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How does product market structure influence financial structure and bankruptcy risk?

Costa, Magali Pedro
Fonte: Universidade de Évora Publicador: Universidade de Évora
Tipo: Dissertação de Mestrado
ENG
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.23%
The decision-making process is crucial to the success or failure of an organization. We can analyze financial decisions (particularly decisions regarding capital structure) and/or operational decisions (quantities and prices to be charged). These decisions are influenced by the dynamic economic and competitive environment in which firms live. The dissertation aims, using a game theoretical framework, to examine how market structure influences financial and product market decisions and consequently the bankruptcy risk .It analyzes the impact of changes at the level of demand uncertainty, in the degree of product differentiation and the asymmetry in marginal production costs on the risk of bankruptcy. The analysis is performed assuming a duopoly market where there is uncertainty in demand and where firms compete in quantities; ### Resumo: O processo de tomada de decisão é crucial para o sucesso ou insucesso de uma organização. Pode-se falar em decisões financeiras (particularmente decisões quanto à estrutura de capital) e/ou em decisões operacionais (quantidades e preços ótimos a praticar). Estas decisões são influenciadas pelo contexto económico e concorrencial dinâmico em que as empresas vivem. Esta dissertação pretende...

Bankruptcy risk model and empirical tests

Podobnik, Boris; Horvatic, Davor; Petersen, Alexander M.; Urošević, Branko; Stanley, H. Eugene
Fonte: National Academy of Sciences Publicador: National Academy of Sciences
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.31%
We analyze the size dependence and temporal stability of firm bankruptcy risk in the US economy by applying Zipf scaling techniques. We focus on a single risk factor—the debt-to-asset ratio R—in order to study the stability of the Zipf distribution of R over time. We find that the Zipf exponent increases during market crashes, implying that firms go bankrupt with larger values of R. Based on the Zipf analysis, we employ Bayes’s theorem and relate the conditional probability that a bankrupt firm has a ratio R with the conditional probability of bankruptcy for a firm with a given R value. For 2,737 bankrupt firms, we demonstrate size dependence in assets change during the bankruptcy proceedings. Prepetition firm assets and petition firm assets follow Zipf distributions but with different exponents, meaning that firms with smaller assets adjust their assets more than firms with larger assets during the bankruptcy process. We compare bankrupt firms with nonbankrupt firms by analyzing the assets and liabilities of two large subsets of the US economy: 2,545 Nasdaq members and 1,680 New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) members. We find that both assets and liabilities follow a Pareto distribution. The finding is not a trivial consequence of the Zipf scaling relationship of firm size quantified by employees—although the market capitalization of Nasdaq stocks follows a Pareto distribution...

“No Way Out” : The Lack of Efficient Insolvency Regimes in the MENA Region

Uttamchandani, Mahesh
Fonte: Banco Mundial Publicador: Banco Mundial
Relevância na Pesquisa
26.64%
This paper provides a comparative summary of the payout phase of insolvency systems in the MENA Region. Countries in the region generally have weaker restructuring and liquidation systems than those in most other regions. The paper summarizes many of the weaknesses common across the region.

The Challenges of Bankruptcy Reform

Cirmizi, Elena; Klapper, Leora; Uttamchandani, Mahesh
Fonte: Banco Mundial Publicador: Banco Mundial
Relevância na Pesquisa
56.66%
The 2008 financial crisis was followed by a global economic downturn, credit crunch, and reduction in cross-border lending, trade finance, remittances, and foreign direct investment, which adversely affected businesses around the world. The consequent increase in the number of firm insolvencies in the financial and corporate sectors highlights the importance of efficient bankruptcy laws. This paper summarizes the theoretical and empirical literature on bankruptcy design, discusses the challenges of introducing and implementing bankruptcy reforms, and presents examples of how policymakers are trying to use the current economic downturn as an opportunity to engage in meaningful reform of the bankruptcy process.

