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The impact of direct provision accommodation for asylum seekers on organisation and delivery of local primary care and social care services: a case study

Pieper, Hans-Olaf; Clerkin, Pauline; MacFarlane, Anne
Fonte: BioMed Central Publicador: BioMed Central
Tipo: info:eu-repo/semantics/article; all_ul_research; ul_published_reviewed
ENG
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peer-reviewed; Background: Many western countries have policies of dispersal and direct provision accommodation (state-funded accommodation in an institutional centre) for asylum seekers. Most research focuses on its effect on the asylum seeking population. Little is known about the impact of direct provision accommodation on organisation and delivery of local primary care and social care services in the community. The aim of this research is to explore this issue. Methods: In 2005 a direct provision accommodation centre was opened in a rural area in Ireland. A retrospective qualitative case study was designed comprising in-depth interviews with 37 relevant stakeholders. Thematic analysis following the principles of framework analysis was applied. Results: There was lack of advance notification to primary care and social care professionals and the community about the new accommodation centre. This caused anxiety and stress among relevant stakeholders. There was insufficient time to plan and prepare appropriate primary care and social care for the residents, causing a significant strain on service delivery. There was lack of clarity about how primary care and social care needs of the incoming residents were to be addressed. Interdisciplinary support systems developed informally between healthcare professionals. This ensured that residents of the accommodation centre were appropriately cared for. Conclusions: Direct provision accommodation impacts on the organisation and delivery of local primary care and social care services. There needs to be sufficient advance notification and inter-agency...

New perspectives in health care for older Americans (recommendations and policy directions of the Subcommittee on Health and Long-Term Care)

United States -- Congress. -- House. -- Select Committee on Aging. -- Subcommittee on Health and Long-Term Care
Fonte: U.S. Govt. Print. Off.; U.S. Govt. Print. Off. ( Washington ) Publicador: U.S. Govt. Print. Off.; U.S. Govt. Print. Off. ( Washington )
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: x, 92 p. : ; 24 cm.
Publicado em //1976 ENGLISH
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(Bibliography) Includes bibliographical references.; At head of title: Committee print.; (Statement of Responsibility) by the Subcommittee on Health and Long-Term Care of the Select Committee on Aging, House of Representatives, Ninety-fourth Congress, second session, January 1976.

Nursing home care in the United States : failure in public policy : supporting paper[s]

United States -- Congress. -- Senate. -- Special Committee on Aging. -- Subcommittee on Long-Term Care
Fonte: U.S. Govt. Print. Off.; U.S. Govt. Print. Off. ( Washington ) Publicador: U.S. Govt. Print. Off.; U.S. Govt. Print. Off. ( Washington )
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: v. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Publicado em //1974 ENGLISH
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(Bibliography) Includes bibliographical references.; Reports of 93d Congress, 2d session-94th Congress, 2d session, Senate.; Nos. 1-5 issued as Senate reports.; Reports of 93d Congress, 2d session-94th Congress, 2d session, enate.; Supporting papers nos. 4-5 issued as report nos. 94-00.; At head of title: Committee print.; (Statement of Responsibility) prepared by the Subcommittee on Long-Term Care of the Special Committee on Aging, United States Senate.

Tantalus and the Tyranny of Territory: Pursuing the dream of parity in rural and metropolitan population health outcomes through effective primary health care programmes

Harvey, P.
Fonte: Australian Journal Primary Health, Australian Institute Primary Care & School Public Health Publicador: Australian Journal Primary Health, Australian Institute Primary Care & School Public Health
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2004 EN
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Many health professionals and rural health academics are motivated by the challenge of achieving equitable access to health care in rural communities with the implicit vision that fairer access to services might ultimately lead to more equitable health outcomes for people living in rural and remote settings. The purpose of this paper is to put the issue of rural and urban health outcome parity into perspective and assess recent progress towards achieving the ultimate goal of improving rural health status. I will also explore ways in which rural communities might increase their access to and use of primary health care revenue in the future to improve community health outcomes. While some improvements have been achieved across the rural health system in recent times, the fundamental problem of maintaining infrastructure to service community needs in rural areas remains as daunting as ever. Extensive evidence has now been assembled to show that rural people generally enjoy a much lower standard of health care, health outcomes and life expectancy than their urban cousins. The question underlying all of this evidence, however, is... must this always be so? Is it possible to redress the current inequities between rural and urban populations and could new primary health care initiatives...

