showing the relationship between information and problem perception, preference structure, choice of plan, and attitude towards the decision.

DataView: Use of Medicare Data to Identify Incident Breast Cancer Cases

Warren, Joan L.; Riley, Gerald F.; McBean, A. Marshall; Hakim, Rosemarie
Fonte: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES Publicador: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //1996 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
105.45%
Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) provide reliable information about cancer incidence. However, because SEER data are geographically limited and have a 2-year time lag, we evaluated whether Medicare data could provide timely information on cancer incidence. Comparing Medicare women hospitalized for breast cancer with women reported to SEER, Medicare data had high specificity (96.6 percent), yet low sensitivity (59.4 percent). We conclude that Medicare hospitalization data can identify incident cases for cancers that usually require inpatient hospitalization. For cancers that often only receive outpatient treatment, such as breast cancer, additional Medicare data, such as physician bills, are needed to understand the entirety of treatment practices.

MCBS Highlights: Medicare Beneficiary Information Needs: 1994

Eppig, Franklin J.; Poisal, John A.
Fonte: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES Publicador: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //1996 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
105.44%

Employer-Specific Versus Community-Wide Report Cards: Is There a Difference?

Knutson, David J.; Fowles, Jinnet B.; Finch, Michael; McGee, Jeanne; Dahms, Nanette; Kind, Elizabeth A.; Adlis, Susan
Fonte: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES Publicador: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //1996 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
115.43%
This article describes preliminary results from a natural experiment that tested the impact of report cards on employees. As part of the 1995 enrollment process, some members of the State of Minnesota Employee Group Insurance Program received report cards on the plans offered to them, and others did not. Both groups of employees had a chance to review a second community-wide report card covering all Minnesota plans that had been distributed by an independent organization through local newspapers. Both groups were surveyed before and after they made their health plan selections. We compare the likelihood of seeing, the intensity of reading, and the perceived helpfulness of the first, employer-specific report card with the second, community-wide report card for consumers who make plan selections.

Personal Decisionmaking Styles and Long-Term Care Choices

Maloney, Susan K.; Finn, Jeffrey; Bloom, Diane L.; Andresen, Julie
Fonte: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES Publicador: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //1996 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
105.54%
To learn more about how older people make decisions about long-term care (LTC), in-depth interviews were conducted with 63 elderly individuals and 56 of their relatives to obtain information on the decisionmaking process. This qualitative research showed that LTC decisionmaking does not always follow typical consumer dedisionmaking models, in which a consumer seeks a product or service, selects among the alternatives, and assesses the choice. Further, the interviews yielded four long-term care decisionmaking styles among older adults related to their degree of planning or not planning. This study underscores the need to develop tailored communications for older people and their families aimed at encouraging appropriate and cost-effective use of LTC services.

Consumer Perspectives on Information Needs for Health Plan Choice

Gibbs, Deborah A.; Sangl, Judith A.; Burrus, Barri
Fonte: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES Publicador: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //1996 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
125.6%
The premise that competition will improve health care assumes that consumers will choose plans that best fit their needs and resources. However, many consumers are frustrated with currently available plan comparison information. We describe results from 22 focus groups in which Medicare beneficiaries, Medicaid enrollees, and privately insured consumers assessed the usefulness of indicators based on consumer survey data and Health Employer Data Information Set (HEDIS)-type measures of quality of care. Considerable education would be required before consumers could interpret report card data to inform plan choices. Policy implications for design and provision of plan information for Medicare beneficiaries and Medicaid enrollees are discussed.

The Effect of Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Advertising on Geographic Variations of Medical Care

Eldar-Lissai, Adi ; Phelps, Charles E.
Fonte: Universidade de Rochester Publicador: Universidade de Rochester
Tipo: Tese de Doutorado
ENG
Relevância na Pesquisa
35.58%
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Rochester. School of Medicine and Dentistry. Dept. of Community & Preventive Medicine, 2010.; Background and Objectives Over the last decade, patients have attained multiple new channels through which to obtain information, including the internet and written and broadcast media. The use of Direct-to-Consumer Advertising (DTCA) of prescription drugs is pervasive in the US; almost every person has at some point encountered a prescription drug advertisement. Exposure to DTCA increases patients’ awareness of the existence of available treatments. While the quality of information provided in such advertisements may be controversial, it has been shown to prompt patients to initiate discussions with their physicians and explore treatment options, and thus is changing clinical practice in the community. The overall goal of this study is to measure the effects of DTCA on geographic variation and health outcomes, in particular, in the contexts of cancer therapy. The study has three specific aims: (1) to measure changes in utilization and geographic variations of supportive care of cancer therapy; (2) to measure changes in health outcomes following a DTCA; and (3) to estimate the societal costs and benefits associated with DTCA. Methods National and Local advertisements of a cancer- related drug (pegfilgrastim; Neulasta) were used as a case-study to conduct a ‘before-after’ comparison under a ‘natural experiment’ setting...

