Página 10 dos resultados de 4919 itens digitais encontrados em 0.010 segundos

Vortex II Forecast Data - forecast_20100516130000Z_run001

Plale, Beth; Brewster, Keith; Mattocks, Craig; Bhangale, Ashish; Withana, Eran C.; Herath, Chathura; Terkhorn, Felix; Chandrasekar, Kavitha
Fonte: Universidade de Indiana Publicador: Universidade de Indiana
Formato: raster digital data/ NetCDF digital data/ textual digital data
Relevância na Pesquisa
26.87%
The Vortex2 project (http://www.vortex2.org/home/) supported 100 scientists using over 40 science support vehicles participated in a nomadic effort to understand tornados. For the six weeks from May 1st to June 15th, 2010, scientists went roaming from state-to-state following severe weather conditions. With the help of meteorologists in the field who initiated boundary conditions, LEAD II (https://portal.leadproject.org/gridsphere/gridsphere) delivered six forecasts per day, starting at 7am CDT, creating up to 600 weather images per day. This information was used by the VORTEX2 field team and the command and control center at the University of Oklahoma to determine when and where tornadoes are most likely to occur and to help the storm chasers get to the right place at the right time. VORTEX2 used an unprecedented fleet of cutting edge instruments to literally surround tornadoes and the supercell thunderstorms that form them. An armada of mobile radars, including the Doppler On Wheels (DOW) from the Center for Severe Weather Research (CSWR), SMART-Radars from the University of Oklahoma, the NOXP radar from the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL), radars from the University of Massachusetts, the Office of Naval Research and Texas Tech University (TTU)...

Vortex II Forecast Data - forecast_20100516140000Z_run001

Plale, Beth; Brewster, Keith; Mattocks, Craig; Bhangale, Ashish; Withana, Eran C.; Herath, Chathura; Terkhorn, Felix; Chandrasekar, Kavitha
Fonte: Universidade de Indiana Publicador: Universidade de Indiana
Formato: raster digital data/ NetCDF digital data/ textual digital data
Relevância na Pesquisa
26.87%
The Vortex2 project (http://www.vortex2.org/home/) supported 100 scientists using over 40 science support vehicles participated in a nomadic effort to understand tornados. For the six weeks from May 1st to June 15th, 2010, scientists went roaming from state-to-state following severe weather conditions. With the help of meteorologists in the field who initiated boundary conditions, LEAD II (https://portal.leadproject.org/gridsphere/gridsphere) delivered six forecasts per day, starting at 7am CDT, creating up to 600 weather images per day. This information was used by the VORTEX2 field team and the command and control center at the University of Oklahoma to determine when and where tornadoes are most likely to occur and to help the storm chasers get to the right place at the right time. VORTEX2 used an unprecedented fleet of cutting edge instruments to literally surround tornadoes and the supercell thunderstorms that form them. An armada of mobile radars, including the Doppler On Wheels (DOW) from the Center for Severe Weather Research (CSWR), SMART-Radars from the University of Oklahoma, the NOXP radar from the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL), radars from the University of Massachusetts, the Office of Naval Research and Texas Tech University (TTU)...

Vortex II Forecast Data - forecast_20100516150000Z_run001

Plale, Beth; Brewster, Keith; Mattocks, Craig; Bhangale, Ashish; Withana, Eran C.; Herath, Chathura; Terkhorn, Felix; Chandrasekar, Kavitha
Fonte: Universidade de Indiana Publicador: Universidade de Indiana
Formato: raster digital data/ NetCDF digital data/ textual digital data
Relevância na Pesquisa
26.87%
The Vortex2 project (http://www.vortex2.org/home/) supported 100 scientists using over 40 science support vehicles participated in a nomadic effort to understand tornados. For the six weeks from May 1st to June 15th, 2010, scientists went roaming from state-to-state following severe weather conditions. With the help of meteorologists in the field who initiated boundary conditions, LEAD II (https://portal.leadproject.org/gridsphere/gridsphere) delivered six forecasts per day, starting at 7am CDT, creating up to 600 weather images per day. This information was used by the VORTEX2 field team and the command and control center at the University of Oklahoma to determine when and where tornadoes are most likely to occur and to help the storm chasers get to the right place at the right time. VORTEX2 used an unprecedented fleet of cutting edge instruments to literally surround tornadoes and the supercell thunderstorms that form them. An armada of mobile radars, including the Doppler On Wheels (DOW) from the Center for Severe Weather Research (CSWR), SMART-Radars from the University of Oklahoma, the NOXP radar from the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL), radars from the University of Massachusetts, the Office of Naval Research and Texas Tech University (TTU)...