Outcomes of patients admitted to tertiary intensive care units after interhospital transfer: comparison with patients admitted from emergency departments.

Flabouris, A.; Hart, G.; George, C.
Fonte: Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine Publicador: Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2008 EN
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OBJECTIVES: To compare outcomes of patients admitted to tertiary-level intensive care units after interhospital transfer (IHT) with those of similar patients admitted from the emergency department (ED). DESIGN: Historical case-control study using data from the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Adult Patient Database (ANZICS APD), a quality-assurance dataset. PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING: 28882 patients aged 16 years or older admitted to an adult tertiary ICU in Australia or New Zealand between 1 January 1994 and 31 December 2003 with one of the eight most common diagnoses for IHT patients. Patients admitted directly to the ICU from another hospital (DIHT group) (n=9203) were matched by age, sex, APACHE II score and diagnosis with non-IHT patients admitted from the ED (ED group). RESULTS: Hospital mortality was higher in the DIHT group than in the ED group for patients with a diagnosis of multiple trauma (11.0% v 5.1%; odds ratio [OR], 2.3; 95% CI, 1.6- 3.34), respiratory infection (28.1% v 19.1%; OR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.34-2.05), sepsis (38.7% v 28.7%; OR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.34-1.83), intracranial haemorrhage (49.9% v 42.6%; OR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.14-1.58), head injury alone (16.9% v 13.7%; OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.01-1.62), and cardiac arrest (59.3% v 53.2%; OR...

Observational study of patients admitted to intensive care units in Australia and New Zealand after interhospital transfer.

Flabouris, A.; Hart, G.; George, C.
Fonte: Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine Publicador: Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2008 EN
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46.07%
OBJECTIVE: To describe the demographics, illness categories and outcomes of adult intensive care unit patients who underwent interhospital transfer (IHT). DESIGN: Retrospective review of data from the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Adult Patient Database (ANZICS APD), a binational intensive-care quality-assurance dataset. PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING: 332 009 patients from 125 Australian and New Zealand adult ICUs, who were aged 16 years or older, and had a known hospital and ICU source of admission between 1 January 1994 and 31 December 2003. RESULTS: Tertiary ICUs contributed 47.9% of patients, metropolitan 20.9%, private 16.7% and rural/regional 14.5%. Patients admitted to an ICU after IHT had more severe illness, longer hospital stay, and a higher intubation rate, mortality and rate of discharge to another hospital. Over 10 years, the proportion of IHTs increased for rural/regional (R2=0.639; P=0.006) and tertiary (R2=0.703; P=0.002) hospitals, and for the diagnoses of sepsis (R2=0.877; P<0.001) and respiratory infection (R2=0.679, P=0.003); decreased for trauma (R2=0.612; P=0.007); and was associated with fewer ICU admissions after elective surgery (Beta=-1.47; 95% CI, -2.19 to -0.74; P<0.001) and from the operating theatre (Beta=-0.78; 95% CI...

Improving coordination of care for Aboriginal people with mental health, alcohol and drug use problems: progress report on an ongoing collaborative action research project

Kowanko, I.; de Crespigny, C.; Murray, H.; Ah Kit, J.; Prideaux, C.; Miller, H.; Mills, D.; Emden, C.
Fonte: Australian Journal Primary Health, Australian Institute Primary Care & School Public Health Publicador: Australian Journal Primary Health, Australian Institute Primary Care & School Public Health
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2009 EN
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This paper outlines the background and progress to date of a project to improve the coordination of care for Aboriginal people with mental health and/or alcohol and other drug problems living in the Eyre Peninsula region of South Australia. The project responds to recommendations from previous research by this team in this area, and has been running since 2004. Working with a wide range of health and human service providers, we explored issues that improve or hinder coordination of care and identified useful strategies. Some of these have already been implemented through the project: e.g. interagency cross-disciplinary training in response to shared needs, and lobbying for afterhours telephone help. Other strategies are still in progress: e.g. implementing a uniform triage and referral system and improving information sharing within Port Lincoln Aboriginal Health Service. The paper reflects on our experience of conducting Aboriginal health service research using a participatory action oriented approach, and discusses the challenges in providing effective and well coordinated rural and remote mental health/alcohol and other drug care in the context of complex health and social needs of Aboriginal people.; Inge Kowanko, Charlotte de Crespigny...

