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Epidemiology and microbiology of diarrhoea in young Aboriginal children in the Kimberley region of Western Australia.

Gunzburg, S.; Gracey, M.; Burke, V.; Chang, B.
Fonte: Cambridge University Press Publicador: Cambridge University Press
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /02/1992 EN
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46.36%
Infectious diarrhoea is common in young Australian Aborigines and is one of the main causes for their unsatisfactory health standards with consequent widespread failure to thrive and undernutrition. Most published reports relate to patients in hospital or to hospital admission statistics and give little indication of the extent or severity of diarrhoeal disease in children in Aboriginal communities. The present investigation involved more than 100 Aboriginal children up to 5 years of age living in remote communities in the tropical north of Western Australia who were studied prospectively over a 12-month period.

Social determinants of health and the future well-being of Aboriginal children in Canada

Greenwood, Margo Lianne; de Leeuw, Sarah Naomi
Fonte: Pulsus Group Inc Publicador: Pulsus Group Inc
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2012 EN
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Aboriginal children’s well-being is vital to the health and success of our future nations. Addressing persistent and current Aboriginal health inequities requires considering both the contexts in which disparities exist and innovative and culturally appropriate means of rectifying those inequities. The present article contextualizes Aboriginal children’s health disparities, considers ‘determinants’ of health as opposed to biomedical explanations of ill health and concludes with ways to intervene in health inequities. Aboriginal children experience a greater burden of ill health compared with other children in Canada, and these health inequities have persisted for too long. A change that will impact individuals, communities and nations, a change that will last beyond seven generations, is required. Applying a social determinants of health framework to health inequities experienced by Aboriginal children can create that change.

Breastfeeding Duration and Residential Isolation amid Aboriginal Children in Western Australia

Cromie, Elizabeth A. S.; Shepherd, Carrington C. J.; Zubrick, Stephen R.; Oddy, Wendy H.
Fonte: MDPI Publicador: MDPI
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 13/12/2012 EN
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Objectives: To examine factors that impact on breastfeeding duration among Western Australian Aboriginal children. We hypothesised that Aboriginal children living in remote locations in Western Australia were breastfed for longer than those living in metropolitan locations. Methods: A population-based cross-sectional survey was conducted from 2000 to 2002 in urban, rural and remote settings across Western Australia. Cross-tabulations and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed, using survey weights to produce unbiased estimates for the population of Aboriginal children. Data on demographic, maternal and infant characteristics were collected from 3932 Aboriginal birth mothers about their children aged 0–17 years (representing 22,100 Aboriginal children in Western Australia). Results: 71% of Aboriginal children were breastfed for three months or more. Accounting for other factors, there was a strong gradient for breastfeeding duration by remoteness, with Aboriginal children living in areas of moderate isolation being 3.2 times more likely to be breastfed for three months or more (p < 0.001) compared to children in metropolitan Perth. Those in areas of extreme isolation were 8.6 times more likely to be breastfed for three months or longer (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Greater residential isolation a protective factor linked to longer breastfeeding duration for Aboriginal children in our West Australian cohort.

Prevalence of and risk factors for asthma in off-reserve Aboriginal children and adults in Canada

Chang, Hsiu-Ju; Beach, Jeremy; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan
Fonte: Pulsus Group Inc Publicador: Pulsus Group Inc
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2012 EN
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Only a few studies have investigated asthma morbidity in Canadian Aboriginal children. In the present study, data from the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey were used to determine the prevalence and risk factors for asthma in Canadian Aboriginal children six to 14 years of age and adults 15 to 64 years of age living off reserve. The prevalence of asthma was 14.3% in children and 14.0% in adults. Children and adults with Inuit ancestry had a significantly lower prevalence of asthma than those with North American Indian and Métis ancestries. Factors significantly associated with ever asthma in children included male sex, allergy, low birth weight, obesity, poor dwelling conditions and urban residence. In adults, factors associated with ever asthma varied among Aboriginal groups; however, age group, sex and urban residence were associated with ever asthma in all four Aboriginal groups. The prevalence of asthma was lower in Aboriginal children and higher in Aboriginal adults compared with that reported for the Canadian population. Variation in the prevalence of and risk factors for asthma among Aboriginal ancestry groups may be related to genetic and environmental factors that require further investigation.