A Point-of-Sale Communications Campaign to Provide Consumers Safety Information on Drug-Dietary Supplement Interactions:A Pilot Study

Perlman, Adam I.; Lebow, David G.; Raphael, Karen; Ali, Ather; Simmons, Leigh Ann
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
35.5%
Concurrent use of dietary supplements with over-the-counter and prescription pharmaceuticals has become increasingly common, and with this trend, so has the incidence of adverse drug–supplement interactions. In the current market, consumers have no way to distinguish between safe and potentially harmful supplements. Thus, the primary objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that messages designed to increase consumers' awareness of potential health risks of concurrent use of dietary supplements with over-the-counter and prescription pharmaceuticals would promote further consideration and action, as evidenced by (a) seeking additional information from an authoritative source or qualified health care professional and (b) changing dietary supplement usage patterns. To test this hypothesis, an innovative consumer information delivery system, referred to as the Buyer Information Network (BuyIN), was utilized. BuyIN uses currently available, Web-enabled point-of-sale (POS) technology to provide up-to-date, evidence-based, health- and safety-related messages to consumers at the retail checkout counter. Results showed that more than one-fourth (27.1%) of consumers (n = 199) who purchased targeted items reported they were aware of the messages. Of this subgroup of aware consumers...

DataView: Border-Crossing Adjustment and Personal Health Care Spending by State

Basu, Joy
Fonte: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES Publicador: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //1996 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
125.5%
This article presents the results of a pioneering effort by the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) to measure interstate border crossing for services used by Medicare and non-Medicare beneficiaries. A major focus is to provide estimates of per capita expenditures by State for individual services. Such estimates are not possible without adjustment for interstate border-crossing flows. This is HCFA's first attempt to furnish a unified per capita personal health care expenditures data base comprising all services and covering total population. The study also analyzes interstate differences in expenditure flows by computing rates of inflow and outflow of expenditures, and highlights Medicare/non-Medicare flow differences.

Comprehension of Quality Care Indicators: Differences Among Privately Insured, Publicly Insured, and Uninsured

Jewett, Jacquelyn J.; Hibbard, Judith H.
Fonte: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES Publicador: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //1996 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
115.5%
This study explores consumers' comprehension of quality indicators appearing in health care report cards. Content analyses of focus group transcripts show differences in understanding individual quality indicators and among three populations: privately insured; Medicaid; and uninsured. Several rounds of coding and analysis assess: the degree of comprehension; what important ideas are not understood; and what exactly is not understood about the indicator (inter-rater reliability exceeded 94 percent). Thus, this study is an educational diagnosis of the comprehension of currently disseminated quality indicators. Fifteen focus groups (5 per insurance type) were conducted with a total of 104 participants. Findings show that consumers with differing access to and experiences with care have different levels of comprehension. Indicators are not well understood and are interpreted in unintended ways. Implications and strategies for communicating and disseminating quality information are discussed.

Role of Consumer Information in Today's Health Care System

Sangl, Judith A.; Wolf, Linda F.
Fonte: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES Publicador: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //1996 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
205.73%
This overview discusses articles published in this issue of the Health Care Financing Review, entitled “Consumer Information in a Changing Health Care System.” The overview describes several trends promoting more active consumer participation in health decisions and how consumer information facilitates that role. Major issues in developing consumer information are presented, stressing how orientation to consumer needs and use of social marketing techniques can yield improvement. The majority of the articles published in this issue of the Review discuss different aspects of information for choice of health plan, ranging from consumer perspectives on their information needs and their comprehension of quality indicators, to methods used for providing such information, such as direct counseling and comparative health plan performance data. The article concludes with thoughts on how we will know if we succeed in developing effective consumer health information.

Medicare Beneficiary Counseling Programs: What Are They and Do They Work?

McCormack, Lauren A.; Schnaier, Jenny A.; Lee, A. James; Garfinkel, Steven A.
Fonte: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES Publicador: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //1996 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
115.53%
Medicare beneficiaries face myriad rules, conditions, and exceptions under the Medicare program. As a result, State Information, Counseling, and Assistance (ICA) programs were established or enhanced with Federal funding as part of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA) of 1990. ICA programs utilize a volunteer-based and locally-sponsored support system to deliver free and unbiased counseling on the Medicare program and related health insurance issues. This article discusses the effectiveness of the ICA model. Because the ICA programs serve as a vital link between HCFA and its beneficiaries, information about the programs' success may be useful to HCFA and other policymakers during this era of consumer information.

HCFA's Consumer Information Commitment

McMullan, Michael
Fonte: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES Publicador: CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //1996 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
125.58%
This article provides examples of how the Health Care Financing Administration is providing Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries with information that will allow them to become more active participants in decisions affecting their health and well-being. The article emphasizes how HCFA has incorporated a beneficiary-centered focus and social marketing techniques in its consumer information activities. The work described in this article represents a cross section of the innovative and excellent work being done by staff throughout the Agency and by our partners and agents in meeting the information needs of beneficiaries.