Vortex II Forecast Data - forecast_20100516160000Z_run001

Plale, Beth; Brewster, Keith; Mattocks, Craig; Bhangale, Ashish; Withana, Eran C.; Herath, Chathura; Terkhorn, Felix; Chandrasekar, Kavitha
Fonte: Universidade de Indiana Publicador: Universidade de Indiana
Formato: raster digital data/ NetCDF digital data/ textual digital data
Relevância na Pesquisa
26.87%
The Vortex2 project (http://www.vortex2.org/home/) supported 100 scientists using over 40 science support vehicles participated in a nomadic effort to understand tornados. For the six weeks from May 1st to June 15th, 2010, scientists went roaming from state-to-state following severe weather conditions. With the help of meteorologists in the field who initiated boundary conditions, LEAD II (https://portal.leadproject.org/gridsphere/gridsphere) delivered six forecasts per day, starting at 7am CDT, creating up to 600 weather images per day. This information was used by the VORTEX2 field team and the command and control center at the University of Oklahoma to determine when and where tornadoes are most likely to occur and to help the storm chasers get to the right place at the right time. VORTEX2 used an unprecedented fleet of cutting edge instruments to literally surround tornadoes and the supercell thunderstorms that form them. An armada of mobile radars, including the Doppler On Wheels (DOW) from the Center for Severe Weather Research (CSWR), SMART-Radars from the University of Oklahoma, the NOXP radar from the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL), radars from the University of Massachusetts, the Office of Naval Research and Texas Tech University (TTU)...

Vortex II Forecast Data - forecast_20100516170000Z_run001

Plale, Beth; Brewster, Keith; Mattocks, Craig; Bhangale, Ashish; Withana, Eran C.; Herath, Chathura; Terkhorn, Felix; Chandrasekar, Kavitha
Fonte: Universidade de Indiana Publicador: Universidade de Indiana
Formato: raster digital data/ NetCDF digital data/ textual digital data
Relevância na Pesquisa
26.87%
The Vortex2 project (http://www.vortex2.org/home/) supported 100 scientists using over 40 science support vehicles participated in a nomadic effort to understand tornados. For the six weeks from May 1st to June 15th, 2010, scientists went roaming from state-to-state following severe weather conditions. With the help of meteorologists in the field who initiated boundary conditions, LEAD II (https://portal.leadproject.org/gridsphere/gridsphere) delivered six forecasts per day, starting at 7am CDT, creating up to 600 weather images per day. This information was used by the VORTEX2 field team and the command and control center at the University of Oklahoma to determine when and where tornadoes are most likely to occur and to help the storm chasers get to the right place at the right time. VORTEX2 used an unprecedented fleet of cutting edge instruments to literally surround tornadoes and the supercell thunderstorms that form them. An armada of mobile radars, including the Doppler On Wheels (DOW) from the Center for Severe Weather Research (CSWR), SMART-Radars from the University of Oklahoma, the NOXP radar from the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL), radars from the University of Massachusetts, the Office of Naval Research and Texas Tech University (TTU)...

Vortex II Forecast Data - forecast_20100517120000Z_run001

Plale, Beth; Brewster, Keith; Mattocks, Craig; Bhangale, Ashish; Withana, Eran C.; Herath, Chathura; Terkhorn, Felix; Chandrasekar, Kavitha
Fonte: Universidade de Indiana Publicador: Universidade de Indiana
Formato: raster digital data/ NetCDF digital data/ textual digital data
Relevância na Pesquisa
26.87%
The Vortex2 project (http://www.vortex2.org/home/) supported 100 scientists using over 40 science support vehicles participated in a nomadic effort to understand tornados. For the six weeks from May 1st to June 15th, 2010, scientists went roaming from state-to-state following severe weather conditions. With the help of meteorologists in the field who initiated boundary conditions, LEAD II (https://portal.leadproject.org/gridsphere/gridsphere) delivered six forecasts per day, starting at 7am CDT, creating up to 600 weather images per day. This information was used by the VORTEX2 field team and the command and control center at the University of Oklahoma to determine when and where tornadoes are most likely to occur and to help the storm chasers get to the right place at the right time. VORTEX2 used an unprecedented fleet of cutting edge instruments to literally surround tornadoes and the supercell thunderstorms that form them. An armada of mobile radars, including the Doppler On Wheels (DOW) from the Center for Severe Weather Research (CSWR), SMART-Radars from the University of Oklahoma, the NOXP radar from the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL), radars from the University of Massachusetts, the Office of Naval Research and Texas Tech University (TTU)...