Diversity of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Strains Colonizing Australian Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Children

Pickering, J.; Smith-Vaughan, H.; Beissbarth, J.; Bowman, J. M.; Wiertsema, S.; Riley, T. V.; Leach, A. J.; Richmond, P.; Lehmann, D.; Kirkham, L.-A.
Fonte: American Society for Microbiology Publicador: American Society for Microbiology
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /05/2014 EN
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Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) strains are responsible for respiratory-related infections which cause a significant burden of disease in Australian children. We previously identified a disparity in NTHI culture-defined carriage rates between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children (42% versus 11%). The aim of this study was to use molecular techniques to accurately determine the true NTHI carriage rates (excluding other culture-identical Haemophilus spp.) and assess whether the NTHI strain diversity correlates with the disparity in NTHI carriage rates. NTHI isolates were cultured from 595 nasopharyngeal aspirates collected longitudinally from asymptomatic Aboriginal (n = 81) and non-Aboriginal (n = 76) children aged 0 to 2 years living in the Kalgoorlie-Boulder region, Western Australia. NTHI-specific 16S rRNA gene PCR and PCR ribotyping were conducted on these isolates. Confirmation of NTHI by 16S rRNA gene PCR corrected the NTHI carriage rates from 42% to 36% in Aboriginal children and from 11% to 9% in non-Aboriginal children. A total of 75 different NTHI ribotypes were identified, with 51% unique to Aboriginal children and 13% unique to non-Aboriginal children (P < 0.0001). The strain richness (proportion of different NTHI ribotypes) was similar for Aboriginal (19%...

Les enfants autochtones en protection de la jeunesse au Québec : leur réalité comparée à celle des autres enfants

Breton, Alexandra
Fonte: Université de Montréal Publicador: Université de Montréal
Tipo: Thèse ou Mémoire numérique / Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
FR
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Les populations autochtones canadiennes ont un passé difficile qui influence leur vécu actuel. Les recherches canadiennes et ailleurs dans le monde s’entendent sur la surreprésentation des enfants autochtones en protection de l’enfance. Au Canada, la surreprésentation s’explique présentement par la présence de conditions de vie dégradées plutôt qu’en raison d’un traitement différentiel des services de protection à l’égard des enfants autochtones. La présente étude ajoute aux connaissances sur les mauvais traitements et la réponse des services de protection de la jeunesse aux enfants autochtones québécois en s’intéressant à trois questions : leur surreprésentation, leurs différences par rapport aux autres enfants et les prédicteurs du placement. D’abord, à partir des données administratives de la protection de la jeunesse, la surreprésentation des enfants autochtones est évaluée à trois étapes des services : les signalements retenus, les situations fondées et les placements. Les enfants autochtones et les autres enfants sont comparés sur un ensemble de caractéristiques personnelles, familiales, parentales des signalements et des services rendus. Les prédicteurs du placement des enfants desservis par la protection de la jeunesse sont enfin vérifiés...

Aboriginal Parental Involvement/Engagement for Student Success

Moses, Mark
Fonte: Brock University Publicador: Brock University
Tipo: Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
ENG
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An increasing body of knowledge links parental involvement with student success but few studies address Aboriginal parental involvement in urban settings. While some critics argue traditional Aboriginal knowledge is best delivered at home, Aboriginal children who share parents’ stories in the classroom benefit other children who draw connections to these stories. Moreover, Aboriginal learners need to function in mainstream Western society and in public school settings in which educators often have a difficult time engaging Aboriginal parents. Consequently, this research sought to explore the perceptions and sense of engagement of parents/caregivers in the Aboriginal Student Program (ASP) in a publicly funded secondary school in Ontario. The study was an extension of the researcher’s existing work and focused specifically on a sample of parents/caregivers taking part in an Aboriginal feast at an Ontario secondary school. Nine individuals accepted an invitation to participate in a Talking Circle and shared perceptions of their children’s educational experiences. Data were collected and coded, and findings indicated that parental involvement in children’s educational journeys contributed significantly to a sense of parental engagement in the school and in Aboriginal programs. Results also suggest that Eurocentric pedagogy can be modified in mainstream secondary schools to directly involve Aboriginal parents/caregivers. Although many participants’ stories revealed they experienced racism during their own schooling...