Do Reorganization Costs Matter for Efficiency? Evidence from a Bankruptcy Reform in Colombia

Gine, Xavier; Love, Inessa
Fonte: Banco Mundial Publicador: Banco Mundial
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.43%
An efficient bankruptcy system should liquidate nonviable businesses and reorganize viable ones. The importance of this filtering process has long been recognized in the literature; the typical reason advanced for its failure has been biases (in codes or among judges). In this paper we show that bankruptcy costs can be another source of such filtering failure. We illustrate this with the Colombian reform of 1999. Using data from 1,924 firms filing for bankruptcy between 1996 and 2003, we find that the prereform reorganization proceedings were so inefficient that the bankruptcy system failed to separate economically viable firms from inefficient ones. In contrast, by streamlining the reorganization process, the reform contributed to the improvement of the selection of viable firms into reorganization. In this sense, the new law increased the efficiency of the bankruptcy system in Colombia.

Evaluating the efficiency of a bankruptcy reform

Gine, Xavier; Love, Inessa
Fonte: World Bank, Washington, DC Publicador: World Bank, Washington, DC
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.55%
The current financial crisis has pushed many firms to the brink of bankruptcy. A key policy question is thus whether bankruptcy laws are efficient, in the sense of allowing better firms to reorganize while liquidating unviable firms. The sixth in impact series presents lessons from a reform in Colombia that achieved this objective.

Pakistan - Strengthening the Insolvency Regime : Non-Lending Technical Assistance Final Report

World Bank
Fonte: Washington, DC Publicador: Washington, DC
EN_US
Relevância na Pesquisa
26.57%
The importance of a modern, binding and effective insolvency regime is undeniable. Nearly 90 countries around the world have reformed their bankruptcy codes since Second World War, and over half of them have done so during the last decade. One of the key aspects in the reform process is the delicate balance addressed by a modern insolvency system which encourages the organization of viable firms and liquidates unviable firms. The financial and macroeconomic crises, as recently experienced in Pakistan, provide an opportunity for bankruptcy reform, as the potential employment impact often places the issue of insolvent companies high on the policy agenda. The three fundamental goals of any insolvency law are: 1) transparency, including a system for publicizing and indexing judgments, an accessible method for registering securing interest and an effective notice of insolvency proceedings, 2) predictability - in terms of being fair, simple and clear, which if not achieved ends up costing more as financial institutions compensate the uncertainty with additional credit costs; and 3) efficiency...

Lithuania : Banking System Assessment

World Bank
Fonte: Washington, DC Publicador: Washington, DC
EN_US
Relevância na Pesquisa
26.53%
The Bank of Lithuania (BoL), the Central Bank, was established in 1990. BoL has the exclusive right to grant and revoke licenses to local and foreign banks and to supervise their activities. Private commercial banking boomed from 1991 to 1994 while bank regulation was lax. In late 1995, a bank crisis caused failures of most of the Lithuanian banks, and the remaining banks resulted in better managed and supervised institutions. BoL also applied tougher regulation on the banking sector. All commercial banks now need to have their financial records audited every year by an international auditing firm. This report includes the following headings: risks and contingency crisis management in the Lithuanian banking system; credit risk and regulatory issues; and description of corporate debt restructuring procedures in Lithuania.

Croatia : A Strategy for Smart, Sustainable and Inclusive Growth

Madzarevic-Sujster, Sanja
Fonte: World Bank, Washington, DC Publicador: World Bank, Washington, DC
EN_US
Relevância na Pesquisa
46.24%
Croatia`s current economic challenges include sluggish growth, excessive public spending, high unemployment, and a deteriorating external environment. Croatian economy was making a fragile recovery and dealing with slow export growth, low investment, and persistent unemployment. At the end of 2011, Croatia gross domestic product (GDP) per capita (in purchasing power terms) declined to 61 percent average, a loss of 2 percentage points since 2008.The country incomplete structural reform agenda needs attention and action to promote greater competitiveness and a shift to productivity-based, private sector-led growth. It also faces the strategic challenge of maximizing the benefits of European Union (EU) membership, especially in terms of access to markets and the use of EU structural funds, requiring structural changes in the social sectors, education system, and business environment. Accelerating economic recovery requires Croatia to complete its currently unfinished structural reform agenda and shift to productivity-based...

