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Recent incarceration independently associated with syringe sharing by injection drug users.

Wood, Evan; Li, Kathy; Small, Will; Montaner, Julio S.; Schechter, Martin T.; Kerr, Thomas
Fonte: Association of Schools of Public Health Publicador: Association of Schools of Public Health
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2005 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.41%
OBJECTIVES: Few prospective studies are available on the relationship between incarceration and HIV risk among injection drug users (IDUs). The authors evaluated self-reported rates of syringe sharing and incarceration among a cohort of IDUs. METHODS: This study analyzed syringe lending by HIV-infected IDUs and syringe borrowing by HIV-negative IDUs among participants enrolled in the Vancouver Injection Drug Users Study (VIDUS). Since serial measures for each individual were available, variables potentially associated with each outcome (syringe lending and borrowing) were evaluated using generalized estimating equations for binary outcomes. RESULTS: The study sample consisted of 1,475 IDUs who were enrolled into the VIDUS cohort from May 1996 through May 2002. At baseline, 1,123 (76%) reported a history of incarceration since they first began injecting drugs. Of these individuals, 351 (31%) reported at baseline that they had injected drugs while incarcerated. Among 318 baseline HIV-infected IDUs, having been incarcerated in the six months prior to each interview remained independently associated with syringe lending during the same period (adjusted odds ratio [OR]=1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.06, 1.69; p=0.015). Similarly, among the 1...

Incarceration and Sexually Transmitted Infections: A Neighborhood Perspective

Thomas, James C.; Levandowski, Brooke A.; Isler, Malika Roman; Torrone, Elizabeth; Wilson, George
Fonte: Springer US Publicador: Springer US
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.47%
The social dynamics of some communities are affected by the loss of significant numbers of people to prison and by the release of others who encounter the challenge of coping with the negative effects of the incarceration experience. The effects on communities are evident, in part, in the high rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in North Carolina (NC) counties that have a high rate of incarceration. In the present study, we examined whether the same associations can be observed at the census tract level in one urban city of NC. To identify the mechanisms by which incarceration can affect the transmission of STIs, we conducted ethnographic interviews with ex-offenders and people who lost a sexual partner to prison. We found that census tract rates of incarceration were consistently associated with gonorrhea rates in the subsequent year. An increase of the percentage of census tract person-time spent in prison from 2.0% to 2.5% corresponded to a gonorrhea rate increase of 7.1 cases per 100,000 person-years. The people interviewed spoke of sexual partnership changes including those left behind finding new partners, in part for help in making financial ends meet; men having sex with men for the first time in prison; and having multiple new partners upon reentry to the community. The statistical associations and stories of the effects of incarceration on sexual relationships provide additional evidence of unintended community health consequences of high rates of incarceration.

Mass incarceration can explain population increases in TB and multidrug-resistant TB in European and central Asian countries

Stuckler, David; Basu, Sanjay; McKee, Martin; King, Lawrence
Fonte: National Academy of Sciences Publicador: National Academy of Sciences
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.47%
Several microlevel studies have pinpointed prisons as an important site for tuberculosis (TB) and multidrug-resistant TB in European and central Asian countries. To date, no comparative analyses have examined whether rises in incarceration rates can account for puzzling differences in TB trends among overall populations. Using longitudinal TB and cross-sectional multidrug-resistant TB data for 26 eastern European and central Asian countries, we examined whether and to what degree increases in incarceration account for differences in population TB and multidrug-resistant TB burdens. We find that each percentage point increase in incarceration rates relates to an increased TB incidence of 0.34% (population attributable risk, 95% C.I.: 0.10–0.58%, P < 0.01), after controlling for TB infrastructure; HIV prevalence; and several surveillance, economic, demographic, and political indicators. Net increases in incarceration account for a 20.5% increase in TB incidence or nearly three-fifths of the average total increase in TB incidence in the countries studied from 1991 to 2002. Although the number of prisoners is a significant determinant of differences in TB incidence and multidrug-resistant TB prevalence among countries, the rate of prison growth is a larger determinant of these outcomes...