Reshaping civilization: liberalism between assimilation and cultural genocide

van Krieken, Robert
Fonte: Universidade Nacional da Austrália Publicador: Universidade Nacional da Austrália
Tipo: Working/Technical Paper Formato: 212197 bytes; 353 bytes; application/pdf; application/octet-stream
EN_AU
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The 20th century has not been one for Occidentals to be proud of, when you think of the aspirations of Western liberals at its outset, the efforts directed at all manner of progress and improvement, and how much so many millions of people have ended up suffering, and continue to suffer, at each other=s hands. The management of violence in all its diverse forms is arguably a problem of similar significance in the year 2001 as it was in 1901 - or 1801, 1501. It could be said that it has simply become more complex and differentiated. In addition, since 10 November 1989, roughly, there has been a striking shift in the way Western nations, states and peoples reflect back on the normative dimensions of their past history. Concepts like >reparation=, >restitution= and >reconciliation= have taken on new resonances, and observers like Elazar Barkan (2000) remark on a new and growing collective desire, largely but not only among Occidentals, to rethink history in ways which redress a range of past injustices. The idea of >restorative justice= (Strang & Braithwaite 2001), then, is one which applies not only to contemporary problems such as the relationship between perpetrators and victims of crime, it also gets stretched across time to encompass historical injustices (Gordon 1996) which have come to be seen as such because their cognitive frames have shifted. This normative rethinking of the past is...

Lack of diagnostic accuracy of the monoclonal stool antigen test for detection of helicobacter pylori infection in young Australian aboriginal children

Ritchie, B.; Brewster, D.; Cuong, T.; McNeil, Y.; Zacharakis, B.; Davidson, G.; Butler, R.
Fonte: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Publicador: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2009 EN
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BACKGROUND: : The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection among Aboriginal Australians children is unclear. The aims of the present study are to determine the prevalence of H. pylori infection among young Aboriginal children recovering from acute diarrheal disease in hospital and to evaluate the H. pylori stool antigen test as a noninvasive diagnostic test in this setting. METHODS: : This was a prospective comparative study using the C-Urea Breath Test as reference standard. Fifty-two children between 4 months and 2 years of age were consecutively enrolled. These children comprised a representative sample of Australian Aboriginal children admitted to hospital with acute diarrheal disease from remote and rural communities across Northern Territory of Australia. RESULTS: : The overall prevalence of H. pylori was 44.2%. The stool antigen test had a sensitivity of 0.55 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.35-0.73) with a positive predictive value of 0.65 (95% CI: 0.42-0.82). The specificity was 0.68 (95% CI: 0.46-0.84) with a negative predictive value of 0.58 (95% CI: 0.39-0.75). Analysis of receiver operator characteristic curve yielded an overall accuracy of the stool antigen test of 61% (48%-75%). CONCLUSIONS: : The prevalence of H. pylori infection among very young Aboriginal children from remote and rural communities was high and consistent with early acquisition. The diagnostic accuracy of the stool antigen test to diagnose H. pylori in this setting was poor.; Ritchie...

Efficacy of lactobacillus GG in aboriginal children with acute diarrhoeal disease: A randomised clinical trial

Ritchie, B.; Brewster, D.; Tran, C.; Davidson, G.; McNeil, Y.; Butler, R.
Fonte: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Publicador: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2010 EN
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OBJECTIVE: The effectiveness of probiotic therapy for acute rotavirus infectious diarrhoea in an indigenous setting with bacterial/parasitic diarrhoea is unclear. In the present study, we assessed the efficacy of probiotics in Australian Aboriginal children in the Northern Territory admitted to hospital with diarrhoeal disease. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A randomised double-blind placebo-controlled study was conducted in Aboriginal children (ages 4 months-2 years), admitted to hospital with acute diarrhoeal disease (>3 loose stools per day). Children received either oral Lactobacillus GG (5 x 10(9) colony-forming units 3 times per day for 3 days; n = 33) or placebo (n = 31). Small intestinal functional capacity was assessed by the noninvasive 13C-sucrose breath test on days 1 and 4. RESULTS: Both groups showed mean improvement in the sucrose breath test after 4 days; however, there was no difference (mean, 95% confidence interval) between probiotic (2.9 [cumulative percentage of dose recovered at 90 minutes]; 1.7-4.2) and placebo (3.7; 2.3-5.2) groups. Probiotics did not change the duration of diarrhoea, total diarrhoea stools, or diarrhoea score compared with placebo. There was a significant (P < 0.05) difference in diarrhoea frequency on day 2 between probiotics (3.3 [loose stools]; 2.5-4.3) and placebo (4.7; 3.8-5.7) groups. CONCLUSIONS: Lactobacillus GG did not appear to enhance short-term recovery following acute diarrhoeal illness in this setting.; Brett K. Ritchie...

