Página 7 dos resultados de 173 itens digitais encontrados em 0.002 segundos

Inversion of cane sugar in the honey stomach of the bee; Inversion du sucre de canne dans le jabot de l'abeille

Oertel, E.; Fieger, E.A.; Williams, V.R.; Andrews, E.A.
Fonte: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França Publicador: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França
Tipo: Journal Article-postprint
EN
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Nerve tracts in bee (Apis mellifica) running from the sight and antennal organs to the brain; Les circuits nerveux chez l'abeille (Apis mellifica) depuis l'organe de la vue et les antennes jusqu'au cerveau

Jawlowski, Hieronim
Fonte: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França Publicador: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França
Tipo: Journal Article-postprint
EN
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The source of the queen substance of the honey-bee (Apis mellifica L.); Source de la sécrétion de la reine d'abeille (Apis mellifica L.)

Butler, C.G.; Simpson, J.
Fonte: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França Publicador: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França
Tipo: Journal Article-postprint
EN
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The behaviour of bees when foraging; Le comportement de butinage de l'abeille

Butler, C.G.
Fonte: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França Publicador: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França
Tipo: Journal Article-postprint
EN
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The importance of perfume in the discovery of food by the worker honeybee (Apis mellifera L.); Importance du parfum dans la découverte de la nourriture chez l'ouvrière d'abeille (Apis mellifera L.)

Butler, C.G.
Fonte: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França Publicador: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França
Tipo: Journal Article-postprint
EN; ENGLISH
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There is a natural tendency for untrained scouting bees to associate certain perfumes with food (e.g. those of the flowers of Crataegus oxyacantha and Trifolium repens) whereas the perfume of some other flowers (e.g. Spirea arguta) are unattractive to the honeybee. If the perfume of a new crop of flowers is sufficiently strong it will sometimes attract scouting bees when they are still unable to see the flowers. It is often necessary for a bee to approach within an inch or so of a flower before she can discern any perfume it may possess. When a bee approaches an object closely enough any attractive perfume it may possess tends to act as a stimulus to further exploration which involves settling upon the object and possibly seeking food in any small crevice in or around it. Thus the perfume of the individual flower plays an important part in stimulating a nectar-seeking bee to enter it, whether she has learned to associate its perfume with food or not. Normal visitation of a flower which has previously been worked is suspended when the bee's olfactory sense is disturbed. This can be caused either by mutilation or by the presence of a strong foreign perfume. In general the results obtained from experiments with untrained bees support the conclusions reached by von Frisch (1919) in his work with trained bees...

Experiments on the poisoning of honeybees by insecticidal and fungicidal sprays used in orchards; Expérimentations sur l'intoxication des abeilles domestiques par les pulvérisations d'insecticides et de fongicides en vergers

Butler, C.G.; Finney, D.J.; Schiele, P.
Fonte: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França Publicador: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França
Tipo: Journal Article-postprint
EN; ENGLISH
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Losses of bees by poisoning have been greatly increased in recent years by the growing practice of applying insecticidal and fungicidal sprays to fruit trees. Preliminary laboratory tests showed that, of the common constituents of spray mixtures, only lead arsenate and flowers of sulphur were likely to cause serious honeybee poisoning, though Derris emulsion may cause slight poisoning. Syrup containing lime sulphur, nicotine sulphate, or copper sulphate was strongly repellent to the bees. It seemed possible that spray mixtures might be made repellent to the honeybee by the addition of suitable substances. Further trials showed that lead arsenate solution, at least in the concentrations normally used, was no more attractive to the bee than distilled water. Concentrations of 1/500 lime sulphur or 1/2000 nicotine sulphate were sufficient to reduce the uptake of M/1 sucrose to less than 10% of that of unadulterated sucrose solution, and very much lower concentrations appreciably affected the uptake. The presence of lead arsenate in these solutions seemed to make them even more repellent. The repellent effect was reduced, though not entirely destroyed, when the solutions were evaporated to dryness and taken up in distilled water again. Creosote (0.13%)...