Vortex II Forecast Data - forecast_20100517130000Z_run001

Plale, Beth; Brewster, Keith; Mattocks, Craig; Bhangale, Ashish; Withana, Eran C.; Herath, Chathura; Terkhorn, Felix; Chandrasekar, Kavitha
Fonte: Universidade de Indiana Publicador: Universidade de Indiana
Formato: raster digital data/ NetCDF digital data/ textual digital data
Relevância na Pesquisa
26.87%
The Vortex2 project (http://www.vortex2.org/home/) supported 100 scientists using over 40 science support vehicles participated in a nomadic effort to understand tornados. For the six weeks from May 1st to June 15th, 2010, scientists went roaming from state-to-state following severe weather conditions. With the help of meteorologists in the field who initiated boundary conditions, LEAD II (https://portal.leadproject.org/gridsphere/gridsphere) delivered six forecasts per day, starting at 7am CDT, creating up to 600 weather images per day. This information was used by the VORTEX2 field team and the command and control center at the University of Oklahoma to determine when and where tornadoes are most likely to occur and to help the storm chasers get to the right place at the right time. VORTEX2 used an unprecedented fleet of cutting edge instruments to literally surround tornadoes and the supercell thunderstorms that form them. An armada of mobile radars, including the Doppler On Wheels (DOW) from the Center for Severe Weather Research (CSWR), SMART-Radars from the University of Oklahoma, the NOXP radar from the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL), radars from the University of Massachusetts, the Office of Naval Research and Texas Tech University (TTU)...

Vortex II Forecast Data - forecast_20100517150000Z_run001

Plale, Beth; Brewster, Keith; Mattocks, Craig; Bhangale, Ashish; Withana, Eran C.; Herath, Chathura; Terkhorn, Felix; Chandrasekar, Kavitha
Fonte: Universidade de Indiana Publicador: Universidade de Indiana
Formato: raster digital data/ NetCDF digital data/ textual digital data
Relevância na Pesquisa
26.87%
The Vortex2 project (http://www.vortex2.org/home/) supported 100 scientists using over 40 science support vehicles participated in a nomadic effort to understand tornados. For the six weeks from May 1st to June 15th, 2010, scientists went roaming from state-to-state following severe weather conditions. With the help of meteorologists in the field who initiated boundary conditions, LEAD II (https://portal.leadproject.org/gridsphere/gridsphere) delivered six forecasts per day, starting at 7am CDT, creating up to 600 weather images per day. This information was used by the VORTEX2 field team and the command and control center at the University of Oklahoma to determine when and where tornadoes are most likely to occur and to help the storm chasers get to the right place at the right time. VORTEX2 used an unprecedented fleet of cutting edge instruments to literally surround tornadoes and the supercell thunderstorms that form them. An armada of mobile radars, including the Doppler On Wheels (DOW) from the Center for Severe Weather Research (CSWR), SMART-Radars from the University of Oklahoma, the NOXP radar from the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL), radars from the University of Massachusetts, the Office of Naval Research and Texas Tech University (TTU)...

Vortex II Forecast Data - forecast_20100517160000Z_run001

Plale, Beth; Brewster, Keith; Mattocks, Craig; Bhangale, Ashish; Withana, Eran C.; Herath, Chathura; Terkhorn, Felix; Chandrasekar, Kavitha
Fonte: Universidade de Indiana Publicador: Universidade de Indiana
Formato: raster digital data/ NetCDF digital data/ textual digital data
Relevância na Pesquisa
26.87%
The Vortex2 project (http://www.vortex2.org/home/) supported 100 scientists using over 40 science support vehicles participated in a nomadic effort to understand tornados. For the six weeks from May 1st to June 15th, 2010, scientists went roaming from state-to-state following severe weather conditions. With the help of meteorologists in the field who initiated boundary conditions, LEAD II (https://portal.leadproject.org/gridsphere/gridsphere) delivered six forecasts per day, starting at 7am CDT, creating up to 600 weather images per day. This information was used by the VORTEX2 field team and the command and control center at the University of Oklahoma to determine when and where tornadoes are most likely to occur and to help the storm chasers get to the right place at the right time. VORTEX2 used an unprecedented fleet of cutting edge instruments to literally surround tornadoes and the supercell thunderstorms that form them. An armada of mobile radars, including the Doppler On Wheels (DOW) from the Center for Severe Weather Research (CSWR), SMART-Radars from the University of Oklahoma, the NOXP radar from the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL), radars from the University of Massachusetts, the Office of Naval Research and Texas Tech University (TTU)...