Ceduna Aboriginal Children and Family Centre: Indigenous Design Considerations. Report to Department of Transport, Energy and Infrastructure (South Australia). 106p.

Grant, E.
Fonte: Universidade de Adelaide Publicador: Universidade de Adelaide
Tipo: Relatório
Publicado em //2011 EN
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This report was commissioned by the Department of Transport, Energy and Infrastructure (DTEI) South Australia as part of the preliminary design process for the Ceduna Aboriginal Children and Family Centre. This report aims to provide deeper understandings of the Indigenous design issues for the design team including preliminary comments to inform the design process.; Elizabeth Grant

Christies Beach Aboriginal Children and Family Centre: Indigenous Design Considerations. Report to Department of Transport, Energy and Infrastructure (South Australia). 84p.

Grant, E.
Fonte: Universidade de Adelaide Publicador: Universidade de Adelaide
Tipo: Relatório
Publicado em //2011 EN
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56.31%
This report was commissioned by the Department of Transport, Energy and Infrastructure (DTEI) South Australia as part of the preliminary design process for the Christies Beach Aboriginal Children and Family Centre.; Elizabeth Grant

South Australian four-year-old Aboriginal children: residence and socioeconomic status influence weight

Spurrier, N.; Volkmer, R.; Abdallah, C.; Chong, A.
Fonte: Public Health Assoc Australia Inc Publicador: Public Health Assoc Australia Inc
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2012 EN
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OBJECTIVE: Obesity rates have increased in children in Australia in the past 15 years. However, there is little available population data describing rates of overweight and obesity in Aboriginal children. METHODS: Anthropometric data of four-year-old children (n=11,859) were collected by trained nurses at routine statewide preschool health checks during 2009. Weight status (underweight, healthy weight, overweight and obese) was determined using age and gender specific International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) cut-points. RESULTS: There were 337 Aboriginal children (3%) in the study population. Aboriginal children had significantly higher rates of overweight and obesity compared to non-Aboriginal children (28% compared to 18% respectively, χ2p=0.0001). A statistically significant association between BMIz score and identifying as Aboriginal remained after controlling for rural/urban residence and socioeconomic status using multiple regression analyses. CONCLUSIONS: Aboriginal children have higher rates of overweight and obesity compared to their non-Aboriginal peers by the time they are four years of age. Aboriginal children have higher BMIz scores compared to non-Aboriginal children after controlling for rural/urban residence and socioeconomic status. IMPLICATIONS: A significant investment is required to optimise the health of Aboriginal women before pregnancy and throughout pregnancy. A rethink may be necessary in the approach to dietary management and catch-up growth of Aboriginal children of low birth weight or having growth failure in early childhood.; Nicola J. Spurrier...

The emergence of obesity among Australian Aboriginal children

Natalie, P.; Henneberg, M.; Norgan, N.; Schmitt, L.; Potter, C.; Ulijaszek, S.
Fonte: De Gruyter Publicador: De Gruyter
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2013 EN
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Obesity is of significant and growing concern among Australian Aboriginal children, and is linked to patterns of child growth. The aim of this paper is to show diverse patterns of growth and obesity emergence among Australian Aboriginal children using historical anthropometric data. Child growth in height, weight and body mass index (BMI) is reanalysed for children aged 2 to 19 years in Australian Aboriginal communities spanning two distinct time periods (the 1950s and 1960s; and the 1990s and 2000s) and six different geographical locations: Yuendumu, Haast’s Bluff, Beswick, Kalumburu, Gerard, and Raukkan. Comparisons of stature and BMI between the earlier and later years of measurement were made, and the proportion of children classified as overweight or obese by the International Obesity Task Force criteria estimated, to allow international comparison. Aboriginal children in the 1990s and 2000s were heavier, with higher BMI than those in the 1950s and 1960s, differences in height being less marked. While no children were classified as overweight or obese in the earlier period, 15% of males and 3% of females were classified so in the later period. The data suggests that the period of onset of the epidemic of overweight and obesity among rural Australian Aboriginal children was likely to have been between the 1960s and 1980s.; Natalie Phillips...