South Australian Divisions of General Practice supporting diabetes care: insights from reporting data

Moretti, C.; Kalucy, E.; Hordacre, A.; Howard, S.
Fonte: Australian Journal Primary Health, Australian Institute Primary Care & School Public Health Publicador: Australian Journal Primary Health, Australian Institute Primary Care & School Public Health
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2010 EN
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The study used public reporting data supplied by the South Australian Divisions of General Practice to examine their role and significance in supporting diabetes care in general practice. Data sources included the Annual Survey of Divisions 2002–07, and Divisions 12-month reports against National Performance Indicators for 2006–07. Results showed that Divisions combine collaboration, practice support and GP education approaches to support optimal diabetes care within general practice. Divisions commonly described their collaborative achievements in terms of connecting general practice with other diabetes providers, services, information and resources. Practice support and educational activities, which were highly interrelated, often focussed on strengthening use of chronic disease Medical Benefit Schedule items, practice nurse roles and computer and information management systems. In this way, Divisions strengthened primary care team functioning to achieve good communication and consistent standards of care between team members. Divisions detailed a range of strategies that worked well in delivering these practice-level outcomes, with implications for wider Network learning and development. These publicly available data sources provide scope for decision makers and researchers to explore other aspects of Divisions’ roles and performance.; Cecilia Moretti...

End points for Phase II trials in intensive care: recommendations from the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Group consensus panel meeting

Young, P.; Hodgson, C.; Dulhunty, J.; Saxena, M.; Bailey, M.; Bellomo, R.; Davies, A.; Finfer, S.; Kruger, P.; Lipman, J.; Myburgh, J.; Peake, S.; Seppelt, I.; Streat, S.; Tate, R.; Webb, S.
Fonte: Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine Publicador: Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2012 EN
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BACKGROUND: There is uncertainty about which end points should be used for Phase II trials in critically ill patients. OBJECTIVE: To systematically evaluate potential end points for Phase II trials in critically ill patients. DESIGN AND SETTING: A report outlining a process of literature review and recommendations from a consensus meeting conducted on behalf of the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Clinical Trials Group (ANZICS CTG) in October 2011. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The consensus panel concluded that there are no adequately validated end points for Phase II trials in critically ill patients. However, the following were identified as potential Phase II end points: hospital-free days to Day 90, ICU-free days to Day 28, ventilator-free days to Day 28, cardiovascular support-free days to Day 28, and renal replacement therapy-free days to Day 28. We recommend that these end points be evaluated further.; Paul Young, Carol Hodgson, Joel Dulhunty, Manoj Saxena, Michael Bailey, Rinaldo Bellomo, Andrew Davies, Simon Finfer, Peter Kruger, Jeffrey Lipman, John Myburgh, Sandra Peake, Ian Seppelt, Stephen Streat, Rhiannon Tate, Steven Webb and the ANZICS Clinical Trials Group

Identifying unusual performance in Australian and New Zealand intensive care units from 2000 to 2010

Solomon, P.J.; Kasza, J.; Moran, J.L.; Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society (ANZICS) Centre for Outcome and Resource Evaluation (CORE)
Fonte: BioMed Central Publicador: BioMed Central
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2014 EN
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BACKGROUND: The Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society (ANZICS) Adult Patient Database (APD) collects voluntary data on patient admissions to Australian and New Zealand intensive care units (ICUs). This paper presents an in-depth statistical analysis of risk-adjusted mortality of ICU admissions from 2000 to 2010 for the purpose of identifying ICUs with unusual performance. METHODS: A cohort of 523,462 patients from 144 ICUs was analysed. For each ICU, the natural logarithm of the standardised mortality ratio (log-SMR) was estimated from a risk-adjusted, three-level hierarchical model. This is the first time a three-level model has been fitted to such a large ICU database anywhere. The analysis was conducted in three stages which included the estimation of a null distribution to describe usual ICU performance. Log-SMRs with appropriate estimates of standard errors are presented in a funnel plot using 5% false discovery rate thresholds. False coverage-statement rate confidence intervals are also presented. The observed numbers of deaths for ICUs identified as unusual are compared to the predicted true worst numbers of deaths under the model for usual ICU performance. RESULTS: Seven ICUs were identified as performing unusually over the period 2000 to 2010...