The Harm Inside: Injection during incarceration among male injection drug users in Tijuana, Mexico

Pollini, Robin A.; Alvelais, Jorge; Gallardo, Manuel; Vera, Alicia; Lozada, Remedios; Magis-Rodriquez, Carlos; Strathdee, Steffanie A.
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.41%
Limited access to sterile syringes and condoms in correctional facilities make these settings high risk environments for HIV transmission. Although incarceration among injection drug users (IDUs) is common, there is limited information regarding specific IDU risk behaviors inside. We examined correlates of incarceration, injection inside and syringe sharing inside among male IDUs recruited in Tijuana, Mexico, using respondent driven sampling (RDS) (n=898). An interviewer administered survey collected data on sociodemographic, behavioral and contextual characteristics. Associations with a) history of incarceration, b) injection inside, and c) syringe sharing inside were identified using univariate and multiple logistic regression models with RDS adjustment. Seventy-six percent of IDUs had been incarcerated, of whom 61% injected inside. Three quarters (75%) of those who injected shared syringes. U.S. deportation [adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=1.61; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07, 2.43] and migration (AOR=1.81; 95% CI: 1.12, 2.95) were independently associated with incarceration. Injection inside was independently associated with recent receptive syringe sharing (AOR=2.46; 95% CI: 1.75, 3.45) and having sex with a man while incarcerated (AOR=43.59; 95% CI: 1.65...

A Longitudinal Study of Incarceration and HIV Risk Among Methadone Maintained Men and Their Primary Female Partners

Epperson, Matthew W.; Khan, Maria R.; El-Bassel, Nabila; Wu, Elwin; Gilbert, Louisa
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /02/2011 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.41%
This study examines the longitudinal relationship between personal and sexual partner incarceration and subsequent HIV risk behaviors among drug-involved men and their primary female sexual partners. A random sample of 356 men in methadone treatment in New York City were interviewed at baseline, 6 and 12 months; these men also reported information on their primary female sexual partners. Female partner recent incarceration was associated with subsequent increase in multiple partnerships for the male participants (AOR: 3.31; 95% C.I.: 1.26–8.72, P < .05). Female partner incarceration was also associated with reduced likelihood of subsequent unprotected sex between primary partners (AOR: .13; 95% C.I.: .05–.40, P < .01); this finding is somewhat unique and warrants further investigation. Findings support the notion of mutual influence in the case of female partner incarceration, which is associated with both female partner and male partner risk behaviors. HIV prevention implications are discussed, including the need for couple-based HIV prevention interventions targeting couples affected by incarceration.

Incarceration, African Americans, and HIV: Advancing a Research Agenda

Harawa, Nina; Adimora, Adaora
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /01/2008 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.41%
Incarceration is a crisis among African-Americans, and the prevalence of HIV/AIDS in incarcerated men and women is three to five times that of the general population. We explore the potential implications of the widespread incarceration of African Americans on HIV risk and HIV outcomes in 1) the current and formerly incarcerated, 2) their sexual partners, and 3) the communities impacted by incarceration. We set forth a research agenda for understanding and ameliorating the negative impacts incarceration and conclude that African-American populations’ ability to successfully address the HIV/AIDS epidemic requires a coordinated and evidence-based response to the challenge of effectively preventing, managing, and treating HIV in populations affected by incarceration.

Paternal Incarceration and Support for Children in Fragile Families

Geller, Amanda; Garfinkel, Irwin; Western, Bruce
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /02/2011 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.41%
High U.S. incarceration rates have motivated recent research on the negative effects of imprisonment on later employment, earnings, and family relationships. Because most men in jail and prison are fathers, a large number of children may be placed at considerable risk by policies of incarceration. This article examines one dimension of the economic risk faced by children of incarcerated fathers: the reduction in the financial support that they receive. We use a population-based sample of urban children to examine the effects of incarceration on this support. Both cross-sectional and longitudinal regressions indicate that formerly incarcerated men are less likely to contribute to their families, and those who do contribute provide significantly less. The negative effects of incarceration on fathers’ financial support are due not only to the low earnings of formerly incarcerated men but also to their increased likelihood to live apart from their children. Men contribute far less through child support (formal or informal) than they do when they share their earnings within their household, suggesting that the destabilizing effects of incarceration on family relationships place children at significant economic disadvantage.