Experiments on the poisoning of honeybees by insecticidal and fungicidal sprays used in orchards; Expérimentations sur l'intoxication des abeilles domestiques par les pulvérisations d'insecticides et de fongicides en vergers

Butler, C.G.; Finney, D.J.; Schiele, P.
Fonte: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França Publicador: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França
Tipo: Journal Article-postprint
EN; ENGLISH
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Losses of bees by poisoning have been greatly increased in recent years by the growing practice of applying insecticidal and fungicidal sprays to fruit trees. Preliminary laboratory tests showed that, of the common constituents of spray mixtures, only lead arsenate and flowers of sulphur were likely to cause serious honeybee poisoning, though Derris emulsion may cause slight poisoning. Syrup containing lime sulphur, nicotine sulphate, or copper sulphate was strongly repellent to the bees. It seemed possible that spray mixtures might be made repellent to the honeybee by the addition of suitable substances. Further trials showed that lead arsenate solution, at least in the concentrations normally used, was no more attractive to the bee than distilled water. Concentrations of 1/500 lime sulphur or 1/2000 nicotine sulphate were sufficient to reduce the uptake of M/1 sucrose to less than 10% of that of unadulterated sucrose solution, and very much lower concentrations appreciably affected the uptake. The presence of lead arsenate in these solutions seemed to make them even more repellent. The repellent effect was reduced, though not entirely destroyed, when the solutions were evaporated to dryness and taken up in distilled water again. Creosote (0.13%)...

The behaviour of worker honeybees at the hive entrance; Comportement des ouvrières d'abeilles domestiques à l'entrée de la ruche

Butler, C.G.; Free, J.B.
Fonte: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França Publicador: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França
Tipo: Journal Article-postprint
EN; ENGLISH
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1. Observations at hive entrances have been made to ascertain the relative importance of scent and behaviour in enabling a guard bee to recognise members of her own colony and to distinguish them from intruders from other colonies. 2. Guard bees are not present at the hive entrance unless the colony has been alerted. 3. Alerting of colonies is brought about by the presence of robber bees or by numbers of bees that have strayed from other colonies. 4. Guard bees attempt to intercept and inspect other bees on the alighting-board of the hive. Bees of various ages undertake guard duties. 5. Guard bees recognise members of their own colony by scent. 6. Robber bees are recognised by behaviour when attempting to enter the hive, but all other intruders are recognised by scent. 7. After recognition intruders, other than robbers, assume either a dominant or a submissive attitude. 8. A dominant intruder, usually a laden forager, enters the hive without hesitation or difficulty. 9. On interception a submissive intruder stops moving towards the hive entrance and allows herself to be subjected to extensive examination or mauling. 10. Whilst being extensively examined or mauled the submissive intruder offers food to the guards and on their refusal of it 'strops' her tongue. It is suggested that this is a displacement activity. 11. A submissive bee that is being mauled sometimes passes into a state of thanatosis. 12. Very young bees are recognised as intruders and mauled just as readily as older bees. 13. As long as an intruder remains submissive she is not stung by the guards. Intruders...

The transmission of food between worker honeybees; La transmission de nourriture chez les ouvrières de l'abeille domestique

Free, J. B.
Fonte: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França Publicador: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França
Tipo: Journal Article-postprint
EN; ENGLISH
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1. A study has been made of the behaviour patterns associated with food transmission between worker honeybees. 2. There is a general tendency for food to pass from the older to the younger workers of a colony, although there is a considerable passage of food in the opposite direction. Younger bees generally receive food more frequently than they give it. 3. As worker bees grow older, the mean ages of the bees that feed them and to whom they give food also increase. 4. Although bees about to give food generally have more in their honeystomachs than those about to receive it the quantities of food contained in the honeystomachs of bees in these two groups overlap considerably. The transmission of ‘queen substance’, the occupation on which a bee is engaged within the hive, and her environment, all influence the result. 5. The correlation between a bee's behaviour in connection with food transmission and the amount of food in her honeystomach is more marked in the case of recently emerged, unconditioned bees, than in the case of bees taken at random from their colonies. 6. The amount of food that individual bees retain in their honeystomachs is influenced by their past experience.