Patients admitted to Australian intensive care units: impact of remoteness and distance travelled on patient outcome

Flabouris, A.; Hart, G.; Nicholls, A.
Fonte: Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine Publicador: Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2012 EN
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OBJECTIVE: To use a geographical information system (GIS) to explore the impact of (i) patient remoteness and (ii) distance travelled to an Australian public-hospital intensive care unit on patient outcomes. DESIGN, SETTING AND SUBJECTS: We conducted a retrospective study over the period 2002-2008 linking intensive care unit resource and clinical datasets with Australian population postcode data and using a GIS for analysis. Data from the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Centre for Outcome and Resource Evaluation (ANZICS CORE) critical care resources survey (2007), the ANZICS CORE adult patient database (2002- 2008) and the Australian Bureau of Statistics were used. Only public-hospital ICUs were included in the study. Classification of remoteness was based on the extended version of the Accessibility/Remoteness Index of Australia (ARIA+). Distance was the distance between centroids of the patient's residential postcode and the postcode of the area in which the admitting ICU was located. ICU admissions were divided into three categories: "direct other-hospital ICU admission" (patient transferred directly from another hospital), "indirect other-hospital ICU admission" (patient admitted from a ward, emergency department or operating room after being transferred from another hospital) or "home ICU admission" (patient not transferred from another hospital). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Hospital mortality. RESULTS: There were 218 709 ICU admissions to 76 Australian public hospital ICUs. Of these admissions...

Direct and delayed admission to an intensive care or high dependency unit following discharge from the emergency department: associated patient characteristics and hospital outcomes

Flabouris, A.; Jeyadoss, J.; Field, J.; Soulsby, T.
Fonte: Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine Publicador: Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2012 EN
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OBJECTIVE: To compare patients admitted from the emergency department (ED) directly to a ward (EDWard), the intensive care unit (EDICU) or stepdown (high dependency) unit (EDSDU) with patients admitted via the ED, but whose admission to an ICU (EDWardICU) or SDU (EDWardSDU) was preceded by a ward stay. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Administrative and clinical data linkage; 650-bed, tertiary referral hospital, whose ED has about 60 000 patient presentations per annum; adult patients admitted via the ED to a ward, ICU or SDU and whose ED length of stay (LOS) was < 24 h. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Hospital outcome and stay. Results: From January 2004 to December 2007, there were 43 484 patients, of whom 40 609 (93.4%) were EDWard, 1020 (2.3%) were EDICU, 873 (2.0%) were EDSDU, 503 (1.2%) were EDWardSDU, and 479 (1.1%) were EDWardICU. Hospital mortality for EDWardICU patients exceeded that of EDICU patients (34.9% v 23.3%; P < 0.01), as did EDWardSDU exceed EDSDU (12.3% v 7.8%; P < 0.01). Median ward stay for EDWardICU patients was 47 h 37min (IQR, 14 h 48min – 131 h 53min) and for EDWardSDU patients, 46 h 18min (IQR, 18h 28 min – 140h 12 min) (P=0.75). Compared with patients admitted to the ICU from the operating theatre, EDWardICU patients had a longer median ward stay (58 h 35min v 34 h 36min; P = 0.03) and hospital mortality (42.8% v 20.2%; P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Patients discharged from the ED to a general ward and subsequently to an ICU or SDU had a mortality that exceeded that of ED patients admitted directly to the ICU or SDU. Further investigations are warranted to explain this excess mortality and ascertain the extent of potential preventability.; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22963213; Arthas Flabouris...