Vortex II Forecast Data - forecast_20100517170000Z_run001

Plale, Beth; Brewster, Keith; Mattocks, Craig; Bhangale, Ashish; Withana, Eran C.; Herath, Chathura; Terkhorn, Felix; Chandrasekar, Kavitha
Fonte: Universidade de Indiana Publicador: Universidade de Indiana
Formato: raster digital data/ NetCDF digital data/ textual digital data
Relevância na Pesquisa
26.87%
The Vortex2 project (http://www.vortex2.org/home/) supported 100 scientists using over 40 science support vehicles participated in a nomadic effort to understand tornados. For the six weeks from May 1st to June 15th, 2010, scientists went roaming from state-to-state following severe weather conditions. With the help of meteorologists in the field who initiated boundary conditions, LEAD II (https://portal.leadproject.org/gridsphere/gridsphere) delivered six forecasts per day, starting at 7am CDT, creating up to 600 weather images per day. This information was used by the VORTEX2 field team and the command and control center at the University of Oklahoma to determine when and where tornadoes are most likely to occur and to help the storm chasers get to the right place at the right time. VORTEX2 used an unprecedented fleet of cutting edge instruments to literally surround tornadoes and the supercell thunderstorms that form them. An armada of mobile radars, including the Doppler On Wheels (DOW) from the Center for Severe Weather Research (CSWR), SMART-Radars from the University of Oklahoma, the NOXP radar from the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL), radars from the University of Massachusetts, the Office of Naval Research and Texas Tech University (TTU)...

Vortex II Forecast Data - forecast_20100518140000Z_run001

Plale, Beth; Brewster, Keith; Mattocks, Craig; Bhangale, Ashish; Withana, Eran C.; Herath, Chathura; Terkhorn, Felix; Chandrasekar, Kavitha
Fonte: Universidade de Indiana Publicador: Universidade de Indiana
Formato: raster digital data/ NetCDF digital data/ textual digital data
Relevância na Pesquisa
26.87%
The Vortex2 project (http://www.vortex2.org/home/) supported 100 scientists using over 40 science support vehicles participated in a nomadic effort to understand tornados. For the six weeks from May 1st to June 15th, 2010, scientists went roaming from state-to-state following severe weather conditions. With the help of meteorologists in the field who initiated boundary conditions, LEAD II (https://portal.leadproject.org/gridsphere/gridsphere) delivered six forecasts per day, starting at 7am CDT, creating up to 600 weather images per day. This information was used by the VORTEX2 field team and the command and control center at the University of Oklahoma to determine when and where tornadoes are most likely to occur and to help the storm chasers get to the right place at the right time. VORTEX2 used an unprecedented fleet of cutting edge instruments to literally surround tornadoes and the supercell thunderstorms that form them. An armada of mobile radars, including the Doppler On Wheels (DOW) from the Center for Severe Weather Research (CSWR), SMART-Radars from the University of Oklahoma, the NOXP radar from the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL), radars from the University of Massachusetts, the Office of Naval Research and Texas Tech University (TTU)...