Architecture for Aboriginal children and families: a post occupancy evaluation of the Taikurrendi, Gabmididi Manoo and Ngura Yadurirn Children and Family Centres

Grant, E.M.; Green, I.; Colbung, M.
Fonte: Adelaide, S.A. Publicador: Adelaide, S.A.
Tipo: Relatório
Publicado em //2015 EN
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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures are proud, living cultures. The survival and revival of cultures relies on cultural identity being an integral part of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children’s educational environment and providing environments that respect the ancestral ways, family, cultural and community traditions. Family is at the core of Aboriginal society and well-being. Complex kinship systems are central to how the culture is passed on and society is organised with families having the primary responsibility for the upbringing, protection and development of their children. Providing a safe communal setting of loving and caring with opportunities for a child’s growth, development and self-empowerment has dramatic impacts on the overall welfare of the child and is pivotal in addressing the disadvantages experienced by the Aboriginal children. This report reviews the development, outcomes and responses of users to three Children and Family Centres constructed in South Australia. The Gabmididi Manoo Children and Family Centre (Whyalla), Taikurrendi Children and Family Centre (Christies Beach) and the Ngura Yadurirn Children and Family Centre (Ceduna) were developed by the Department for Education and Child Development (South Australia) within the National Partnership Agreement on Indigenous Early Childhood Development framework. The projects are recognised as Australian exemplars in the design of facilities for Aboriginal children and families. The projects have been overwhelming received by the communities concerned and have resulted in growing numbers of Aboriginal children engaging in early learning in the areas where they are located. The Aboriginal communities concerned were keen to see the Aboriginal Children and Family Centres as places where Aboriginal people can be empowered. Critical to the success of the projects was the concept of placemaking and the creation of Aboriginal ‘places’...

Cancer in Australian Aboriginal children: room for improvement

Rotte, L.; Hansford, J.; Kirby, M.; Osborn, M.; Suppiah, R.; Ritchie, P.; Tapp, H.; Rice, M.; Revesz, T.
Fonte: Wiley Publicador: Wiley
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2013 EN
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AIM: The study aims to analyse clinical data and outcome in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children with cancer. METHODS: This is a retrospective case-note review of biological features, treatment outcome and survival in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children with a malignancy who were treated at the Women's and Children's Hospital, a tertiary referral hospital, from January 1997 through March 2011. Two separate analyses were performed: firstly, for each Aboriginal patient comparisons were made with two age, sex and diagnosis-matched control patients; then secondly, results for the Aboriginal group of patients were compared with the whole non-Aboriginal group of patients. RESULTS: In the first analysis, Aboriginal children had a significantly higher 'remoteness index' (6.14 vs. 0.95; P < 0.001) and were less likely to be enrolled on clinical trials. Survival analysis of the Aboriginal patients and their matched controls showed a trend towards inferior overall survival for the Indigenous children (P = 0.066). In the second analysis, Aboriginal children tended to have a higher proportion of leukaemias and lymphomas and had an overrepresentation of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) (P = 0.009). The mean age among Aboriginal children with AML and lymphoma was lower (AML: 3.5 vs. 8 years...

Case studies of inclusiveness: planning and design of Gabmididi Manoo, Taikurrendi and Ceduna Aboriginal children and family centres

Colbung, M.; Grant, E.M.; Green, I.
Fonte: Australian Institute of Family Studies Publicador: Australian Institute of Family Studies
Tipo: Conference item
Publicado em //2014 EN
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The Council of Australian Governments has committed $564.6m to improve Indigenous early childhood development across Australia. In partnership with the Commonwealth Government, the Department for Education and Children's Services (South Australia) took the role as the lead agency in establishing four Aboriginal Children and Family Centres in various locations in South Australia. The development of Aboriginal Children and Family Centres is intended to provide a "one stop shop" that delivers the programs and services to address the needs of the child from birth to 5 years and their family. Community leaders and the working groups for the Centres recognised a unique opportunity to engage the Aboriginal communities in the planning and design processes for three new centres at Whyalla, Christies Beach and Ceduna. It was identified that there was a capacity for the design of the Centres to meet the varying and diverse environmental, cultural and socio-spatial needs of the Aboriginal users to produce educational environments that could better meet the needs of groups and to minimise the adverse effects commonly caused by poorly designed educational and community environments. This paper describes the three Aboriginal Children and Family Centres. These are the first Aboriginal early childhood and family centres in Australia designed under a participatory planning process and this paper describes the benefits and constraints of the process and product...