Prior Incarceration and Barriers to Receipt of Services among Entrants to Alternative to Incarceration Programs: A Gender-Based Disparity

Wu, Elwin; El-Bassel, Nabila; Gilbert, Louisa; Hess, Leona; Lee, Hae-Nim; Rowell, Tawandra L.
Fonte: Springer US Publicador: Springer US
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.33%
The high levels of health and psychosocial needs among correctional populations strongly shape the well-being of the urban communities from which a large number of criminal justice-involved individuals come or to which they return. The benefits of providing services to correction-involved individuals and linking them to providers such as with alternative to incarceration (ATI) programs may be limited if they encounter difficulties accessing such services. This study identified the types of barriers that have prevented entrants into ATI programs from receiving health and psychosocial services. We then tested the association between number of prior incarcerations and number of barriers by gender. From a random sample of adults (N = 322; 83 women and 239 men) entering ATI programs in New York City, data were collected via structured interviews that elicited self-reported sociodemographics, substance use, prior incarcerations, and barriers that had actually prevented a participant from visiting or returning to a service provider. Participants reported an average of 3.0 barriers that have prevented them from receiving health and psychosocial services. The most prevalent barriers predominantly concerned service providers’ inability to accommodate constraints on participants’ time availability or flexibility...

Alcohol use and incarceration adversely affect HIV-1 RNA suppression among injection drug users starting antiretroviral therapy

Palepu, Anita; Tyndall, Mark W.; Li, Kathy; Yip, Benita; O’Shaughnessy, Michael V.; Schechter, Martin T.; Montaner, Julio S. G.; Hogg, Robert S.
Fonte: Springer-Verlag Publicador: Springer-Verlag
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /12/2003 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.33%
We conducted this study among HIV-infected injection drug users to determine the effect of self-reported alcohol use and prior incarceration at the time of initiating antiretroviral therapy on subsequent HIV-1 RNA suppression. We examined the demographics, recent incarceration history, and drug and alcohol use history from the Vancouver Injection Drug User Study (VIDUS) questionnaire closest to the date of initiating antiretroviral therapy. We linked these data to the HIV/AIDS Drug Treatment Program. There were 234 VIDUS participants who accessed antiretroviral therapy through the Drug Treatment Program from August 1, 1996, to July 31, 2001. In terms of illicit drug use, 196 (84%) reported injecting heroin and cocaine at the time of initiating antiretroviral therapy. Multiple logistic regression revealed that in the 6 months prior to initiating antiretroviral therapy, alcohol use (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.32; 95% CI 0.13–0.81) and incarceration (AOR 0.22; 95% CI 0.09–0.58) were independently associated with lower odds of HIV-1 RNA suppression. Factors positively associated with HIV-1 RNA suppression included: adherence (AOR 1.27; 95% CI 1.06–1.51); lower baseline HIV-1 RNA (AOR 1.30: 95% CI 1.01–1.66); highly active antiretroviral therapy (AOR 4.10; 95% CI 1.56–10.6); months on therapy (AOR 1.1; 95% CI 1.06–1.14). Among HIV-infected injection drug users who were on antiretroviral therapy...