The Challenges of Bankruptcy Reform

Cirmizi, Elena; Klapper, Leora; Uttamchandani, Mahesh
Fonte: Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the World Bank Publicador: Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the World Bank
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN_US
Relevância na Pesquisa
56.52%
The 2008 financial crisis was followed by a global economic downturn, a credit crunch, and a reduction in cross-border lending, trade finance, and foreign direct investment, which adversely affected businesses around the world. The consequent increase in the number of firm insolvencies in the corporate sector highlights the need for commercial bankruptcy laws to liquidate efficiently unviable firms and reorganize viable ones, so as to maximize the total value of proceeds received by creditors, shareholders, employees, and other stakeholders. The authors summarize the theoretical and empirical literature on bankruptcy design, discuss the challenges of introducing and implementing bankruptcy reforms, and present examples of how policymakers are trying to take advantage of the current economic downturn as an opportunity to engage in meaningful reform of the bankruptcy process. They also review the main principles of efficient insolvency laws and bankruptcy procedures.

OED Review of the Poverty Reduction Strategy Process : Albania Case Study

Operations Evaluation Department
Fonte: World Bank, Washington, DC Publicador: World Bank, Washington, DC
EN_US
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.24%
This report analyzes the experience of Albania with the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) process. The focus of the report is on evaluating the performance of the World Bank in supporting the PRSP initiative, not on appraising the authorities policies. The main emphasis of the report is on the formulation and implementation of the PRSP until March 2003, but it does cover elements of the PRSP Progress Report which was completed following the evaluation team s mission to Albania. The report is structured as follows: Section B describes the country context including, political and economic background, the poverty profile, and key constraints for development. Section C addresses the PRS Process in its entirety and includes an assessment of the relevance of the PRSP for Albania and its consistency with the underlying principles of the initiative. Section D assesses the World Bank s support to the process. Finally, section E summarizes the main points of the assessment and attempts to draw lessons of more general applicability.

No More Ping-Pong: The Need for Article III Status in Bankruptcy After Stern v. Marshall

Brown, Latoya C.
Fonte: SelectedWorks Publicador: SelectedWorks
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.56%
“Unfortunately, Stern v. Marshall has become the mantra of every litigant who, for strategic or tactical reasons, would rather litigate somewhere other than the bankruptcy court.” I. INTRODUCTION Quite aptly, the United States Supreme Court borrowed the words of Charles Dickens to describe the life of the case that ultimately resulted in Stern v. Marshall : “This suit has, in the curse of time, become so complicated, that . . . no two . . . lawyers can talk about it for five minutes, without coming to a total disagreement as to all the premises.’” Ironically, even after the Court’s decision, the “curse” has continued and many, especially those of the bankruptcy bar, are in disagreement as to the ultimate outcome and unforeseen consequences of Stern. The “big fuss” arose out of the Court’s holding that bankruptcy courts do not have constitutional authority to enter final judgment on a state law counterclaim “that is not resolved in the process of ruling on a creditor’s proof of claim.” The Court stated that common law claims, as well as suits in equity and admiralty, fall within the province of Article III courts, and Congress cannot “chip away at the authority of the judicial branch” by enacting statutes delegating such power to non-Article III judges. The Constitution grants judicial power to courts whose judges enjoy tenure during good behavior and salary protections. Article III provisions are safeguards against intrusion by other branches of government and they ensure that judicial decisions are being made with “[c]lear heads . . . and honest hearts.” A different outcome would have been likely if the case involved a ‘public right’ because the Court has recognized that Congress has the authority to adjudicate in suits involving that exception. The public rights exception applies in cases where a “right is integrally related to particular federal government action.” Other than the obvious limiting effect that Stern will have on bankruptcy courts with regards to adjudicating common law claims...

Consumer Bankruptcy in Europe Different Paths for Debtors and Creditors

ANDERSON, Robert; DUBOIS, Hans; KOARK, Anne; LECHNER, Götz; RAMSAY, Iain; ROETHE, Thomas
Fonte: Instituto Universitário Europeu Publicador: Instituto Universitário Europeu
Tipo: Trabalho em Andamento Formato: application/pdf; digital
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.16%
The economic crisis has fuelled the debate on regulated state insolvencies. And while debt relief is being considered for nations, in some European countries consumers live their whole lives in debt as there is no consumer bankruptcy process which provides for an exemption from residual debt. There are thus no uniform regulations on how private individuals can make a clean financial start in Europe and debtors and creditors have different roads to take. The standard moral debate on consumer bankruptcy proceedings ranges between two extremes, i.e. from attaching individual blame for debt to expropriation of creditors.