Vortex II Forecast Data - forecast_20100518150000Z_run001

Plale, Beth; Brewster, Keith; Mattocks, Craig; Bhangale, Ashish; Withana, Eran C.; Herath, Chathura; Terkhorn, Felix; Chandrasekar, Kavitha
Fonte: Universidade de Indiana Publicador: Universidade de Indiana
Formato: raster digital data/ NetCDF digital data/ textual digital data
Relevância na Pesquisa
26.87%
The Vortex2 project (http://www.vortex2.org/home/) supported 100 scientists using over 40 science support vehicles participated in a nomadic effort to understand tornados. For the six weeks from May 1st to June 15th, 2010, scientists went roaming from state-to-state following severe weather conditions. With the help of meteorologists in the field who initiated boundary conditions, LEAD II (https://portal.leadproject.org/gridsphere/gridsphere) delivered six forecasts per day, starting at 7am CDT, creating up to 600 weather images per day. This information was used by the VORTEX2 field team and the command and control center at the University of Oklahoma to determine when and where tornadoes are most likely to occur and to help the storm chasers get to the right place at the right time. VORTEX2 used an unprecedented fleet of cutting edge instruments to literally surround tornadoes and the supercell thunderstorms that form them. An armada of mobile radars, including the Doppler On Wheels (DOW) from the Center for Severe Weather Research (CSWR), SMART-Radars from the University of Oklahoma, the NOXP radar from the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL), radars from the University of Massachusetts, the Office of Naval Research and Texas Tech University (TTU)...

Vortex II Forecast Data - forecast_20100518160000Z_run001

Plale, Beth; Brewster, Keith; Mattocks, Craig; Bhangale, Ashish; Withana, Eran C.; Herath, Chathura; Terkhorn, Felix; Chandrasekar, Kavitha
Fonte: Universidade de Indiana Publicador: Universidade de Indiana
Formato: raster digital data/ NetCDF digital data/ textual digital data
Relevância na Pesquisa
26.87%
The Vortex2 project (http://www.vortex2.org/home/) supported 100 scientists using over 40 science support vehicles participated in a nomadic effort to understand tornados. For the six weeks from May 1st to June 15th, 2010, scientists went roaming from state-to-state following severe weather conditions. With the help of meteorologists in the field who initiated boundary conditions, LEAD II (https://portal.leadproject.org/gridsphere/gridsphere) delivered six forecasts per day, starting at 7am CDT, creating up to 600 weather images per day. This information was used by the VORTEX2 field team and the command and control center at the University of Oklahoma to determine when and where tornadoes are most likely to occur and to help the storm chasers get to the right place at the right time. VORTEX2 used an unprecedented fleet of cutting edge instruments to literally surround tornadoes and the supercell thunderstorms that form them. An armada of mobile radars, including the Doppler On Wheels (DOW) from the Center for Severe Weather Research (CSWR), SMART-Radars from the University of Oklahoma, the NOXP radar from the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL), radars from the University of Massachusetts, the Office of Naval Research and Texas Tech University (TTU)...

Vortex II Forecast Data - forecast_20100519120000Z_run001

Plale, Beth; Brewster, Keith; Mattocks, Craig; Bhangale, Ashish; Withana, Eran C.; Herath, Chathura; Terkhorn, Felix; Chandrasekar, Kavitha
Fonte: Universidade de Indiana Publicador: Universidade de Indiana
Formato: raster digital data/ NetCDF digital data/ textual digital data
Relevância na Pesquisa
26.87%
The Vortex2 project (http://www.vortex2.org/home/) supported 100 scientists using over 40 science support vehicles participated in a nomadic effort to understand tornados. For the six weeks from May 1st to June 15th, 2010, scientists went roaming from state-to-state following severe weather conditions. With the help of meteorologists in the field who initiated boundary conditions, LEAD II (https://portal.leadproject.org/gridsphere/gridsphere) delivered six forecasts per day, starting at 7am CDT, creating up to 600 weather images per day. This information was used by the VORTEX2 field team and the command and control center at the University of Oklahoma to determine when and where tornadoes are most likely to occur and to help the storm chasers get to the right place at the right time. VORTEX2 used an unprecedented fleet of cutting edge instruments to literally surround tornadoes and the supercell thunderstorms that form them. An armada of mobile radars, including the Doppler On Wheels (DOW) from the Center for Severe Weather Research (CSWR), SMART-Radars from the University of Oklahoma, the NOXP radar from the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL), radars from the University of Massachusetts, the Office of Naval Research and Texas Tech University (TTU)...