Incarceration of a colonoscope in an inguinal hernia: Case report and literature review

Tan, Victoria Ping-Yi; Lee, Yuk Tong; Poon, Jensen Tung Chung
Fonte: Baishideng Publishing Group Co., Limited Publicador: Baishideng Publishing Group Co., Limited
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.33%
Incarceration of an endoscope in an inguinal hernia may occur during the course of routine colonoscopy. The incarceration may occur on insertion or withdrawal and frequently the hernia is not suspected prior to the colonoscopy. Most commonly, a left sided inguinal hernia is involved, however right inguinal hernias may be implicated in subjects with altered anatomy post abdominal surgery. Incarceration of an endoscope in an inguinal hernia has been seldom reported in the literature which is likely to be related to under reporting. A range of techniques have been suggested by various authors over the last four decades to manage this unusual complication of colonoscopy. These techniques include utilizing fluoroscopy, manual external pressure and/or the fitting of a cap onto the tip of the colonoscope to facilitate colonoscopic navigation. The authors present a case report of incarceration of the colonoscope on withdrawal in an unsuspected left inguinal hernia with a review of the literature on the management of this colonoscopic complication. A management strategy is suggested.

Beyond Absenteeism: Father Incarceration and Child Development*

Geller, Amanda; Cooper, Carey E.; Garfinkel, Irwin; Schwartz-Soicher, Ofira; Mincy, Ronald B.
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /02/2012 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.47%
High rates of incarceration among American men, coupled with high rates of fatherhood among men in prison, have motivated recent research on the effects of parental imprisonment on children’s development. We use data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study to examine the relationship between paternal incarceration and developmental outcomes for approximately 3,000 urban children. We estimate cross-sectional and longitudinal regression models that control not only for fathers’ basic demographic characteristics and a rich set of potential confounders, but also for several measures of pre-incarceration child development and family fixed effects. We find significant increases in aggressive behaviors among children whose fathers are incarcerated, and some evidence of increased attention problems. The estimated effects of paternal incarceration are stronger than those of other forms of father absence, suggesting that children with incarcerated fathers may require specialized support from caretakers, teachers, and social service providers. The estimated effects are stronger for children who lived with their fathers prior to incarceration, but are also significant for children of nonresident fathers, suggesting that incarceration places children at risk through family hardships including and beyond parent-child separation.

The Paradox of Probation: Community Supervision in the Age of Mass Incarceration

PHELPS, MICHELLE S.
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.47%
After four decades of steady growth, U.S. states’ prison populations finally appear to be declining, driven by a range of sentencing and policy reforms. One of the most popular reform suggestions is to expand probation supervision in lieu of incarceration. However, the classic socio-legal literature suggests that expansions of probation instead widen the net of penal control and lead to higher incarceration rates. This article reconsiders probation in the era of mass incarceration, providing the first comprehensive evaluation of the role of probation in the build-up of the criminal justice system. The results suggest that probation was not the primary driver of mass incarceration in most states, nor is it likely to be a simple panacea to mass incarceration. Rather, probation serves both capacities, acting as an alternative and as a net-widener, to varying degrees across time and place. Moving beyond the question of diversion versus net widening, this article presents a new theoretical model of the probation-prison link that examines the mechanisms underlying this dynamic. Using regression models and case studies, I analyze how states can modify the relationship between probation and imprisonment by changing sentencing outcomes and the practices of probation supervision. When combined with other key efforts...

Incarceration and Sexual Risk: Examining the Relationship Between Men’s Involvement in the Criminal Justice System and Risky Sexual Behavior

Knittel, Andrea K.; Snow, Rachel C.; Griffith, Derek M.; Morenoff, Jeffrey
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /10/2013 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.41%
In this study, we used data from Add Health Waves II and III to compare men who had been incarcerated to those who had not, and examined whether incarceration was associated with increased numbers of sexual partners and increased odds of concurrent partnerships. We used multivariate regression and propensity-score matching to compare sexual behavior of Wave III male respondents who had been incarcerated with those who had not, and compared sexual behavior at Wave II to identify differences in sexual behavior prior to incarceration. Incarceration was associated with an increased rate of lifetime sexual partnership, but this was attenuated by substance use. Criminal justice involvement was associated with increased odds of having partners who report concurrent partnerships, but no further increase was seen with incarceration. There were no significant sexual behavior differences prior to incarceration. These results suggest that the criminal justice system and substance use may interact to shape sexual behavior.