Torulopsis apicola nov. spec., new isolates from bees; Torulopsis apicola n. sp., nouveaux isolats chez l'abeille

Hajsig, M.
Fonte: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França Publicador: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França
Tipo: Journal Article-postprint
EN; ENGLISH
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When examining the normal fungal flora in the intestinal tract of bees, we isolated 7 strains of one yeast species from 6 out of 8 beehives. From each hive 10 bees were examined. These strains belonged to the genus Torulopsis, as given by Lodder and Kreger-van Rij (1952), but not to any known species. We are therefore describing a new species, for which we propose the name Torulopsis apicola. The description of this new budding yeast is based on the standard methods used by Lodder and Kreger-Van Rij (1952) and by Wickerham (1951) for the identification of yeasts.

The Composition of Beeswax and Other Waxes Secreted by Insects; Composition de la cire d'abeille et autres cires secrétées par les insectes

Tulloch, A.P.
Fonte: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França Publicador: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França
Tipo: Journal Article-postprint
EN; ENGLISH
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This review deals with waxes of members of two quite different groups of insects the bees and the scale insects,which secrete large amounts of wax. The former use wax as a structural material and the latter as a protective material. The compositions of waxes from some of these insects are described and particular attention is paid to the compositions of the unhydrolyzed waxes and to the presence of hydroxy acids. New analyses of beeswax and of wax of a species of bumble bee are reported. The structures of the diesters, hydroxyesters and diols of beeswax are elucidated. The bumble bee wax contains major proportions of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons, and of long chain saturated, mono- and diunsaturated esters. The relationship between structure and function of the waxes is discussed.

Poisoning of honey bees nectar from the Karaka tree (Corynocarpus laevigata J. R. et G. Forst.); Empoisonnement des abeilles domestiques par le nectar de l'arbre Karaka (Corynocarpus laevigata J. R. et G. Forst.)

Palmer-Jones, T.; Line, L. J. S.
Fonte: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França Publicador: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França
Tipo: Journal Article-postprint
EN; ENGLISH
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Nectar from the karaka tree (Corynocarpus laeuigata ].R. et G. Forst.), which flowers in the spring and is very attractive to honey bees, is highly toxic to adult bees. The problem can be dealt with by re-siting apiaries or moving them out of range of karakas during the flowering period.

Mortality of the honey bee, Apis mellifera, in colonies treated with certain biological insecticides; Mortalité de l'abeille, Apis mellifera, dans les colonies traitées avec certains insecticides biologiques

Cantwell, George E.; Knox, David A.; Lehnert, Thor; Michael, A.S.
Fonte: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França Publicador: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França
Tipo: Journal Article-postprint
EN; ENGLISH
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Candidate insect pathogens were fed at various levels to honey bees (Apis mellifera) either in small cages or in observation hives. The pathogens tested included two polyhedrosis viruses, a granulosis virus, a commercial preparation of Bacillus thuringiensis var. thuringiensis, spores, crystals, and the exotoxin of this variety, plus the crystals of varieties alesti and sotto. No mortality was recorded as a result of treatment with any of these pathogens except with the highest level of the exotoxin of B. thuringiensis.

The "Isle of Wight disease" : the origin and signifiance of the myth; La maladie de l'île de Wight : origine et sens du mythe

Bailey, L.
Fonte: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França Publicador: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França
Tipo: Journal Article-postprint
EN
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16.53%

The gross and histological pathology of a hairless-black syndrome in the adult honey bee, Apis mellifera; Pathologie de la paralysie chronique chez l'abeille domestique adulte, Apis mellifera : examen clinique et histologique