Insolvency institutions and efficiency

García-Posada, Miguel
Fonte: Universidade Carlos III de Madrid Publicador: Universidade Carlos III de Madrid
Tipo: Trabalho em Andamento
Publicado em 19/06/2015 ENG
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.38%
While there is a vast literature on optimal bankruptcy laws and, specifically, on the optimal allocation of control rights between debtors and creditors in corporate bankruptcy, little has been said about the role that alternative insolvency institutions may play in the design of the optimal insolvency framework. This paper attempts to fill this gap by modelling two insolvency institutions -a bankruptcy system and a foreclosure system- that firms and their creditors may use when dealing with financial distress. Firms choose between one or the other based on lenders’ willingness to provide credit and the trade-off between two inefficiency costs, those from inefficient liquidations and those from productive inefficiencies caused by overinvestment in capital assets. The model’s key result is that welfare is a non-monotonic function of creditor control rights in bankruptcy, implying that a perfectly “creditor-friendly” bankruptcy code (a code that always grants control of the distressed firms to creditors) is very inefficient. A second result is that welfare is higher when the bankruptcy system is too “creditor-friendly” (i.e., it ensures the provision of credit, but generates too many inefficient liquidations) than when it is too “debtor-friendly”. Hence...

Is the different treatment of corporate insolvency and personal bankruptcy under Australian law justified?

Brownbill, Conan
Fonte: Universidade Nacional da Austrália Publicador: Universidade Nacional da Austrália
Tipo: Relatório
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.58%
The Australian corporate insolvency and personal bankruptcy regimes are separate. In recent ears, it has been suggested the two procedures should be merged. Those favouring merger believe it would increase efficiencies, reduce existing overlap and lessen costs. The benefits of a single insolvency regulator are noted as one particular benefit of merged insolvency legislation. Such arguments in support of merger underestimate the difficulties associated with unification given the tradition of separate insolvency laws within Australia and the terms of the Constitution. Significant costs would be associated with merging insolvency and bankruptcy legislation and the reduction of two governmental insolvency regulators to one. The Commonwealth may be unable o enact merged insolvency legislation that included all existing insolvency provisions given limitations within the Constitution. These limitations do not appear to have been addressed by those arguing in favour of merged insolvency procedures. The corporate insolvency and personal bankruptcy procedures have similar objectives and procedures. Both provide for the appointment of an independent entity to ascertain the debtor's abilities, realise their assets and distribute the proceeds among creditors. Further...

The Chrysler Effect : The Impact of the Chrysler Bailout on Borrowing Costs

Anginer, Deniz; Warburton, A. Joseph
Fonte: Banco Mundial Publicador: Banco Mundial
Tipo: Publications & Research :: Policy Research Working Paper
ENGLISH
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.54%
Did the U.S. government's intervention in the Chrysler reorganization overturn bankruptcy law? Critics argue that the government-sponsored reorganization impermissibly elevated claims of the auto union over those of Chrysler's other creditors. If the critics are correct, businesses might suffer an increase in their cost of debt because creditors will perceive a new risk, that organized labor might leap-frog them in bankruptcy. This paper examines the financial market where this effect would be most detectible, the market for bonds of highly unionized companies. The authors find no evidence of a negative reaction to the Chrysler bailout by bondholders of unionized firms. They thus reject the notion that investors perceived a distortion of bankruptcy priorities. To the contrary, bondholders of unionized firms reacted positively to the Chrysler bailout. This evidence suggests that bondholders interpreted the Chrysler bailout as a signal that the government will stand behind unionized firms. The results are consistent with the notion that too-big-to-fail government policies generate moral hazard in the credit markets.

Bankruptcy Reform-Breaking the Court Logjam in Colombia

Atiyas, Izak
Fonte: World Bank, Washington, DC Publicador: World Bank, Washington, DC
Tipo: Publications & Research :: Viewpoint; Publications & Research
ENGLISH
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.46%
Many developing countries suffer from logjam in the courts, a condition that tends to reduce the effectiveness of bankruptcy law in relieving financial distress. Colombia's bankruptcy reform provides some useful lessons for these countries. In particular, it shows that when traditional court procedures are hard to change, an alternative is to legally empower another entity to handle the entire process. The author explains how it was done in Colombia.