Vitreous Incarceration in Patients Undergoing Second 20-Gauge Pars Plana Vitrectomy for Recurrent Retinal Detachment

Zheng, Yongxin; Lin, Haotian; Liu, Wen; Wang, Dandan; Huang, Suying
Fonte: International Scholarly Research Network Publicador: International Scholarly Research Network
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 09/10/2011 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.51%
Purpose. To observe and classify vitreous incarcerations in patients undergoing second 20-gauge pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) for recurrent retinal detachment. Methods. Retrospective noncomparative consecutive case series. Eighty-two consecutive patients with recurrent retinal detachment were included. The previous sclerotomy sites were examined by our sclera depression method and the vitreous incarceration were classified into Grade 0–IV by their severity under surgical microscope before second surgery. The relationship of vitreous incarceration and different ports was statistically investigated in our included patients. Results. Vitreous incarceration in the previous sclerotomy sites were found frequently. Vitreous cutter sites were most involved, but the infusion pipe sites were the least. According to our classification and definition, Grade III and IV of vitreous incarceration in all the three different sclerotomy sites accounted for 32.5%. Grade II of vitreous incarceration consisted of 12.6%. Grade 0 and I in all the three different sclerotomy sites were 54.8%. The frequency of all grades of vitreous incarceration in light port or vitreous cutter port was significant higher than that in infusion port. Conclusions. Vitreous incarceration in light port and vitreous cutter port are found more common than in infusion port for 20-gauge PPV with our new method.

The Effect of Incarceration on Adult Male BMI Trajectories, United States, 1981–2006

Houle, Brian
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /03/2014 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.33%
The prevalence of obesity and overweight is socially patterned, with higher prevalence among women, racial/ethnic minorities, and those with lower socio-economic status. Contextual factors also affect obesity risk. However, an omitted factor has been incarceration, particularly since it disproportionately affects minorities. This study examines the effects of incarceration on adult male body mass index (BMI) in the United States over the life course, and whether effects vary by race/ethnicity and education. BMI trajectories were analyzed over age using growth curve models of men ages 18–49 from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth panel study. BMI was based on self-reported height/weight (kg/m2). Being currently incarcerated increased BMI, but the effect varied by race/ethnicity and education: blacks experienced the largest increases, while effects were lowered for men with more education than a high school diploma. Cumulative exposure to prison increased BMI for all groups. These results suggest a differential effect of incarceration on adult male BMI among some racial/ethnic-education minority groups. Particularly given that these groups are most commonly imprisoned, incarceration may help structure obesity disparities and disadvantage across the life course.

The Effect of Paternal Incarceration on Material Hardship

Schwartz-Soicher, Ofira; Geller, Amanda; Garfinkel, Irwin
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /09/2011 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.33%
High rates of incarceration among American men, coupled with a high prevalence of fatherhood among the incarcerated, have led to millions of children and families whose fathers are, or have been, in the nation’s jails and prisons. This study uses data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Survey to estimate the extent to which paternal incarceration increases family material hardship. Analyses from a series of longitudinal regression models suggest that material hardship is statistically significant and positively associated with paternal incarceration. These hardships are found to reflect not only a reduction in fathers’ income and financial contributions but also an increase in financial and other family strains. The findings underscore the challenges facing families with incarcerated fathers. They also emphasize the need for efforts by criminal justice agencies and social service providers to help mitigate the risks associated with paternal incarceration.

The contagious nature of imprisonment: an agent-based model to explain racial disparities in incarceration rates

Lum, Kristian; Swarup, Samarth; Eubank, Stephen; Hawdon, James
Fonte: The Royal Society Publicador: The Royal Society
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 06/09/2014 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.51%
We build an agent-based model of incarceration based on the susceptible–infected–suspectible (SIS) model of infectious disease propagation. Our central hypothesis is that the observed racial disparities in incarceration rates between Black and White Americans can be explained as the result of differential sentencing between the two demographic groups. We demonstrate that if incarceration can be spread through a social influence network, then even relatively small differences in sentencing can result in large disparities in incarceration rates. Controlling for effects of transmissibility, susceptibility and influence network structure, our model reproduces the observed large disparities in incarceration rates given the differences in sentence lengths for White and Black drug offenders in the USA without extensive parameter tuning. We further establish the suitability of the SIS model as applied to incarceration by demonstrating that the observed structural patterns of recidivism are an emergent property of the model. In fact, our model shows a remarkably close correspondence with California incarceration data. This work advances efforts to combine the theories and methods of epidemiology and criminology.