Bringing the message home : enabling urban aboriginal families for wholistic health

McNeil, Karen Patricia
Fonte: Quens University Publicador: Quens University
Tipo: Tese de Doutorado Formato: 570351 bytes; application/pdf
EN; EN
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BACKGROUND: The health of Aboriginal children and families has been negatively influenced by existing social and economic disparities, dramatic lifestyle disruption, social marginalization, inactivity, dietary change, and lower rates of educational attainment (in comparison with non-Aboriginal populations). Interventions to reduce these risks should emphasize a wholistic approach, consistent with indigenous understandings of the interconnectedness of physical, spiritual, mental and emotional wellbeing. Some positive effects have been seen in family based interventions promoting health, however researchers do not yet know how best to leverage the influence of family through these interventions. This study takes a community-based participatory approach and ecological perspective to develop tailored strategies and resources to engage families in supporting wholistic health messages received through AKWE:GO (a community-based outreach program for at-risk urban Aboriginal youth). PURPOSE: To discover what activities families (i.e., parents and children) associate with wholistic health, as well as any barriers, facilitators, and competition faced when attempting to engage in health behaviours. Findings will be used to inform the development of take-home packages for AKWE:GO families promoting wholistic health. METHODS: Fifteen women and 4 men (most are parents of AKWE:GO participants)...

Development of the Physical Activity Interactive Recall (PAIR) for Aboriginal children

Lévesque, Lucie; Cargo, Margaret; Salsberg, Jon
Fonte: Université de Montréal Publicador: Université de Montréal
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: 935535 bytes; application/pdf
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BACKGROUND:Aboriginal children in Canada are at increased risk for type 2 diabetes. Given that physical inactivity is an important modifiable risk factor for type 2 diabetes, prevention efforts targeting Aboriginal children include interventions to enhance physical activity involvement. These types of interventions require adequate assessment of physical activity patterns to identify determinants, detect trends, and evaluate progress towards intervention goals. The purpose of this study was to develop a culturally appropriate interactive computer program to self-report physical activity for Kanien'kehá:ka (Mohawk) children that could be administered in a group setting. This was an ancillary study of the ongoing Kahnawake Schools Diabetes Prevention Project (KSDPP).METHODS:During Phase I, focus groups were conducted to understand how children describe and graphically depict type, intensity and duration of physical activity. Sixty-six students (40 girls, 26 boys, mean age = 8.8 years, SD = 1.8) from four elementary schools in three eastern Canadian Kanien'kehá:ka communities participated in 15 focus groups. Children were asked to discuss and draw about physical activity. Content analysis of focus groups informed the development of a school-day and non-school-day version of the physical activity interactive recall (PAIR). In Phase II...

Disease patterns among Canadian aboriginal children. Study in a remote rural setting.

Harris, S. B.; Glazier, R.; Eng, K.; McMurray, L.
Fonte: College of Family Physicians of Canada Publicador: College of Family Physicians of Canada
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /09/1998 EN
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OBJECTIVE: To describe disease patterns among children in an isolated aboriginal community, and to compare them with patterns found among other aboriginal and non-aboriginal Canadian children. DESIGN: Retrospective review of logbooks and patient charts extracted from nursing station records for all visits to the community's nursing station between April 1, 1990, and March 31, 1991. SETTING: An isolated aboriginal community located in northwestern Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: All aboriginal children younger than 5 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Disease-specific incidence per 100 person-years by age, sex, and season. RESULTS: Upper and lower respiratory tract infections, skin conditions, otitis media, and chickenpox were the leading causes of illness. Except for chickenpox, these illnesses occurred at a significantly higher rate among infants than among children 1 to 4 years old. No important differences were found by sex for any condition, except asthma where boys predominated. Autumn and winter seasonal patterns were most evident for respiratory tract infections. The rate of illness for most conditions was higher than that reported among other aboriginal and non-aboriginal Canadian children. CONCLUSIONS: The illnesses most frequently seen in these children are respiratory tract infections and skin conditions. Etiologic factors are likely to be related to multiple interacting forces (both environmental and genetic) and require further investigation.