Regulation and Macroeconomic Performance

Loayza, Norman V.; Oviedo, Ana Maria; Servén, Luis
Fonte: World Bank, Washington, DC Publicador: World Bank, Washington, DC
Tipo: Publications & Research :: Policy Research Working Paper; Publications & Research
ENGLISH; EN_US
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.17%
Regulation is purportedly enacted to serve specific social purposes. In reality, however, it follows a more complex political economy process, where legitimate social goals are mixed with the objectives of particular interest groups. Whatever its justification and objectives, regulation can have potentially significant macroeconomic consequences, by helping or hampering the dynamics of economic restructuring and resource reallocation that underlie the growth process. This paper provides an empirical analysis of the macroeconomic impact of regulation. It first characterizes the stylized facts on regulation across the world, using a set of newly constructed, comprehensive indicators of regulation in a large number of countries in the 1990s. Using these indicators, the paper studies the effects of regulation on economic growth and macroeconomic volatility employing cross-country regression analysis. In particular, the paper considers whether the effects of regulation are affected by the country's level of institutional development. Finally, the analysis controls for the likely endogeneity of regulation with respect to macroeconomic performance. The paper concludes that a heavier regulatory burden reduces growth and increases volatility...

Essays in Corporate and Consumer Finance

Iverson, Benjamin Charles
Fonte: Harvard University Publicador: Harvard University
Tipo: Thesis or Dissertation
EN_US
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.43%
The first essay tests whether Chapter 11 restructuring outcomes are affected by time constraints in busy bankruptcy courts. Using the passage of the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act in 2005 as an exogenous shock to court caseloads, I estimate the impact of bankruptcy caseload changes on the outcomes of firms in Chapter 11. I find that as bankruptcy judges become busier they tend to allow more firms to reorganize. Firms that reorganize in busy courts spend longer in bankruptcy, while firms that are dismissed from busy courts are more likely to re-file for bankruptcy within three years of their original filing. In addition, busy courts impose costs on local banks, which report higher charge-offs on business lending when caseload increases. Using novel data that has complete coverage of claims for 136 Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection filings and that includes detailed information on claims transfers, in the second essay we provide the first empirical insight on how a firm's ownership changes during the bankruptcy process and how these changes impact bankruptcy outcomes. Pre-bankruptcy ownership concentration is important for the coordination of a prearranged bankruptcy filing and is associated with a faster bankruptcy resolution and a higher likelihood of a successful reorganization. However...

Bankruptcy risk model and empirical tests

Podobnik, Boris; Horvatic, Davor; Petersen, Alexander M.; Urošević, Branko; Stanley, H. Eugene
Fonte: Universidade Cornell Publicador: Universidade Cornell
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 11/11/2010
Relevância na Pesquisa
36.31%
We analyze the size dependence and temporal stability of firm bankruptcy risk in the US economy by applying Zipf scaling techniques. We focus on a single risk factor-the debt-to-asset ratio R-in order to study the stability of the Zipf distribution of R over time. We find that the Zipf exponent increases during market crashes, implying that firms go bankrupt with larger values of R. Based on the Zipf analysis, we employ Bayes's theorem and relate the conditional probability that a bankrupt firm has a ratio R with the conditional probability of bankruptcy for a firm with a given R value. For 2,737 bankrupt firms, we demonstrate size dependence in assets change during the bankruptcy proceedings. Prepetition firm assets and petition firm assets follow Zipf distributions but with different exponents, meaning that firms with smaller assets adjust their assets more than firms with larger assets during the bankruptcy process. We compare bankrupt firms with nonbankrupt firms by analyzing the assets and liabilities of two large subsets of the US economy: 2,545 Nasdaq members and 1,680 New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) members. We find that both assets and liabilities follow a Pareto distribution. The finding is not a trivial consequence of the Zipf scaling relationship of firm size quantified by employees-although the market capitalization of Nasdaq stocks follows a Pareto distribution...