Medical reviews before cardiac arrest, medical emergency call or unanticipated intensive care unit admission: their nature and impact on patient outcome

Trinkle, R.; Flabouris, A.
Fonte: Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine Publicador: Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2011 EN
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Objective: To measure and describe the extent and consequences of documented medical patient reviews in the 24 hours before a cardiac arrest, medical emergency team (MET) call or an unanticipated intensive care unit admission ('event'), and the use of such reviews as a rapid response system performance measure. Design: Retrospective case-note and database review. Setting: Tertiary referral hospital, April-September, 2008. Participants: Adult inpatients who had an event and a preceding hospital length of stay > 24 hours. Main outcome measures: Hospital discharge status, ICU length of stay, not-for-resuscitation order. Results: 443 patients had 575 events (6.1% cardiac arrests, 68.7% MET calls, 25.2% ICU admissions) in the study period. A documented medical review preceded 561 (97.6%) events. Patients whose review was a home team review (HTR; ie, from a general ward) only were older than those with a critical care review (CCR) (70.2 v 63.6 years; P < 0.01). A critical care discharge (CCD) or CCR preceded 39.5% and HTR only, 57.9% of events. A CCD preceded 25.7% of cardiac arrests, 32.4% of MET calls, and 29.0% unanticipated ICU admissions. Patients with a CCR or CCD had lower hospital mortality than those with an HTR only (27.3% v 41.7%; P < 0.01)...

Enteral nutrition in Australian and New Zealand intensive care units: a point-prevalence study of prescription practices

Peake, S.; Chapman, M.; Davies, A.; Moran, J.; O'Connor, S.; Ridley, E.; Williams, P.
Fonte: Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine Publicador: Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2012 EN
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46.01%
BACKGROUND: Enteral nutrition (EN) is widely accepted as the preferred method for providing nutrition therapy to critically ill patients. However, optimal energy goals and the best way to achieve those goals are ill defined. OBJECTIVE: To determine the type and energy concentration of commonly prescribed EN formulations and whether energy-dense formulations (> 1 kcal/mL) are used. DESIGN: Prospective, observational, multicentre, single-day, point-prevalence study. PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING: All patients present in 38 Australian and New Zealand intensive care units at 10:00 on 17 November 2010. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Demographic data, admission diagnosis and information on EN administration were collected. RESULTS: 522 patients were enrolled. Mean age was 58.7(SD, 17.3) years, 65% were male and 79% were mechanically ventilated. On study day, 220/522 patients received EN (43%; 95% CI, 39%–48%). ICU admission source, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation APACHE) III diagnostic category, APACHE II score and ventilation on study day predicted receipt of EN. Of those receiving EN, 111/220 (51%; 95% CI, 44%–57%) received a 1 kcal/mL formulation and the remainder received an energy-dense formulation — 2 kcal/mL, 39/220 (18%; 95% CI...

Building on Values: Report of the Commission on the Future of Health Care in Canada [Reports]

Commission on the Future of Health Care in Canada; Romanow, Roy
Fonte: Saskatoon: Commission on the Future of Health Care in Canada Publicador: Saskatoon: Commission on the Future of Health Care in Canada
EN
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56.01%
In April 2001, the Prime Minister established the Commission on the Future of Health Care in Canada. The mandate of the Commission was to review medicare, engage Canadians in a national dialogue on its future, and make recommendations to enhance the system's quality and sustainability.; Paper copy - CA1 Z1 2001F0 Stauffer Library - Documents

Building on Values: Report of the Commission on the Future of Health Care in Canada [Discussion Papers]

Commission on the Future of Health Care in Canada; Romanow, Roy
Fonte: Saskatoon: Commission on the Future of Health Care in Canada Publicador: Saskatoon: Commission on the Future of Health Care in Canada
EN
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56.01%
In April 2001, the Prime Minister established the Commission on the Future of Health Care in Canada. The mandate of the Commission was to review medicare, engage Canadians in a national dialogue on its future, and make recommendations to enhance the system's quality and sustainability.; Paper copy - CA1 Z1 2001F0 Stauffer Library - Documents

Effecting change in primary care management of respiratory conditions : a global scoping exercise and literature review of educational interventions to inform the IPCRG's E-Quality initiative