Vortex II Forecast Data - forecast_20100519130000Z_run001

Plale, Beth; Brewster, Keith; Mattocks, Craig; Bhangale, Ashish; Withana, Eran C.; Herath, Chathura; Terkhorn, Felix; Chandrasekar, Kavitha
Fonte: Universidade de Indiana Publicador: Universidade de Indiana
Formato: raster digital data/ NetCDF digital data/ textual digital data
Relevância na Pesquisa
26.87%
The Vortex2 project (http://www.vortex2.org/home/) supported 100 scientists using over 40 science support vehicles participated in a nomadic effort to understand tornados. For the six weeks from May 1st to June 15th, 2010, scientists went roaming from state-to-state following severe weather conditions. With the help of meteorologists in the field who initiated boundary conditions, LEAD II (https://portal.leadproject.org/gridsphere/gridsphere) delivered six forecasts per day, starting at 7am CDT, creating up to 600 weather images per day. This information was used by the VORTEX2 field team and the command and control center at the University of Oklahoma to determine when and where tornadoes are most likely to occur and to help the storm chasers get to the right place at the right time. VORTEX2 used an unprecedented fleet of cutting edge instruments to literally surround tornadoes and the supercell thunderstorms that form them. An armada of mobile radars, including the Doppler On Wheels (DOW) from the Center for Severe Weather Research (CSWR), SMART-Radars from the University of Oklahoma, the NOXP radar from the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL), radars from the University of Massachusetts, the Office of Naval Research and Texas Tech University (TTU)...

Vortex II Forecast Data - forecast_20100519140000Z_run001

Plale, Beth; Brewster, Keith; Mattocks, Craig; Bhangale, Ashish; Withana, Eran C.; Herath, Chathura; Terkhorn, Felix; Chandrasekar, Kavitha
Fonte: Universidade de Indiana Publicador: Universidade de Indiana
Formato: raster digital data/ NetCDF digital data/ textual digital data
Relevância na Pesquisa
26.87%
The Vortex2 project (http://www.vortex2.org/home/) supported 100 scientists using over 40 science support vehicles participated in a nomadic effort to understand tornados. For the six weeks from May 1st to June 15th, 2010, scientists went roaming from state-to-state following severe weather conditions. With the help of meteorologists in the field who initiated boundary conditions, LEAD II (https://portal.leadproject.org/gridsphere/gridsphere) delivered six forecasts per day, starting at 7am CDT, creating up to 600 weather images per day. This information was used by the VORTEX2 field team and the command and control center at the University of Oklahoma to determine when and where tornadoes are most likely to occur and to help the storm chasers get to the right place at the right time. VORTEX2 used an unprecedented fleet of cutting edge instruments to literally surround tornadoes and the supercell thunderstorms that form them. An armada of mobile radars, including the Doppler On Wheels (DOW) from the Center for Severe Weather Research (CSWR), SMART-Radars from the University of Oklahoma, the NOXP radar from the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL), radars from the University of Massachusetts, the Office of Naval Research and Texas Tech University (TTU)...

Vortex II Forecast Data - forecast_20100519150000Z_run001

Plale, Beth; Brewster, Keith; Mattocks, Craig; Bhangale, Ashish; Withana, Eran C.; Herath, Chathura; Terkhorn, Felix; Chandrasekar, Kavitha
Fonte: Universidade de Indiana Publicador: Universidade de Indiana
Formato: raster digital data/ NetCDF digital data/ textual digital data
Relevância na Pesquisa
26.87%
The Vortex2 project (http://www.vortex2.org/home/) supported 100 scientists using over 40 science support vehicles participated in a nomadic effort to understand tornados. For the six weeks from May 1st to June 15th, 2010, scientists went roaming from state-to-state following severe weather conditions. With the help of meteorologists in the field who initiated boundary conditions, LEAD II (https://portal.leadproject.org/gridsphere/gridsphere) delivered six forecasts per day, starting at 7am CDT, creating up to 600 weather images per day. This information was used by the VORTEX2 field team and the command and control center at the University of Oklahoma to determine when and where tornadoes are most likely to occur and to help the storm chasers get to the right place at the right time. VORTEX2 used an unprecedented fleet of cutting edge instruments to literally surround tornadoes and the supercell thunderstorms that form them. An armada of mobile radars, including the Doppler On Wheels (DOW) from the Center for Severe Weather Research (CSWR), SMART-Radars from the University of Oklahoma, the NOXP radar from the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL), radars from the University of Massachusetts, the Office of Naval Research and Texas Tech University (TTU)...