HIV Risk Behaviors of Male and Female Jail Inmates Prior to Incarceration and One Year Post-Release

Adams, Leah M.; Kendall, Stephanie; Smith, Alison; Quigley, Erin; Stuewig, Jeffrey B.; Tangney, June P.
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /10/2013 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.41%
Individuals cycling in and out of the criminal justice system are at high risk for contracting HIV/AIDS. Most infections are contracted in the community, not during incarceration, but little is known about the profile of risk behaviors responsible for this elevated infection rate. This study investigated pre-incarceration and post-release HIV risk behaviors in a longitudinal study of 542 male and female inmates in a Northern Virginia jail. Although there was a significant decrease in risky behavior from pre-incarceration to post-incarceration, participants reported high levels of unprotected sexual activity and risky IV drug behaviors at both time points, emphasizing the need for prevention programming among this at-risk population. Gender differences in participants’ pre-incarceration and post-release HIV risk behaviors suggest the need for gender-specific interventions to reduce overall HIV risk. Identifying specific HIV risk behaviors of jail inmates is vital to improve treatment and intervention efforts inside and outside of correctional settings.

Effects of correctional boot camps on offending

Wilson, David B.; MacKenzie, Doris L.; Mitchell, Fawn Ngo
Fonte: Universität Tübingen Publicador: Universität Tübingen
Tipo: Aufsatz; info:eu-repo/semantics/article
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.41%
Background: Correctional boot camps were first opened in United States adult correctional systems in 1983. Since that time they have rapidly grown, first within adult systems and later in juvenile corrections, primarily within the United States. In the typical boot camp, participants are required to follow a rigorous daily schedule of activities including drill and ceremony and physical training, similar to that of a military boot-camp. Punishment for misbehavior is immediate and swift and usually involves some type of physical activity like push-ups. Boot-camps differ substantially in the amount of focus given to the physical training and hard labor aspects of the program versus therapeutic programming such as academic education, drug treatment or cognitive skills. Objectives: To synthesize the extant empirical evidence on the effects of boot-camps and boot camp like programs on the criminal behavior (e.g., postrelease arrest, conviction, or reinstitutionalization) of convicted adult and juvenile offenders. Search Strategy: Numerous electronic databases were searched for both published an unpublished studies. The keywords used were: boot camp(s), intensive incarceration, and shock incarceration. We also contacted U.S and non-U.S. researchers working in this area requesting assistance in locating additional studies. The final search of these sources was completed in early December of 2003. Selection Criteria: The eligibility criteria were (a) that the study evaluated a correctional boot camp...

An agent-based epidemiological model of incarceration

Lum, Kristian; Swarup, Samarth; Eubank, Stephen; Hawdon, James
Fonte: Universidade Cornell Publicador: Universidade Cornell
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 05/12/2013
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.51%
We build an agent-based model of incarceration based on the SIS model of infectious disease propagation. Our central hypothesis is that the observed racial disparities in incarceration rates between Black and White Americans can be explained as the result of differential sentencing between the two demographic groups. We demonstrate that if incarceration can be spread through a social influence network, then even relatively small differences in sentencing can result in the large disparities in incarceration rates. Controlling for effects of transmissibility, susceptibility, and influence network structure, our model reproduces the observed large disparities in incarceration rates given the differences in sentence lengths for White and Black drug offenders in the United States without extensive parameter tuning. We further establish the suitability of the SIS model as applied to incarceration, as the observed structural patterns of recidivism are an emergent property of the model. In fact, our model shows a remarkably close correspondence with California incarceration data, without requiring any parameter tuning. This work advances efforts to combine the theories and methods of epidemiology and criminology.