McDonnel, Juliet; Williams, Sian; Chavannes, Niels H.; Sousa, Jaime Correira de; Fardy, H. John; Fletcher, Monica; Stout, James; Tomlins, Ron; Yusuf, Osman M.; Pinnock, Hilary
Fonte: Primary Care Respiratory Society Publicador: Primary Care Respiratory Society
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2012 ENG
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This discussion paper describes a scoping exercise and literature review commissioned by the International Primary Care Respiratory Group (IPCRG) to inform their E-Quality programme which seeks to support small-scale educational projects to improve respiratory management in primary care. Our narrative review synthesises information from three sources: publications concerning the global context and health systems development; a literature search of Medline, CINAHL and Cochrane databases; and a series of eight interviews conducted with members of the IPCRG faculty. Educational interventions sit within complex healthcare, economic, and policy contexts. It is essential that any development project considers the local circumstances in terms of economic resources, political circumstances, organisation and administrative capacities, as well as the specific quality issue to be addressed. There is limited evidence (in terms of changed clinician behaviour and/or improved health outcomes) regarding the merits of different educational and quality improvement approaches. Features of educational interventions that were most likely to show some evidence of effectiveness included being carefully designed, multifaceted, engaged health professionals in their learning...

The development and evaluation of a palliative care admission assessment tool

O'Reilly, Martina
Fonte: University of Limerick Publicador: University of Limerick
Tipo: info:eu-repo/semantics/doctoralThesis; all_ul_research; ul_published_reviewed; ul_theses_dissertations
ENG
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46.12%
peer-reviewed; Effective palliative care intervention is contingent upon a comprehensive multidimensional assessment of the patient’s experience of illness. Assessment in palliative care settings must be focused, sensitive, specific and effective in order to minimise discomfort to vulnerable and often highly morbid patients. Optimal assessment can be facilitated by careful choice of tools that allow systematic standardised assessment, are feasible within clinical practice and acceptable to patients. The aim of this research was the development and testing of evidence based, multidisciplinary, specialist palliative care assessment; accompanying guidelines and training package (the intervention). The tools included in the admission assessment were chosen further to extensive literature review. Mixed methods were utilised to facilitate a comprehensive evaluation pre and post-intervention to test the effectiveness, feasibility and acceptability of the intervention in a busy clinical environment. Results demonstrated an increase in evidence of assessment across the palliative care domains and in particular in relation to assessment of the patient’s psychosocial distress and assessment of carer’s needs. Post-intervention increased concordance of outcome of clinical assessment with the patients self-rating of pain...

STOMA CARE - SISTEMATIC LITERATURE REVIEW

Almeida, Carla Ribeiro; Intensive Care Postgraduate, Fluminense Federal University, RJ, Brazil; Cruz, Isabel CF da; Professional nursing master Professional
Fonte: Universidade Federal Fluminense Publicador: Universidade Federal Fluminense
Tipo: Peer-reviewed Article; sistematic Literature Review Formato: text/html
Publicado em 29/07/2011 PT
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Stoma or ostomy it´s all surgery done to create an opening in any organ and can be temporary or permanent. The Nurses it´s very importante to care of this patient , since your work involves the surgery (before, during and after), providing health education through the rehabilitation process toward the selfcare. This is a computerized literature search held in electronic databases in order to answer the clinical question flaming: in the critical patient, which is the effective stoma care in a patient with colorectal fistulas? 10 articles were selected for analysis, these met the inclusion criteria of this study, then their results were discussed, some implications in clinical practice of nurses caring for patients with high complexity.

Initial consultation on SSCR research themes: analysis of responses. Report commissioned from Ann Richardson by the NIHR School for Social Care Research

NIHR School for Social Care Research, .
Fonte: NIHR School for Social Care Research, London School of Economics and Political Science Publicador: NIHR School for Social Care Research, London School of Economics and Political Science
Tipo: Monograph; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /06/2010 EN; EN
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The School for Social Care Research (SSCR) was set up by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)1 to develop the evidence base for adult social care practice in England by commissioning and conducting research. It was launched in May 2009, with a budget of £15 million over five years. Open to new ideas and suggestions, we actively sought to consult the practitioner communities, the wider public, users of social care services and carers about key social care practice issues SSCR should address through our research to inform our developing research agenda. This report sets out the responses from this exercise up to February 2010. The principal means of consultation was on-line. We put out a general call for ideas on the SSCR website, with an invitation to anyone with an interest in social care to complete a short form suggesting topics for consideration. In all, 41 individuals and organisations submitted 121 topics through this process. In addition, we invited suggestions through a number of meetings, including the SSCR Advisory Board, the SSCR User, Carer, Practitioner Reference Group, a joint meeting between Making Research Count and directors and senior managers of adult social care services, and through emails directly to SSCR contacts...