Vortex II Forecast Data - forecast_20100519160000Z_run001

Plale, Beth; Brewster, Keith; Mattocks, Craig; Bhangale, Ashish; Withana, Eran C.; Herath, Chathura; Terkhorn, Felix; Chandrasekar, Kavitha
Fonte: Universidade de Indiana Publicador: Universidade de Indiana
Formato: raster digital data/ NetCDF digital data/ textual digital data
Relevância na Pesquisa
26.87%
The Vortex2 project (http://www.vortex2.org/home/) supported 100 scientists using over 40 science support vehicles participated in a nomadic effort to understand tornados. For the six weeks from May 1st to June 15th, 2010, scientists went roaming from state-to-state following severe weather conditions. With the help of meteorologists in the field who initiated boundary conditions, LEAD II (https://portal.leadproject.org/gridsphere/gridsphere) delivered six forecasts per day, starting at 7am CDT, creating up to 600 weather images per day. This information was used by the VORTEX2 field team and the command and control center at the University of Oklahoma to determine when and where tornadoes are most likely to occur and to help the storm chasers get to the right place at the right time. VORTEX2 used an unprecedented fleet of cutting edge instruments to literally surround tornadoes and the supercell thunderstorms that form them. An armada of mobile radars, including the Doppler On Wheels (DOW) from the Center for Severe Weather Research (CSWR), SMART-Radars from the University of Oklahoma, the NOXP radar from the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL), radars from the University of Massachusetts, the Office of Naval Research and Texas Tech University (TTU)...

Vortex II Forecast Data - forecast_20100519170000Z_run001

Plale, Beth; Brewster, Keith; Mattocks, Craig; Bhangale, Ashish; Withana, Eran C.; Herath, Chathura; Terkhorn, Felix; Chandrasekar, Kavitha
Fonte: Universidade de Indiana Publicador: Universidade de Indiana
Formato: raster digital data/ NetCDF digital data/ textual digital data
Relevância na Pesquisa
26.87%
The Vortex2 project (http://www.vortex2.org/home/) supported 100 scientists using over 40 science support vehicles participated in a nomadic effort to understand tornados. For the six weeks from May 1st to June 15th, 2010, scientists went roaming from state-to-state following severe weather conditions. With the help of meteorologists in the field who initiated boundary conditions, LEAD II (https://portal.leadproject.org/gridsphere/gridsphere) delivered six forecasts per day, starting at 7am CDT, creating up to 600 weather images per day. This information was used by the VORTEX2 field team and the command and control center at the University of Oklahoma to determine when and where tornadoes are most likely to occur and to help the storm chasers get to the right place at the right time. VORTEX2 used an unprecedented fleet of cutting edge instruments to literally surround tornadoes and the supercell thunderstorms that form them. An armada of mobile radars, including the Doppler On Wheels (DOW) from the Center for Severe Weather Research (CSWR), SMART-Radars from the University of Oklahoma, the NOXP radar from the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL), radars from the University of Massachusetts, the Office of Naval Research and Texas Tech University (TTU)...

Vortex II Forecast Data - forecast_20100521140000Z_run001

Plale, Beth; Brewster, Keith; Mattocks, Craig; Bhangale, Ashish; Withana, Eran C.; Herath, Chathura; Terkhorn, Felix; Chandrasekar, Kavitha
Fonte: Universidade de Indiana Publicador: Universidade de Indiana
Formato: raster digital data/ NetCDF digital data/ textual digital data
Relevância na Pesquisa
26.87%
The Vortex2 project (http://www.vortex2.org/home/) supported 100 scientists using over 40 science support vehicles participated in a nomadic effort to understand tornados. For the six weeks from May 1st to June 15th, 2010, scientists went roaming from state-to-state following severe weather conditions. With the help of meteorologists in the field who initiated boundary conditions, LEAD II (https://portal.leadproject.org/gridsphere/gridsphere) delivered six forecasts per day, starting at 7am CDT, creating up to 600 weather images per day. This information was used by the VORTEX2 field team and the command and control center at the University of Oklahoma to determine when and where tornadoes are most likely to occur and to help the storm chasers get to the right place at the right time. VORTEX2 used an unprecedented fleet of cutting edge instruments to literally surround tornadoes and the supercell thunderstorms that form them. An armada of mobile radars, including the Doppler On Wheels (DOW) from the Center for Severe Weather Research (CSWR), SMART-Radars from the University of Oklahoma, the NOXP radar from the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL), radars from the University of Massachusetts, the Office of Naval Research and Texas Tech University (TTU)...