Horvath, Roberta J.; Rothenbuhler, Walter C.
Fonte: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França Publicador: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França
Tipo: Journal Article-postprint
EN; ENGLISH
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Twenty diseased and 17 control bees were studied grossly and histologically with respect to pathological manifestations of an adult bee disease (tentatively called hairless-black syndrome), which has not been clearly distinguished in the literature from several other diseases of adult bees. In a diseased bee as compared with a control, the abdomen was abnormally distended by an accumulation of unusually aqueous feces; the midgut was often white and translucent instead of brown; the lumen of the small intestinal portion of the hindgut contained an increased amount of basophilic material, probably intestinal flora; the wall of the small intestine had large lesions and necrotic appearing areas in about half of the cases; the cytoplasm of the small intestinal epithelial cells consistently contained small, spherical, basophilic granules; and finally the neuropile of most thoracic and abdominal ganglia were surrounded by extremely small basophilic granules. It is concluded that hairless-black syndrome is different from both chronic and acute bee paralysis, but may be the same as “Mal Nero” in Italy and is probably the same disease as that described from Great Britain by Morison under the name “bee paralysis”. ☆This paper is a portion of a thesis submitted by the senior author and accepted by The Ohio State University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree Master of Science.

The gross and histological pathology of a hairless-black syndrome in the adult honey bee, Apis mellifera; Pathologie de la paralysie chronique chez l'abeille domestique adulte, Apis mellifera : examen clinique et histologique

Horvath, Roberta J.; Rothenbuhler, Walter C.
Fonte: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França Publicador: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França
Tipo: Journal Article-postprint
EN; ENGLISH
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16.53%
Twenty diseased and 17 control bees were studied grossly and histologically with respect to pathological manifestations of an adult bee disease (tentatively called hairless-black syndrome), which has not been clearly distinguished in the literature from several other diseases of adult bees. In a diseased bee as compared with a control, the abdomen was abnormally distended by an accumulation of unusually aqueous feces; the midgut was often white and translucent instead of brown; the lumen of the small intestinal portion of the hindgut contained an increased amount of basophilic material, probably intestinal flora; the wall of the small intestine had large lesions and necrotic appearing areas in about half of the cases; the cytoplasm of the small intestinal epithelial cells consistently contained small, spherical, basophilic granules; and finally the neuropile of most thoracic and abdominal ganglia were surrounded by extremely small basophilic granules. It is concluded that hairless-black syndrome is different from both chronic and acute bee paralysis, but may be the same as “Mal Nero” in Italy and is probably the same disease as that described from Great Britain by Morison under the name “bee paralysis”. ☆This paper is a portion of a thesis submitted by the senior author and accepted by The Ohio State University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree Master of Science.

The intracellular canaliculi of the pharyngeal glands of the honeybee; Les canaliculi intracellulaires des glandes pharyngiennes chez l'abeille

Beams, H. W.; King, R. L.
Fonte: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França Publicador: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França
Tipo: Journal Article-postprint
EN
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The effect of the size of a honeybee colony on its foraging activity; Effet de la taille d'une colonie d'abeilles sur son activité de butinage

Free, J. B.; Preece, D. A.
Fonte: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França Publicador: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França
Tipo: Journal Article-postprint
EN; ENGLISH - FRANçAIS
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Deterioration in foraging conditions discourages foraging relatively more from large than from small colonies. Une détérioration des conditions de butinage décourage relativement plus le butinage chez les fortes colonies que chez les petites.

Paralysis of the Honey Bee, Apis mellifera Linnaeus; La paralysie de l'abeille domestique, Apis mellifera Linnaeus

Bailey, L.
Fonte: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França Publicador: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França
Tipo: Journal Article-postprint
EN; ENGLISH
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Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) was differentiated from acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV) by the symptoms it caused when injected into normal bees and by histological and serological means. It was isolated from naturally paralyzed bees from various parts of Britain and from Hong Kong, and, in one instance, from normal bees. Overt disease disappeared when the queens of naturally diseased colonies were replaced with others from normal colonies. Normal bees in colonies or cages were resistant to chronic paralysis when sprayed or fed with CBPV. Bees injected with CBPV transmitted it in the food they passed to normal bees.

The signs of adult bee diseases; Les signes de maladie chez l'abeille adulte

Bailey, L.
Fonte: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França Publicador: INRA - Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agronômica da França
Tipo: Journal Article-postprint
EN
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16.53%